NTK FeatureIt’s quite the personality parade this week on Need to Know. Jay and Mona note Ezekiel Emanuel’s proposal that everyone should die at age 75. The only way Obamacare will be financially viable, they wonder? Jay notes that Rahm (mayor of Chicago, brother of Ezekiel) is a former ballet dancer – and worthy of admiration on that score. “He still stands like a dancer.” Those may be the kindest words Jay has said lately about a leading Democrat. But wait, he also praises Obama’s UN speech (with qualifications)!

Remember all the caterwauling by Harry Reid about the Koch brothers, and by Barack Obama about Citizens United? Well, it seems Democrats are outraising and outspending Republicans this year – by a lot.

More

N2K_001bThis week, Need to Know breathes a huge sigh of relief that our second favorite country (or maybe tied for second with Israel, in Mona’s case), Great Britain, remains intact. Jay and Mona talk of Edmund Burke and Al Qaeda, and whether spanking children is bad for the black community. Jay recalls that of all the left’s depredations over the years, the libeling of Republicans and conservatives as racists was the worst. Mona agrees and notes that it’s always Groundhog Day on matters of race relations for a very good reason – it’s the only way Democrats can get elected.

Music from this week’s episode:

More

NTK FeatureMona and Jay begin with a guest, Michael Rubin, the foreign-policy analyst. He briefs us on ISIS, and the American response. Later, Mona discusses the return of the “security moms” — American women concerned about security, and acting on those instincts, politically. She also mentions an Obama official’s geography blunder. If a Republican had made the same blunder . . .

The two discuss Common Core, and this relevant question: What do you do when your gurus disagree? There is some remembering of 9/11, including the bravery and example of the passengers aboard Flight 93.

More

NTK FeatureIt’s British week on Need to Know – not by design, but Jay and Mona found themselves commenting on the cousins. Some news from the mother country is profoundly disturbing – like the story of Rotherham, where a ring of Pakistani Muslim men raped and abused young girls while authorities turned a blind eye so as not to offend multicultural sensitivities. And there’s the Sainsbury store that emptied its shelves of kosher products in response to mob threats.

On the other hand, Jay and Mona recall fondly the BBC shows they loved – “My Word” and “My Music,” and Mona gushes a bit about old recordings of “Desert Island Discs” which she’s recently discovered are available on iTunes. 

More

BDBITL-O-H-I-OIn this week’s episode, Mona and Jay cover even greater ground than usual. They talk about the fragility of civilization (a perpetual theme). The degradation of America’s cities. The drama in Ferguson, Mo. The problem of policing.

They also talk about ISIS, or whatever they’re calling themselves this week. Are they a group that simply needs to be pulverized? Then the discussion turns naturally to Iran, and the question of the mullahs’ deterrability, or non-deterrability.

More

NTK FeatureWhat do the King of Saudi Arabia, the leader of Egypt, and the leader of India have in common? They’re all more anti-Hamas than our president. Jay and Mona consider the oddness of this moment, and then move on to the question of why – of all things – Israel is routinely accused of being Nazi.

There are countries and movements in the world that resemble Nazis, and Jay discusses a new book about the abuse of Falun Gong by China. It’s one small window into the horrific nature of that regime. And yet, we trade, we travel, we study – we pretend that China is just another normal country.

More

UnknownNTK FeatureMona and Jay welcome a guest, Andy McCarthy – with whom they discuss a topic of the hour, impeachment. Has it come to this ultimate measure? When might it? Mona and Jay continue to talk about Obama, in duly aggrieved tones. They also talk about Israel and anti-Semitism. And the immigration debate and other topics of the hour. Relief comes at the end, when they turn to music. The music we leave you with is Maria Callas in the Habanera from “Carmen.”

 

More

Nina_Teicholz_photoNTK FeatureEverything you thought you knew about what to eat and what not to eat is wrong. That’s the thesis of guest Nina Teicholz’s book The Big Fat Surprise: Why Butter, Meat, and Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet. No, Need to Know has not become the Today Show, and Mona hastens to clarify that she finds diet discussions a major bore. Teicholz’s book is something different – a deep reflection on how scientists, public health authorities, government bodies, and nutritionists could have gotten it so wrong for so long. Teicholz doesn’t shrink from drawing lessons about other areas where conventional wisdom might be mistaken.

