On the second of this week’s podcasts, John Podhoretz asks Abe Greenwald and Noah Rothman whether the health-care debacle this week is simply a reflection of the same pressures on the conservative coalition Donald Trump saw and conquered by running for president last year–and what it will mean for him and them that he has provided no rallying point for Republican politicians. And then they discuss OJ Simpson. Give a listen.

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Carl Cannon writes about “the degraded conditions of our dysfunctional, rude, hair-on-fire politics”–but also says they’ve been pretty bad before, in On This Date: Discovering America One Day at a Time.

In a 10-minute conversation with the Bookmonger, Cannon describes how this book was born from the morning emails he writes as Washington Bureau Chief of RealClearPolitics, how he tells the story of America with an unconventional narrative, and why being American comes to us as a gift but turns into an obligation.

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This week on Law Talk, the professors (ably herded by Troy Senik) talk about collusion — what it is, what it isn’t, who’s in danger and who isn’t. Then, activist judges make things for the Trump administration’s travel ban and Richard and John explain why. Also on the docket: gun laws in California are amongst the toughest in the country. Does the Heller decision give the state more leeway in regulating guns even more? And we re-visit the Supreme Court’s ruling on The Slants (and the Washington Redskins) and, yes, that famous selfie-taking monkey.

Have a banana, @ejhill.

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Today, our topic is the state of the Republican effort to repeal and replace Obamacare. We’re recording this podcast just after Congress has come back to Washington from the Fourth of July recess.

The Senate Republican health care bill, the Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017, is on thin ice, with about ten Republican Senators expressing reservations about the bill. Can Mitch McConnell get 50 senators to yes? What are the implications for the future of health care in America if he can—or can’t?

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George Washington was a warrior and a farmer and a leader. Was he also a reader? Kevin J. Hayes says “yes,” in George Washington: A Life in Books.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Hayes discusses what Washington liked to read, whether he felt intimidated around great minds such as Jefferson and Hamilton, and why nobody has written an intellectual biography of him.

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Yuval Levin joins Mona and Jay to talk about health care: What to do? More specifically, what to do NOW, at this impasse? Then, Mona and Jay talk about Trump and Mika and Joe. Later, they talk about Hong Kong, China, and Taiwan – and tell some interesting stories.

The show ends with Marilyn Horne, singing “You’re a Grand Old Flag” (including the verses – rare!).

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This week on GLoP, CNN publishes a fake story and gets hoodwinked, and Catcher In The Rye is one of the seminal novels of the 20th century. Does it still have relevance for 21st century kids? The men of GLoP weigh in.

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The world is more dangerous today than it was just a year ago, says Brad Thor, author of the new thriller, Use of Force.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Thor describes the inspiration for his latest page-turner, discusses the usefulness of “black contracts,” and tells why he thinks the Burning Man festival is an obvious target for terrorists.

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If you’ve been following the Trump/Russia/Comey/Mueller situation and you’re not an attorney, you might find it difficult to understand what’s going on. Conflict of interest, obstruction of justice, abuse of power, impeachment … you likely know what all of that is, but what about the particulars? Bradley Moss of the Law Office of Mark Zaid specializes in litigation on matters relating to national security, federal employment, and security clearance law, as well as the Freedom of Information Act/Privacy Act. He joins Jay and Neal to give an overview of all these issues and what it means going forward.

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America react to North Korea’s release of an American hostage, express concern over troubling reports of his health condition, and marvel at how former NBA star Dennis Rodman seems to provide intelligence on North Korea that our own spies can’t uncover. They also discuss the rumors NewsMax CEO Chris Ruddy stirred up during a PBS interview about President Trump possibly firing special prosecutor Robert Mueller. And they question Megyn Kelly’s decision to host conspiracy theorist Alex Jones of Infowars on her new Sunday night show on NBC.

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Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast for June 13, 2017 – it’s the Those Damned Old People edition of the show. We set out clearly and distinctly, at the top of the show, to delineate clearly our topics. and then we just talk about James Comey and the failing battle against the deep state.

We do, after all, talk about TrumpCare. Question number one in that context is: does the folderol of the Russian collusion theater actually make a difference on the progress — or lack thereof — of Trump’s legislative agenda? Seems like Paul Ryan thinks that even if the White House burns down the folks on Capitol Hill, they will continue moving forward (though no doubt at their glacial pace). To wit, it looks like, all of a sudden, certain liberal outlets (e.g., Josh Marshall’s Talking Points Memo) are getting frantic that Obamacare is actually about to be repealed and replaced. I have no idea if this is the good repeal and replace, the dreaded Obamacare-lite repeal and replace, or something in between. But I am not particular. Any repeal and replace will make me happy — just a question of degree.

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Kevin and Charlie discuss the U.K.’s general election, Alex Jones, and any digression that will get them away from politics.

