This episode begins with a meditation on “the people” – that phrase in the mouths of politicians left and right. We also hear some music: variations on “The People United Will Never Be Defeated!” Jay then talks about immigration, sports, and some other things. He ends with The Parade – the parade ordered up by President Trump, who was inspired by Bastille Day in Paris. Jay says, if there is to be a parade, at least let the music be good. We then hear some John Philip Sousa – specifically, a march that bears the name of a newspaper. It steps lively!

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Jay says that he likes a performer who rolls his own — that is, who writes music, in addition to performing it. He plays a fair amount of music on this show — and talks about the latest brouhaha over immigration, that sh**storm. He further talks about Trump’s tweeting. (“Tweet on, Mr. President,” he says.) He ends, however, the way he began, i.e., with music — played by a British heroine.

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Jim Mattis, the secretary of defense, put Jay in mind of Frederick the Great, the Prussian king — so we hear a flute sonata by that versatile monarch. Jay also tells a story involving “Smoke Gets in Your Eyes” — so we hear Benny Goodman play that famous melody on his clarinet. (We also hear Helen Forrest sing it.) Last, Jay eulogizes Ed Rowny, our great arms-negotiating general. Rowny idolized Paderewski, the Polish pianist and statesman — so we hear Paderewski in revolutionary music by his countryman, Chopin. A typically eclectic “Jaywalking.”

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Jay starts with a song, whose title William F. Buckley Jr. once used for a book. Then he gets into judges: What makes a good one? He continues with some “Trumpservations,” as he has called them in the past. And he ends with a letter from a musicologist who compares a quarterback of today, Tom Brady, to a composer of yesterday, and forever: Mozart.

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Jay begins with some music by precocious types: a Shostakovich piano trio, written when the composer was 17; the Mendelssohn Octet, written when the composer was 16 — that sort of thing. Then he talks some politics. He also gets into the bees — and the birds and the bees. (He tells a love story.) He ends with what he calls “probably the most glorious shout I know” — a Christmas song.

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Jay begins with some guitar music — played by Sharon Isbin. Then tells a story about William F. Buckley Jr. and Isbin. He goes on with commentary on Jerusalem, the NFL, Theresa May (two Theresa Mays, actually), and more. He ends with music, offering one of the most beautiful, and hauntingly beautiful, songs ever written.

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In this episode, Jay asks the ancient question, Can music mean anything? Music without words, that is? He then gets into war criminals — who kill themselves or try to. We also get U.S. presidents, North Korean dictators, television blowhards, and more. Jay ends with some music — as composed by a twelve-year-old girl.

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In this episode, Jay talks about Tolstoy and his relationship to music. Could he write more than words? Then he talks taxes – which he likes on the flat side. Also, has there been a shift in conservatism? Away from limited government and personal responsibility, and in the direction of “What’re you gonna do for me?” Other subjects include Mugabe, Romney, and a curious knitter onstage.

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In this second episode of Jaywalking, Jay Nordlinger plays some music from Massenet’s Thaïs, including the Meditation, which is how the episode gets its name. Jay also talks about Fritz Kreisler and Fritz Crisler (a legendary violinist and a legendary football coach, respectively). Then he’s got Nazis, slavery, North Korea, and other cheerful stuff. He ends with genuine cheer, however: the American Dream and more music.

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