Jay and Mona then move on to the competing appeals court decisions on Obamacare this week. Looking forward to a Supreme Court resolution, Jay notes that it’s never the liberal justices who surprise us. 

More

NTK FeatureOn this week’s ’cast, Mona and Jay talk about Obama as foreign-policy disaster. There is some talk about domestic-policy disasters, too. And will Hillary Clinton, if president, be another master of disaster? Mistress of disaster? Is there any difference at all between BHO and HRC? The latter thinks that the “reset” with Russia has been a crashing success. “Crashing” is the word.

Mona and Jay also talk about the Koch brothers, and the gross, indeed frightening, demonization of them. Furthermore, they weigh in on Cleveland—not as the city that LeBron James will call home once more, but as the site of the 2016 GOP convention.

More

NTK FeatureWhat happened to the missing white voters in 2012? That’s one question Jay and Mona chew over with political guru Sean Trende of Real Clear TrendePolitics. Sean is one of the smartest analysts studying secular trends in voting patterns and he offers insights on how young voters, African Americans, and whites have been moving in recent cycles and are likely to move in coming elections. Tune in for one of the biggest underreported shifts between 2008 and 2012.

Next our hosts take note of the impeachment talk circulating among some Republicans, attend to the performance of the Iron Dome in Israel, bow our heads at a street ceremony in front of the Cuban mission in New York City marking a grim anniversary, wonder whether Obama is tired of being president, and doff our caps for Antonio Vivaldi. We close with a particularly apt story about Giacomo Puccini contributed by a Ricochet listener!

More

NTK FeatureOf course, this could be the title of most any Need to Know. This week, Mona and Jay talk about France: its glories and its shame. That leads to talk about the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)—which has voted to divest from Israel. The IRS’s e-mails crashed and burned. Rose Mary Woods, President Nixon’s secretary, should have had such a kind and understanding press. Hillary Clinton sometimes goes southern in her speech—which is amusing. It has now been 20 years since O.J. Simpson committed those murders—or do we need to say “allegedly”? The Obama administration is practically married to the media. Etc., etc.

Toward the end of the podcast, Mona and Jay talk about music and some music-related issues—for example, the latest controversy from the Metropolitan Opera. The Met will stage John Adams’s Death of Klinghoffer, but will not broadcast it in theaters. A testy decision. In other news, Sir Mix-a-Lot performed “Baby Got Back” with the Seattle Symphony. If these aren’t the end times, they are near.

More

NTK FeatureJay and Mona both thought of Saigon this week as the monsters took Mosul and Tikrit and set their sights on Baghdad. It’s a moment of shame for the country, they agree, but the frightening and surreal aspect of the story is the total inability of President Obama to learn from his mistakes. Carter, for all his many faults, could be swayed by reality. Obama seems immune to it.

As grim as the news is this week, the always spirited and insightful Jennifer Rubin of the Washington Post cheers up the Need to Know hosts by helping to analyze Eric Cantor’s loss – and defending his reputation. We close with a few smiles about Hillary Clinton’s many stumbles.

More

N2K_001bThe podcast this week is dominated by two subjects. First, the Bergdahl affair, and the general character of the Obama administration. And second, World War II, on this 70th anniversary of D-Day. Additionally, Jay makes a movie recommendation, and Mona a book recommendation. The podcast goes out with “I’ll Be Seeing You,” sung by Jo Stafford.

You can subscribe to Need To Know by clicking here. 

More

pic_giant_071513_SM_Picking-Tom-Cotton-Arkansas“Tom Cotton is perfect,” an Arkansas lady confided to Jay Nordlinger when he traveled to the state. “No, he’s not,” responded Mrs. Cotton, mother of the congressman and candidate for United States Senate, when Jay repeated the story to her later. Chatting with Jay and Mona, Tom Cotton endorses his mother’s view. See what you think. He seems to have it all: Harvard, military career, solid conservative values, wholesome life, sense of humor, good looks. He shares his thoughts about the campaign against Mark Pryor, how to answer accusations that Republicans want to throw widows and orphans into the snow, and what Republicans should do with the filibuster if they’re fortunate enough to gain the majority.

After Cotton’s departure, Jay and Mona mark the 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen massacre, chew over the election results in Europe, and agree that economics is key to maintaining our liberty.

