“He looked as if he would know exactly what to do, if awakened suddenly in the night, ready for anything”

This story is the seventh in a series of seven about an immigrant boy who became my good friend and holds a special place in the history of the Claremont Institute. Let’s begin by daring to question the prevailing dogmas of our time, to open our minds to all times

This story is the sixth in a series of seven about an immigrant boy who became my good friend and holds a special place in the history of the Claremont Institute. They learned from this Hungarian immigrant that they are the fortunate of the earth and that their great good fortune lies in the country into which they were born

This story is the fifth in a series of seven about an immigrant boy who became my good friend and holds a special place in the history of the Claremont Institute. I never knew so much hog in a man

This story is the fourth in a series of seven about an immigrant boy who became my good friend and holds a special place in the history of the Claremont Institute. He always regarded the human mind as free to be determined by the truth about the greatest questions

This story is the third in a series of seven about an immigrant boy who became my good friend and holds a special place in the history of the Claremont Institute. For the rest of his life, oranges would always smell like freedom

This story is the second in a series of seven about an immigrant boy who became my good friend and holds a special place in the history of the Claremont Institute. It was spring, 1946, and Albert Camus was in New York City on the only visit he would ever make to America

This story is the first in a series of seven about an immigrant boy who became my good friend and holds a special place in the history of the Claremont Institute. “Why are we going to America?” . . . “We were born American, but in the wrong place”

President Kennedy told a special joint session of Congress that it was “time for a great new American Enterprise”

The Oregon Trail was the superhighway of the early American West

The Congress of the United States named him “first in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen”

If there was ever a real-life John Wayne — or the character Wayne played so well — it was Ted Williams

John Quincy Adams and a pioneer reflect on the Northwest Territory and American freedom

“Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.” This episode is in loving memory of Merle Whitis.

How airmail became woven into the fabric of American life

“Our history is but a transcript of his claims on our gratitude”

Ben Hogan and “the purest stroke I’ve ever seen”

Why “the finest Shakespeare collection in the world” is in Washington, D.C

“Savage Jack Falstaff” meets Robert E. Lee at Appomattox Court House

American victory in World War II was far from preordained