National Affairs assistant editors Devorah Goldman and Daniel Wiser, Jr., talk with Philip Jeffery about his essay on an American cultural agenda from our Summer 2019 issue.

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The conservative legal movement is in the midst of a great debate about its future. For decades, originalism — the idea that the original meaning of the Constitution is binding on today’s interpreters — has been the default theory of legal conservatism, and so it remains. But the meaning of originalism is now in flux, as novel theories have challenged longstanding beliefs about its core philosophical premises. In this podcast, attorney Joel Alicea discusses his essay from our Spring 2015 issue, which dealt with the varying interpretations of originalism and its future in the conservative legal movement.

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Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address surely stands with the Apology of Socrates and the Funeral Oration of Pericles among the great speeches offered at crucial civic moments in human history. It is familiar and justly famous to all Americans. But as Diana Schaub discusses in this podcast, it is precisely because we know it so well that it can be hard to appreciate the scope of its achievement. To truly understand how a statement so brief could run so deep and last so long, Schaub says that we must carefully consider its substance and structure, and its place in Lincoln’s thought.

This conversation is inspired by Diana’s essay from our Spring 2014 issue on Lincoln at Gettysburg. Read it here: https://www.nationalaffairs.com/publications/detail/lincoln-at-gettysburg

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