More

NTK FeatureMona and Jay have a rollicking discussion, ranging from A to Z, or at least A to R. Among the personalities discussed are Elizabeth Warren, Ted Kennedy, Rand Paul, Narendra Modi, Marco Rubio, and Solzhenitsyn. Among the topics discussed are totalitarianism, anti-Semitism, the VA, student bodies, the courage of black conservatives, and baseball. Mona and Jay don’t solve many of the problems of the world, but they are pretty good at identifying and explaining them. The show ends with “America,” because Mona brings up the classic rhyme “I like the island Manhattan. / Smoke on your pipe and put that in.” (That is one of Jay’s favorites too – along with “Glory hallelujah, I give my praises to Ya,” which he learned from a Kirk Franklin song.)

Subscribe to Need To Know here. 

More

Stuart TaylorJay and Mona welcome Stuart Taylor, Jr. author of Mismatch: How Affirmative Action Hurts Students It’s Intended to Help, and Why Universities Won’t Admit It. They’ve both mentioned Stuart Taylor in the past and don’t stint on the opportunity to tell him just what they think of him to his face.

Affirmative action/race preferences are the topic for the first half hour, including a review of the Supreme Court’s recent decision regarding Michigan’s ban on the practice. In a particularly powerful passage, Taylor wonders at the presumption of Justice Sotomayor, who implied that all of her colleagues who disagreed with her don’t understand the issue of race in America. This – to Clarence Thomas.

More

NTK FeatureIn their latest episode, Mona and Jay talk about the scourge of widespread and chronic unemployment; the withdrawal of Condoleezza Rice from a commencement date; the Benghazi investigation; and other weighty matters. They also discuss the joys of language. Mona has been interested to learn lately that – ta-da! – saturated fats are good for you. Or at least not harmful. She is also faced, as a cello student, with learning a new clef. For her, that has been like castor oil, so far.

The exit music is a cello piece: the (exciting) finale of Tchaikovsky’s “Rococo” Variations, played by Leonard Rose and the Philadelphia Orchestra, conducted by Eugene Ormandy.

More

Everyone knows that the Republicans are the party of the rich, right? Matt Continetti, editor of the Washington Free Beacon, joins Jay and Mona to Continettidebunk this with gusto. He details Hillary Clinton’s cozy relationships with big donors, and provides the details about the lavish lifestyles of the rich and Democratic (the Podestas, to be exact). Nothing wrong with wealth of course, except when you’ve waxed prosperous entirely at the taxpayers’ expense.

Mona and Jay then offer a tour of useful idiots, starting with the late Gabriel Garcia Marquez, stopping by to wave at Edward Snowden, and finishing up with Jay Carney, who apparently thinks it’s cute to hang Soviet propaganda posters in his kitchen. Does he see himself as a propagandist perhaps?

More

Mona pauses in the preparation of matzah balls (that’s an actual, un-retouched photo of them, photographed in the their native habitat by Mona herself) to discuss lobbying with Jay. Not the virtuous, policy-oriented lobbying that is the lifeblood of democracy, but the smarmier kind that involves big business paying the well-connected (these days mostly Democrats, though Republicans are hardly pure) to impose disadvantages on their competitors.

Speaking of democracy, Jay and Mona agree that the Nevada stand-off attracting so much attention is not good for it.

More

This week, Mona and Jay talk about John Kerry and that chimera known as “the Middle East peace process.” The truth is sadly simple, they say: There will be peace the second the Arabs want to coexist – and not a second before. Then they chew over leftist nonsense on campus. Jay says that maybe we make too big a deal out of this nonsense; Mona quickly talks him out of it. Later, they discuss a Kennedy-family award to George Bush the Elder. You know how Democrats like their Republicans: dead or long retired. Finally, Mona and Jay go down Memory Lane a bit about Edwin Edwards, the Louisiana politician and rascal – who’s out of jail and runnin’ for office again.

Early in the podcast, they talk about Breaking Away, the 1979 movie set in Bloomington, Indiana. That movie uses Mendelssohn’s “Italian” Symphony, which is the music the podcast exits on.

More
  1. 1
  2. ...
  3. 6
  4. 7
  5. 8
  6. 9
  7. 10
  8. 11
  9. 12
  10. 13