In this week’s Reagan Forum podcast we go back a week to May 3, 2022 for our in-person event with Larry Hogan, the Governor of Maryland and previous Chairman of the National Governor’s Association, who was a speaker in the Reagan Foundation’s Time for Choosing Speaker Series, a new forum for leading voices in the conservative movement. Governor Larry Hogan, Jr. was sworn in as the 62nd governor of Maryland on January 21, 2015. In 2018, he was overwhelmingly re-elected to a four-year term, receiving the most votes of any Maryland gubernatorial candidate and becoming only the second Republican governor to be re-elected in the 242-year history of the state. During his Time for Choosing Speech at the Reagan Library, Governor Hogan addressed additional critical issues facing the future of the Republican Party.

It’s commencement address season and like all American presidents, our 40th delivered quite a few. One of his most memorable was at his Alma Mater, Eureka College on May 9, 1982, celebrating the 50th anniversary of his class of ’32. So in this podcast, we’ll listen to an excerpt from that historic Commencement address in which he used the occasion to launch the START program for reducing nuclear weapons for both the United States and Russia. In the second half of the podcast, we’ll hear his speech after he had been inducted into Eureka College’s Athletic Hall of Fame – get ready to smile and laugh. It’s a classic.

By May, 1982, the President’s economic reforms were just starting to kick in, slowly. Once his economic reform package passed in August 1981, he relied on Republican Congressional support to reassure their constituents to have faith that the reforms would eventually kick the economy into full gear. As you might recall, Republicans were in the minority in the House with Tip O’Neill as the Speaker. In the Senate, Republicans held a small majority, only 53, seats with Howard Baker as Majority Leader.

In this week’s Reagan Forum podcast we go back a week to April 21, 2022 for our in-person event with American politician and former CIA clandestine officer who served as the U.S. representative for Texas’s 23rd congressional district from 2015 to 2021, William Hurd. Congressman Hurd came to the Reagan Library to discuss his latest book, “American Reboot: An Idealist’s Guide to Getting Big Things Done,” a bold political playbook for America rooted in the timeless ideals of bipartisanship, inclusivity, and democratic values.

As you perhaps recall, in the late 1970’s, the energy crisis was in full swing. The price of gasoline and oil were soaring as we waited hours in gas lines and worried about a shortage of heating oil in the winter. Demands for more energy ran up against serious environmental concerns. Sound familiar? Over a 5 year period, Governor Reagan, then out of office, delivered 85 broadcasts on the energy problem and environment – we’ll listen to two of them today…one entitled OIL I and the other entitled OPEC.

In this week’s Reagan Forum podcast we go back only a few days to April 19, 2022 for our in-person event with United States Senator Tim Scott, who was a speaker in the Reagan Foundation’s Time for Choosing Speaker Series, a new forum for leading voices in the conservative movement. Tim Scott grew up in a poor, single parent household in South Carolina. But after graduating college and building his own successful small business, Tim Scott developed his mission statement he still lives by today – to positively affect the lives of a billion people. He current serves as the Senator from South Carolina after first being appointed to the position by Governor Nikki Haley in 2013 and then winning his seat in a special election in 2014. He was elected to a full term in 2016.

40 years ago on April 15, 1982, President Reagan met with reporters in the Oval Office to announce his plans to speak to the United Nations’ Arms Limitation Conference in June. He also suggested that General Secretary Brezhnev of the Soviet Union would do the same. And he hoped he could meet with the elusive Soviet Leader during the Conference. Ultimately, Brezhnev did not attend the Conference but sent Andrei Gromyko, the Soviet Foreign Minister, in his place. Rumors were that Brezhnev was in poor health, and yes, ultimately confirmed by his death five months later in November 1982. But just a few days after President Reagan met with those reporters in the Oval Office in April, he felt compelled to report to the American people his approach and his strong beliefs on the subject of nuclear war and delivered this radio address on April 17th.

In this week’s Reagan Forum podcast we go back only a week to April 6, 2022 for our in-person event with Kristi Noem, the Governor of South Dakota, who was a speaker in the Reagan Foundation’s Time for Choosing Speaker Series, a new forum for leading voices in the conservative movement. Kristi Noem has served as the 33rd governor of South Dakota since 2019, and is the state’s first female governor. In addition to serving as Governor, Kristi Noem is a wife, lifelong rancher, and small business owner. Despite all of this, she says that her greatest accomplishment is raising her three children.

As the world watches the Soviet Union march through Ukraine, terrorizing and pillaging, we’ll go back to the words of Ronald Reagan in his autobiography when he noted that in the 70’s, the Soviets interpreted our hesitation and reluctance to act, along with our reduced sense of National self-confidence, as a weakness and exploited it to the fullest, to create a communist dominated world.