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America discuss California Sen. Dianne Feinstein’s CNN interview, in which she states that the Senate Judiciary Committee should investigate former Attorney General Loretta Lynch for potentially politicizing the Hillary Clinton investigation. They also react as Feinstein goes on to change the Democratic Party narrative from collusion with Russia to President Trump’s obstruction of justice. And they express little sympathy for Wisconsin Democrats accusing Republicans of partisan redistricting and Jim unloads on liberals who consistently claim an act is unconstitutional if it does not fit with their agenda.

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In the first COMMENTARY podcast of the week, Abe Greenwald and I survey the wreckage of Theresa May and point out that her disastrous showing represents the fourth major election in a year in which publics have rejected the idea that political professionalism is something to be sought in a leader. Why? They’ve forgotten, or have never learned, what the world was like until the fall of the Berlin Wall. Give a listen.

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It’s Comeypalooza on this installment of Law Talk, as Richard Epstein and John Yoo react to the former FBI director’s congressional testimony. We won’t give it away here, but the professors’ diagnosis is sure to surprise you. Then: Was Robert Mueller’s appointment as independent counsel necessary?; a disagreement on the proper use of the impeachment power; Which cabinet secretary should be packing his bags?; Understanding the 25th Amendment; and the legal and political implications of withdrawing from the Paris agreement on climate change. All that, plus Yoo in the south of France, Epstein in Chicago, and Senik ties the knot.

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Jay is away this week. Charlie Sykes and Peter Wehner join Mona to evaluate the impact of the Comey hearings and discuss the broader questions facing conservatives in the age of Trump.

Music: Brahms. Variations on a theme by Paganini

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The hard thing about producing a weekly podcast is coming up with relevant topics to talk about. Nothing ever happens in this boring administration we’ve elected. Yawn. This week, we’ve got Pat Buchanan (you must buy his new book Nixon’s White House Wars: The Battles That Made and Broke a President and Divided America Forever) who weighs in on those endless Nixon/Trump comparisons, and gives us his take on how the President is doing so far. Then, our old pal Dennis Prager made some waves this week with a column titled Why Conservatives Still Attack Trump. We delve into that and his new project with Adam Corrolla (he’ll be on in a few weeks too), No Safe Spaces, a film on the decay of free speech/thought on college campuses and what this means for our country. Also, join us on July 23rd for a special taping of Uncommon Knowledge with Peter Robinson at the Reagan Library, hosted by Pat Sajak. Details here.

Music from this week’s podcast: Fixing A Hole by The Beatles

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It’s a debate in the form of a book: Selfish Libertarians and Socialist Conservatives? The Foundations of the Libertarian-Conservative Debate, by Nathan W. Schlueter and Nikolai G. Wenzel.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Schlueter and Wenzel describe their different opinions about immigration, marriage, and other issues as well as explain why their debate matters more than ever in the era of President Trump.

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Ever been or felt judged by another woman for your diet, parenting, wardrobe picks? This week Elisha and Kelly rant about personal experiences where social norms seem to be thrown out the window. Plus — if you were a fan of a successful 90s sitcom you’re in luck because Hollywood seems to be bringing back the oldies in hopes of ratings gold.”

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Larry Kudlow and Tim Pawlenty return to discuss about why impeachment talk is ridiculous at this point time, why tax cuts are indeed on the way, and what they would do about the problem in North Korea.

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It’s never a dull moment with the Trump administration and to parse everything that happened this week, we call on our good friend, former podcaster, and the newly minted host of Washington Week In Review Bob Costa. After that, we take a look back at the 2016 race with Jonathan Allen, co-author of Shattered: Inside Hillary Clinton’s Doomed CampaignAlso, taping, vaping, and narrative shaping. Yeah, we went there.

Music from this week’s podcast: Shattered by The Rolling Stones

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Donald Trump fired James Comey this week and it set the political world ablaze. Jay and Neal invited GOP strategist and columnist for The Daily Beast to talk about what happened, why it happened and what is going to happen next.

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Daniel Krauthammer joins Need to Know to talk of the divide on the right over nationalism versus patriotism. Is nationalism a good impulse or not? He also offers views on the Comey firing.

Jay and Mona then speak of the French elections, immigration, the unfilled jobs in the Trump Administration, how to boost the economy, Prince Phillip’s retirement, uniforms (school and otherwise), and the great Kate O’Beirne – RIP.

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Rob has retuned from the worker’s paradise, Jonah visits the Parrothead paradise, John watches bad Bond movies on the subway, Rob admits he once went to a a Weird Al concert, and Jonah seeks forgiveness in order to retain his geek cred. Also, is anti-Globalism French toast? Are Trump voters feeling a little buyer’s remorse? Tune in and find out.

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Lots of people read and watched National Review’s William F. Buckley Jr.–and some of them did it from the White House, explains Alvin S. Felzenberg in A Man and His Presidents: The Political Odyssey of William F. Buckley Jr.

In a short conversation with The Bookmonger, Felzenberg explains Buckley’s behind-the-scenes role as a political advisor, how Buckley got to know Ronald Reagan, and what Buckley (who died in 2008) might think of President Trump.

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