To mark this historical day, we’ve assembled a panel that we think reflects all sides of the new Trump administration — a mashup of the Ricochet Podcast and Need To Know with Charen and Nordlinger with a dash of Victor Davis Hanson thrown in for flavoring. It’s a bracing conversation that really gets into the weeds on the election and what may lie ahead.

More

Please Support Our Sponsors!

National Review’s Ian Tuttle joins Jay and Mona to talk about BuzzFeed and the press, among many other things. They consider whether, on balance, the past few weeks have been good for conservatism. There were one and a half cheers for Rex Tillerson, and some full-throated enthusiasm for others. Does the cabinet matter, when DT is in the Oval? Jay and Mona differ.

The podcast closes with thoughts about the “real America.” 

More

Please Support Our Sponsors!

That’s what an Obama staffer asked when he/she saw the term “the least of these” in a memo about the proper policies on poverty. What a chasm separates the two parties! Which brings up Kerry, Putin, the UN anti-Israel vote, changes on the right (is it protectionist now?), and much more. We close with a special contribution from two much-appreciated listeners.

More

Please Support Our Sponsor!

Who doesn’t love Christmas music? Mona and Jay share some favorite tracks in a special holiday edition of the podcast.From Bach to Berlin, it’s a great journey.

The track list from this podcast may be viewed here.

More

Please Support Our Sponsors!

Steve Hayes, newly-appointed editor-in-chief of The Weekly Standard, joins Jay and Mona to talk about foreign policy (he was a terrific Benghazi reporter), what is detectable about the Trump approach, and the polarization of news and information.

Jay and Mona then mull over the CIA. Can they be political? Are they being political right now?

More

Please Support Our Sponsors!

So many issues seem to come down to that. Jay outs himself as a Trumpster (!). Mona talks climate and Al Gore. Who wants to eliminate the Electoral College? Depends. The duo also do a little music. Mona wants to know how not to hate modernism. Jay explains.

Music from this week’s episode: Lorin Maazel conducts Franck’s Symphony in D minor, M 48- III

More

Please Support Our Sponsors!

Mona and Jay talk about President-elect Trump and his cabinet-building. Also about Carrier, conservatism, and capitalism. And about the hunt for heretics: Do you now or have you ever belonged to a church that opposes same-sex marriage? There is also some talk about identity politics vs. art: Who will win? The outcome of that war is momentous. And there is an appreciation of the Queen of England, and her husband, Prince Philip.

The podcast goes out with some music from a ballet that Mona brings up, and that is especially popular this time of year. It is the Grand Pas de Deux from “The Nutcracker,” by Tchaikovsky.

More

Please Support Our Sponsors!

Henry Olsen of the Ethics and Public Policy Center joins to analyze the election results (Olsen was one of the few to predict the outcome within a point or two) and consider the big takeaways from 2016 about ethnic and working class voters. What matters more: identity or issues?

Jay and Mona then read the tea leaves emerging from Trump tower and Bedminster, NJ and offer some praise, some relief, and some alarm.

More

Please Support Our Sponsors!

The Catholics say hope is a theological virtue, and while none of the four participants in a special Need to Know is Catholic, all are upholding it this week.

Peter Wehner joined first, Wednesday morning, for reflections on the challenge to conservatives of a Trump presidency. On Thursday, Jay and Mona welcomed David French. They talk Supreme Court, Obamacare, and then, inevitably, foreign policy and character. It’s a bizarre stew, cooked up by history.

More

Please Support Our Sponsors!

Jay and Mona wonder what the next four years will look like now that the Republican Party has taken on so many of the features of the Democratic Party. Is demography destiny? Does anyone still uphold good character and deplore the “coarsening of the culture”? They close with light and dark: A note of fortitude about our task, and dark foreboding from Shostakovich.

Music from this week’s show: End of Shostakovich’s Fifth Symphony, Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Bernard Haitink

More

Please Support Our Sponsors!

Did Citizens United hand the US electoral system to nefarious corporate interests and “dark money”? We ask former FEC chairman and free speech advocate Bradley Smith. His lucid explication makes even this murky realm of the law very clear.

Jay and Mona then consider emotionalism, tribalism, and extremism in American politics. Also, is it just the women angle that makes Trump unacceptable? Bob Dylan gets a shout out that he might not like.

