Aaron Schmidt grew up a military brat and met his wife, Kara Dawn, freshman year of high school when they were assigned to be lab partners. He talks wanting to be a college football coach but being the student manager of the UVA football team cured him of that desire, being raised Catholic, becoming a 7th grade English teacher, and then getting married, selling everything and hightailing it to LA because he and Kara could see the next 10 years of their lives mapped out before them. A series of odd jobs and a series of personal losses left him at loose ends until he found a passion to pursue in Gorucks that ultimately led him to join the Army Reserves as a psychological operations specialist two years before the cutoff for enlistment. He and Bridget have an honest and revealing discussion about being mission-oriented, the hard work of a successful marriage, overcoming loss and aimlessness, and the 4 tenets of his personal ethos.

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With the Woo Review, Bridget introduces her audience to all things New Age. From astrology, to tarot, to sound baths, to reiki, Bridget shares her hippie side with her listeners.

This week’s guest, Anne, discusses her addiction to psychics and how over the course of two and a half years she spent an estimated $60,000 on psychic readings. Anne covers how she got started, why being in love with a musician kept her going back, how her psychic was a force for positive change, but ultimately how her addiction to psychics became a replacement for a higher power in her life. Bridget shares her own psychic abilities, how she learned to hide them young, the time she realized she was being haunted by a ghost dog, and her own spiritual journey of finding God when she went off Twitter for Lent. Both recovering alcoholics, they delve into a deep discussion about addiction in general, the bravery of people in 12 step programs who must confront harsh truths about themselves every day, self-actualization, owning your own story, and wrestling with the fact that even if you come from privilege it does not mean you’re not entitled to your pain – everyone’s pain is relevant and unique.

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Josh Schollmeyer, co-founder, and editor of MEL magazine, talks with Bridget about the meaning of modern masculinity in a changing world, constructively channeling your rage, and how kids movies are more traumatizing for children than adult movies. They also cover Josh’s years working in a lumber yard to learn the value of hard work, how he got access to Hugh Hefner’s private scrapbook collection when he was in college, and how learning to be fine with being humiliated is a crucial part of success. Josh covers his years working for Playboy, how he tried to be an agent for change but was also complicit at a time when the brand was giving in to its worst impulses, and how the chip on his shoulder over the events that forced him out of Playboy became fuel for his drive to succeed. Now with MEL, Josh discusses figuring out how to talk to men in the wake of #metoo and that one of the big problems he sees is not just a battle of the sexes, but that men are not talking to each other.

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