Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are glad to see the Mueller report conclude that neither Donald Trump not anyone else in his campaign conspired with Russia to influence the 2016 elections. They also get a kick out of Trump critics frantically moving the goalposts to claim the new attorney general is doing Trump’s bidding or that the real action is in Congress or with the federal prosecutors in New York. And they shake their heads at the overall performance of the mainstream media in covering this story since the last presidential campaign.

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Sally Jenkins is a sports columnist for the Washington Post, and one of the outstanding sportswriters in the entire country. Her father, Dan Jenkins, passed away earlier this month. She wrote a column about him, here. Jay says that it is one of the best columns he has ever read, on any subject. Dan Jenkins worked for Sports Illustrated, Golf Digest, and other publications, and wrote a string of best-selling novels, including “Semi-Tough,” “Life Its Ownself,” and “Baja Oklahoma.” Jay is among the legions of Dan Jenkins nuts. He and Sally talk about her dad. And then about sports at large: college basketball, pro basketball, Colin Kaepernick, MLB, soccer, and more. You know what’s a great sport? Figure skating. Dan Jenkins thought so, Sally Jenkins thinks so – and Jay thinks so. If you don’t know Sally Jenkins, you will very much enjoy getting to know her, in this ’cast. Her dad used to ask, “Who can explain the athletic heart?” Both of these Jenkinses are pretty good at it.

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Kat Timpf visited the last Blockbuster Video store left on earth and shares what she found. Kat is a regular on “The Greg Gutfeld Show” and writes for National Review. Then, Jon and Stephen wonder if Joe Biden is too goofy to be president.

The intro/outro and Stephen’s song of the week is “Woman” by Karen O and Danger Mouse, and Jon’s song of the week is “Viktor Borgia” by Stephen Malkmus. To listen to all the music featured on The Conservatarians, subscribe to our all-new 2019 Spotify playlist!

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Arthur Brooks is one of the luminaries of the conservative world. An economist and public-policy analyst, he is the longtime president of the American Enterprise Institute. He will soon decamp for Harvard. His latest book is “Love Your Enemies: How Decent People Can Save America from the Culture of Contempt.” He and Jay talk about this, and related subjects. And not-necessarily-related subjects, including music. Brooks was a professional French-horn player before turning to other pursuits. Over the course of this lively and unusual conversation, he and Jay make some points, tell some stories (including on themselves), and express their mutual admiration.

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Bjorn Ihler is an expert on counter-extremism and he works for peace, human rights, and mutual

Bjorn Ihler

understanding. He had a highly, highly unusual experience eight years ago: He survived the horrendous massacre in Norway, in which 77 people were killed. Today, he talks with Jay about the massacre in New Zealand. He has plenty to say, as you can imagine. There are parallels between the two massacres. Bjorn, incidentally, is the husband of Asma Khalifa, the Libyan woman with whom Jay recently did a “Q&A,” here. Together, they founded the Khalifa Ihler Institute.

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David Luhnow is the Latin America bureau chief of the Wall Street Journal – and one of Jay’s favorite journalists. Luhnow is immensely knowledgeable, and he imparts his knowledge in clear, balanced terms. Though an American, he was born and raised in Mexico. His brother Jeff has an interesting job, and he’s very good at it: general manager of the Houston Astros. David and Jay start out by talking a little baseball. Then they get into the nitty-gritty: murder, dictatorship, freedom, and the burden of history in Latin America.

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All eyes are on Venezuela — to the extent they’re on Latin America at all. But spare a glance for Nicaragua. The Nicaraguans are going through hell right now as the dictator, Daniel Ortega, has cracked down hard. He has made a special villain out of Felix Maradiaga — Jay’s guest on this “Q&A.” The regime has good reason to fear and hate Maradiaga: He is a bold and thoughtful advocate of democracy. In this podcast, he takes us through the Nicaraguan situation, past, present, and even future. A most illuminating interview. A bracing one, too.

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Asma Khalifa is a young woman from Libya — a Berber. She is also a human-rights activist and democracy leader. She is one of Jay’s favorite people. He says he considers her a heroine. Jay recorded this “Q&A” with her in Mexico City, where she was participating in a meeting of the Oslo Freedom Forum. During the Libyan Civil War, she sided with the rebels, against Qaddafi. She volunteered to be a field nurse. She saw terrible things, atrocities. She did not like the hatred that was filling her heart. That was not her, she reasoned. So she did something extraordinary. She requested to treat enemy forces, Qaddafi’s men, for a while. She has an amazing experience to relate. Also in this podcast, Asma Khalifa talks about Syria and other vital matters.

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Madeleine Kearns is a young journalist from Scotland. She works at National Review. She has recently been on an unusual beat: transgenderism as it relates to children. She has written, “… some American children are on irreversible cross-sex hormones as young as 12 and have double mastectomies as young as 13.” When you hear about these cases, she says, you want to ask, “Is this really happening?” It is. Jay Nordlinger talks with her about it: a fascinating, appalling subject. Maddy Kearns would rather not be covering it. But someone has to do it, she says, and what happened is this: “I learned too much to be able to walk away in good conscience.”