In this week’s Reagan Forum podcast we go back just a few days to April 4, 2022 for our in-person event with Supreme Court Associate Justice Amy Coney Barrett. Previously, Amy Coney Barrett served as a law clerk for Judge Laurence H. Silberman of the United States Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit from 1997 to 1998, and for Justice Antonin Scalia of the Supreme Court of the United States during the 1998 Term. After two years in private law practice in Washington, D.C., she became a law professor, joining the faculty of Notre Dame Law School in 2002. She was appointed a Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit in 2017. During the event at the Reagan Library she sat on stage in conversation with Reagan Foundation and Institute Board Chairman Fred Ryan.

Russian aggression is top of mind today with their tragic invasion of Ukraine. Sadly, it’s not a new topic if you look at the Reagan archives where citizen Reagan was speaking to Americans. Let’s go back to these words from his speech in October 1964, 58 years ago.Russian aggression is top of mind today with their tragic invasion of Ukraine. Sadly, it’s not a new topic if you look at the Reagan archives where citizen Reagan was speaking to Americans. Let’s go back to these words from his speech in October 1964, 58 years ago.

In this week’s “A Reagan Forum” we go back two months to our Reaganism Podcast with Former Congressman and Senator of Missouri, Jim Talent. In this episode of Reaganism, Reagan Institute Director Roger Zakheim and Senator Talent discuss the 2021 report of the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission. The discussion touches on China’s trade practices as well as their activities in the Xinjiang and Hong Kong regions.

In this week’s Reagan Forum podcast we go back to March 7, 2022 for our in-person event with United States Senator Tom Cotton, who was the Foundation’s sixth speaker in its Time for Choosing Speaker Series, a new forum for leading voices in the conservative movement. Tom Cotton is the United States Senator from Arkansas. He previously served as a lawyer, leaving law because of the September 11th attacks on our country and joining the military. He served nearly five years on active duty in the United States Army as an Infantry Officer. Senator Cotton served in Iraq with the 101st Airborne and in Afghanistan with a Provincial Reconstruction Team. Between his two combat tours, he served with The Old Guard at Arlington National Cemetery.

Today, we’ll begin a two-part podcast about Taiwan and the People’s Republic of China by hearing Ronald Reagan’s thoughts in the 70’s and 80’s. Governor Ronald Reagan was a vocal supporter of Taiwan and was first introduced to the country in 1971 when he traveled there at the request of President Nixon. His task was to reassure Chiang Kai-shek that the United States remained committed to U.S.-Taiwan relations, even though Henry Kissinger was holding secret meetings in the People’s Republic of China. Ronald Reagan regarded Taiwan as a loyal, democratic, longtime ally to whom we owed unqualified support and he was concerned how Al Haig and others in the state department were so eager to improve relations with the Peoples Republic of China, that, ultimately as president, tried to press him back from this pledge of support.

In this week’s “A Reagan Forum” we present American journalist and political commentator John Avlon, who joined us at the Reagan Library virtually on February 28, 2022, to discuss his newest book, Lincoln and the Fight for Peace which is a revelatory history of Abraham Lincoln’s plan to secure a just and lasting peace after the Civil War — a vision that inspired future presidents as well as the world’s most famous peacemakers, including Nelson Mandela, Mahatma Gandhi, and Martin Luther King, Jr. It is a story of war and peace, race and reconciliation.

For today’s podcast, we’re showcasing how President Reagan used humor and Irish wit to build relationships, defuse anger and reach across the aisle consistently. We know how he fought with Speaker of the House, Tip O’Neill, and we also know how hard he worked to build a relationship with his political foe whom he considered a friend and colleague. You’ll hear him say that we live in “a country which permits two not-so-shy and not-so-retiring Irishmen to have it out on the issues rather than on each other or their countrymen.” A lesson our current politicians seem to have missed.

In this week’s “A Reagan Forum” we present former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich. Speaker Gingrich is well-known as the architect of the “Contract with America” that led the Republican Party to victory in 1994, creating the first conservative majority in the House in 40 years. He is also recognized internationally as an expert on world history, military issues, and international affairs, as he is the longest-serving teacher of the Joint War Fighting course for Major Generals.

The subject today? Newspapers. Every year in March, President Reagan would deliver a speech to the National Newspaper Association at their annual meeting, often inviting them to the White House. His remarks were always very entertaining – and well, you know the phrase, keep your friends close but your enemies closer? He always kept his eye on the ball.

In this week’s “A Reagan Forum” we’re going to break from our normal format to honor President and Mrs. Reagan on what would have been their 70th wedding anniversary on March 4, 2022. 70 years prior, on March 4, 1952, Ronald Reagan wed Nancy Davis at the Little Brown Church in the Valley near Los Angeles, California. Their only wedding guests were their best man and maid of honor, married couple William Holden and his wife, Brenda. It’s been said that Romeo had his Juliet, Antony had his Cleopatra. Prince Edward had his Wallis, and Ronald Reagan had his beloved Nancy. Charlton Heston once said theirs was “probably the greatest love affair in the history of the American Presidency.”

Today’s podcast on the Olympics is inspired by some of the controversies surrounding the 2022 Beijing games, which is no surprise because controversies have plagued this global event for years. Today, you’ll hear Ronald Reagan’s critical thinking on the subject from the 1970’s.