More

Please Support Our Sponsor!

Presidential historian Tevi Troy drops by to talk about crises. He’s written a book titled Shall We Wake the President? Wilson was a flop at responding to the 1918 flu, but Reagan responded well to the Tylenol poisoning case. This much is certain: Every president will have to respond to a crisis, so . . .

After Tevi departs Jay and Mona consider the crisis of the election and the hypocrisy of the right. How did we get here? Will we all come back together after November 8? 

More

Please Support Our Sponsors!

Note: This podcast was recorded before the Trump video story broke. 

Mona and Jay talk about him and her – you know, the major-party presidential nominees. They also talk about some other things: including the Nobel Peace Prize, Captive Nations Week, Bill Cosby, and music.

More

Please Support Our Sponsor!

The match of the century? Hardly. Jay and Mona speculate on which Republican could have done what Trump failed to do in the first debate – really take it to Hillary Clinton. They talk trade, Lewinsky, taxes (did Trump admit he doesn’t pay them?), “trickle down” economics, demeanor, and more. The closing music is emblematic of the Republican Party this year.

More

Please Support Our Sponsors!

It’s a Need to Know two-fer. First Mary Kissel of the Wall Street Journal editorial board joins Mona to talk trade, economics, Trump outsmarting the press, birtherism, and Venezuela. Then Jay joins to talk Baltic Nations, Mike Pence, “Chelsea” Manning, Colin Powell, a little baseball, and who’s deplorable.

Music from this week’s episode: Õnnis on Inimene – Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir

More

Please Support Our Sponsors!

Mona and Jay talk about Hillary and Trump – and Putin and some other unsavory folks. Conservatives are strong on freedom and strong against dictators, right? The hosts also talk about the outcome of the election: Big Hillary win? Little Hillary win? Little Trump win? Big Trump win? Who knows?

Near the end of the podcast, they talk about two movies, one concerning the First Couple, the other concerning a pilot hero. And they close with comments on two figures out of the musical-entertainment past: Victor Borge and Peter Schickele.

More

Please Support Our Sponsors!

Evan McMullin, independent candidate for president, joins Jay and Mona with surprisingly encouraging news about his efforts to offer a choice to those dismayed and disgusted by Trump/Clinton. He explains the p’s and q’s of ballot access and write-in campaigns and then talks some policy.

Jay and Mona then mull their mixed feelings about banning the burkini. They discuss Georgetown’s affirmative action for the descendants of slaves the university sold generations ago, a teacher who denied Shakespeare to her “diverse” students, a few words about a truly heroic doctor, Denis Mukwege, and some reflections on childhood in the summertime.

More

Please Support Our Sponsors!

WTMJ’s Charlie Sykes – the radio host whose incisive interview with Donald Trump before the Wisconsin primary made headlines around the world — joins Jay and Mona to discuss how a conservative non-Trumpian copes with the Alice Through the Looking Glass world we’re in.

Jay and Mona then catch up on some Hillary anathematizing. A certain university gets some praise, along with another podcaster.

More

Please Support Our Sponsors!

A two-part Need to Know this week begins with the American Enterprise Institute’s James C. Capretta, who knows everything there is to know about Obamacare and related questions. Mona asks him about the Aetna decision to withdraw from exchanges and what the state of the law is generally. He’s not optimistic, but then, who is?

Jay then joins from Salzburg (within sight of Mozart’s home) to discuss Louisiana flooding, Bill Clinton, music, what we expect of politics, and many other subjects. The one topic not covered: Trump. Everyone needs a break from time to time.

More

Please Support Our Sponsors!

That was the name of a Mel Brooks flick. And that’s how many people think of Election 2016 – including Mona and Jay. They go over the latest. Trump and Hillary. The media. McMullin, Johnson, and Stein (yes, Stein). At the end, the hosts leave off politics to talk about an extraordinary incident in Rome – involving a quarreling old couple and their tender, sweet treatment by the police. The closing music is Respighi’s “Pines of Rome,” conducted by the great Fritz Reiner, leading his Chicago band.

More

Please Support Our Sponsors!

  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
  6. 6
  7. 7
  8. ...
  9. 13