“Set you house in perfect order before you criticize the world.” That’s Rule #6 in Jordan B. Peterson’s new book, “12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos.”

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Peterson describes the purpose of his12 rules, the advantages and disadvantages of chaos and order, and why he turns to stories for wisdom.

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Philip Hamburger describes what he calls the most pressing civil-liberties issue of our time in The Administrative Threat.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Hamburger describes the problem of the administrative state, why Woodrow Wilson deserves much of the blame, and whether President Trump is providing a solution.

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Patrick Deneen isn’t talking about merely Democrats and progressives in his new book with a bracing title, Why Liberalism Failed — he’s talking about the American political regime, including conservatives.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Deneen describes why he thinks liberalism’s days are numbered, how Americans have become more individualist and more statist at the same time, and whether there’s actually a viable alternative to the liberalism we’ve come to know, even with its weaknesses.

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He was the first modern Republican, says Robert W. Merry in his new biography, President McKinley: Architect of the American Century.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Merry argues McKinley is more important than most people recognize; that his lack of recognition is partly the fault of his colorful successor, Theodore Roosevelt; and that McKinley pioneered a form of “non-colonial imperialism” that holds lessons for American foreign policy today.

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The explosion was so enormous, it killed 2,000 people and erupted into a mushroom cloud long before the Manhattan Project–and John U. Bacon writes about how and why it happened in The Great Halifax Explosion: A World War I Story of Treachery, Tragedy, and Extraordinary Heroism.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Bacon describes the horrible events of December 6, 1917 as well as what lessons the disaster holds for us today. He also explains how his interest in this story began through his love of hockey.

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World War II was in fact many wars, writes Victor Davis Hanson in The Second World Wars: How the First Global Conflict Was Fought and Won.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Hanson describes why he avoided writing yet another chronological or operational history of World War II, how the Allies were able to suffer so many casualties and still win, and why better statesmanship in the 1930s might have prevented this terrible conflict from erupting.

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How did a woman who loved poetry as a student at Hillsdale College become one of the 20th century’s great cryptanalysts? Jason Fagone tells the remarkable story of Elizebeth Smith Friedman in The Woman Who Smashed Codes: A True Story of Love, Spies, and the Unlikely Heroine who Outwitted America’s Enemies.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Fagone describes how fondness for Shakespeare turned a young woman into a codebreaker, how she hunted fascist agents during the Second World War, and how she and her husband were present at the creation of the National Security Agency.

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It’s a novel of faith, freedom, and forgiveness says John E. Kramer, author of Blythe.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Kramer explains how and why he wrote the book, whether fiction can accomplish goals that nonfiction cannot, and why he picked this for an epigraph: “One of mankind’s greatest sins is inaction in the face of injustice.”

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America in the late 19th century looks a lot like the America of 2017, says Richard White, author of The Republic for Which It Stands: The United States during Reconstruction and the Gilded Age, 1865-1896.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, White discusses what drew him to write about “historical flyover country,” why Reconstruction went so poorly, and whether President Lincoln might have made things turn out differently if he had lived past 1865.

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Was Churchill a drunk? Richard M. Langworth insists he wasn’t in Winston Churchill, Myth and Reality: What He Actually Did and Said.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Langworth describes Churchill’s drinking habits and addresses the accusations that Churchill exacerbated the 1943 famine in Bengal. He also recommends biographies of Churchill and offers his assessment of the new film Dunkirk.

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Carl Cannon writes about “the degraded conditions of our dysfunctional, rude, hair-on-fire politics”–but also says they’ve been pretty bad before, in On This Date: Discovering America One Day at a Time.

In a 10-minute conversation with the Bookmonger, Cannon describes how this book was born from the morning emails he writes as Washington Bureau Chief of RealClearPolitics, how he tells the story of America with an unconventional narrative, and why being American comes to us as a gift but turns into an obligation.

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George Washington was a warrior and a farmer and a leader. Was he also a reader? Kevin J. Hayes says “yes,” in George Washington: A Life in Books.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Hayes discusses what Washington liked to read, whether he felt intimidated around great minds such as Jefferson and Hamilton, and why nobody has written an intellectual biography of him.

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The world is more dangerous today than it was just a year ago, says Brad Thor, author of the new thriller, Use of Force.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Thor describes the inspiration for his latest page-turner, discusses the usefulness of “black contracts,” and tells why he thinks the Burning Man festival is an obvious target for terrorists.

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It’s a debate in the form of a book: Selfish Libertarians and Socialist Conservatives? The Foundations of the Libertarian-Conservative Debate, by Nathan W. Schlueter and Nikolai G. Wenzel.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Schlueter and Wenzel describe their different opinions about immigration, marriage, and other issues as well as explain why their debate matters more than ever in the era of President Trump.

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Lots of people read and watched National Review’s William F. Buckley Jr.–and some of them did it from the White House, explains Alvin S. Felzenberg in A Man and His Presidents: The Political Odyssey of William F. Buckley Jr.

In a short conversation with The Bookmonger, Felzenberg explains Buckley’s behind-the-scenes role as a political advisor, how Buckley got to know Ronald Reagan, and what Buckley (who died in 2008) might think of President Trump.

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What’s so special about the Special Forces? Mark Moyar tells all in Oppose Any Foe: The Rise of America’s Special Operations Forces.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Moyar describes how Navy SEALS, Delta Force, and others differ from the conventional military, why presidents and the public are prone to romanticizing them, how President Trump ought to use them.

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They plotted a literary revolution. Both became famous in their time, but only one endures in the popular imagination today, says James McGrath Morris, author of The Ambulance Drivers: Hemingway, Dos Passos, and a Friendship Made and Lost in War.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Morris describes why Ernest Hemingway and John Dos Passos drove ambulances during the First World War rather than served as soldiers, how they became pals, and which of their books are worth reading today. He also describes the poltical journey of Dos Passos, who began life on the pacifist left and finished it as a contributor to National Review.

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Confronted by Russian aggression, Islamic terrorism, and rising nationalism, Europe is in an existential crisis, says James Kirchick, author of The End of Europe: Dictators, Demagogues, and the Coming Dark Age.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Kirchick explains why Americans must care more about the continent’s fate as well as which threat worries him the most. Then he describes a worst-case scenario for the future of Europe.

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What’s the case for classical studies in the 21st century? Eric Adler offers an answer in Classics, the Culture Wars, and Beyond.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Adler says that there’s more value in the study of classics than most people realize, but that scholars often don’t know how to respond to public interest in their field. He also describes the reputation of Victor Davis Hanson, probably the best-known classicist in the United States but also a controversial figure among his academic peers.

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What’s the meaning of meaning? Now there’s a heady question–but one that Emily Esfahani Smith tackles with clear-headed, narrative prose in The Power of Meaning: Crafting a Life that Matters.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Smith discusses the ingredients of a meaningful life, argues that happiness is overrated, and describes how the rise of social media and the decline of religious faith have shaped the modern search for meaning.

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