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are grateful to see Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson rebuke Jussie Smollett for perpetrating a hate crime hoax and damaging the reputation of the city. Johnson also blasted the media for ignoring serious issues while providing wall to wall coverage of Smollett. They’re also horrified by reports of a active duty military officer who plotted to kill many people with bombings, shootings, and outbreaks of disease. And they correct MSNBC hosts Katy Tur and Ari Melber for claiming that George Washington was a “native son of New York”.

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America appreciate the comments former CBS reporter Lara Logan made on media bias turning into media activism. They also discuss Bernie Sanders launching another presidential campaign and wonder if the 77-year-old democratic socialist will be able to make waves in 2020. And they also chuckle as California Sen. Kamala Harris stumbles badly over her response to the Jussie Smollett hoax.

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The Conservatarians wrap up the Jussie Smollett hoax and the press misbehavior surrounding it, and weigh in on Trump’s emergency powers and Amazon’s departure from New York City.

The intro/outro and Stephen’s song of the week is “Boys Got to Go” by BRONCHO and Jon’s song of the week is “Vote for Me” by The Specials. To listen to all the music featured on The Conservatarians, subscribe to our all-new 2019 Spotify playlist!

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In an earlier episode, Jay talked with Charles Hill. Now he talks with another Grand Strategist at Yale, Professor John Lewis Gaddis, who is best known for Cold War history. His biography of George F. Kennan won the Pulitzer Prize. Jay talks with him about Kennan, of course — and about Paul Nitze and many another Cold War figure. They also talk about figures more recent, including George W. Bush. In addition to politics and history, they talk about campus life — and about Professor Gaddis’s upbringing in small-town Texas. You don’t have to pay tuition at Yale to sit with JLG. Click on this ’cast.

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Jay’s guest is a legendary teacher at Yale University: Charles Hill, a retired Foreign Service officer and a diplomat-in-residence, among other things, at Yale. He is especially known for Grand Strategy. In previous times, he was an aide to Kissinger, Shultz, and, at the United Nations, Boutros-Ghali. With Jay, he talks about his upbringing in New Jersey, his life in the arena, his career in the academy, and the fate of the world.

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Jay does a sportscast — but with a twist at the end: a discussion of Star Wars, Star Trek, etc., with two experts on the subject: David French and Sopan Deb. David is one of Jay’s regular sports gurus, and so is Vivek Dave. They are both present. Sopan is a ringer, a guest guru: a writer for the New York Times, a stand-up comedian, a musician, and more. The gang talks about the NBA, including the Boston Celtics (Sopan’s team), recent trade action, the All-Star game (worth watching?), and Charles Barkley (a classic American). Then there is talk about the Super Bowl: Is Tom Brady the GOAT? How about Coach Belichick? Furthermore, what about the Super Bowl ad that relates directly to Vivek? Finally, there is the sci-fi flight. Come along for the ride.

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This week on the Big Show, we start in frigid Minnesota, home of one James Lileks, who describes life in a Polar Vortex for those of us who live in more temperate climes. Then, we’re off to the swamps of Jersey for a visit from Commentary’s Noah Rothman to talk about his fascinating new book Unjust: Social Justice and the Unmaking of America. Then, it’s off to Venezuela where Annika Rothstein is on the ground in Caracas reporting on the collapse of a revolution. Finally, we end up back in the good old U.S. of A for some Super Bowl picks from the hosts. Who ya got?

Music from this week’s podcast: Not as Much as Football by Mojo Nixon

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This week on GLoP, we ramble though a grand tour of disparate topics: Charlton Heston (his turns in both Earthquake and Planet of The Apes), clown school, the Democrat’s double shot caffeinated response to Starbuck’s Howard Shultz pondering a Presidential run, the perils of being too forthcoming on social media and some pondering about the effect of social media on society at large, and a whole lot of other ephemera and giggles. In other words, have a hot, steaming cup of GLoP on us.

Music from this week’s show: Black Coffee in Bed by Squeeze

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Is BuzzFeed’s story a blockbuster or a bust? Can Gillette clean up toxic masculinity? Does McDonald’s deliver to the White House? The intro/outro song and Jon’s song of the week is “Clean Up” by Pedro the Lion. Stephen’s song of the week is “Death in Midsummer” by Deerhunter. To listen to all the music featured on The Conservatarians, subscribe to our all-new 2019 Spotify playlist!

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are back with another full serving of crazy martinis. First, they question the motives and geometry skills of Minnesota Democratic Rep. Ilhan Omar, who publicly insists that Lindsay Graham is somehow “compromised” because he’s become more supportive of President Trump. They also dissect the bumbling scheme confessed by Michael Cohen, who says Trump directed him to pay thousands of dollars to rig online polls in 2014 and 2015. And that’s just the beginning of the story. Finally, Jim shares some lesser-known details and oddities from the career of former Vice President Joe Biden that he uncovered for his latest article.

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Megha Rajagopalan is a foreign correspondent for BuzzFeed News. She is one of Jay’s favorite reporters. She grew up in Maryland, and for years reported from China. She is now in the Middle East. She and Jay talk mainly about China: the pleasures and perils of reporting from there; the mass round-up of the Uyghurs; the ability of ordinary Chinese to find out the truth about their country; and so on. At the end, Jay asks Megha why she wanted to be a journalist in the first place. You will enjoy getting to know this young woman.

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