Following the so-called “trial of the century” that led to the 5’6″ Mexican drug lord Joaquin Guzman Loera, better known as El Chapo, his wife, Emma Coronel Aispuro, who’s 30 years his junior, was arrested at Dulles International Airport just outside Washington D.C. in February on drug trafficking charges. After El Chapo received a life sentence plus 30 years for his crimes, the Department of Justice is right on the heels of the Sinaloa Cartel with this latest arrest. But is it enough to take down one of Mexico’s most notorious and dangerous drug cartels?

My guest today is Jerry Dunleavy, he’s a Justice Department reporter with the Washington Examiner.

On today’s show, we’re going to discuss the case of El Chapo, the case that’s being built against his wife, and where American law enforcement is in the fight against these transnational criminal organizations.

“Hashing it Out” is a podcast hosted by Siraj Hashmi, Washington Examiner’s commentary video editor and writer. Each episode includes a political guest to offer historical context of the news and politics of the day and insight into how we got to where we are. If you want to find the deeper meaning behind current events, then “Hashing it Out” is the podcast for you.

Following the departure of President Donald Trump from the White House, the conservative movement has reached a fork in the road. On the one hand, it could continue down the path of Trumpism and lean into its nationalist populist ideology or, on the other, return to its more neoconservative roots of free-market capitalism and interventionist foreign policy. Either way, despite being the opposition party in 2021, conservatives find themselves in what many might argue as a familiar, yet comfortable position.

My guest today is Jane Coaston, she’s the host of “The Argument” with the New York Times.

On today’s show, we’re going to discuss the direction conservatism is heading in a post-Trump world, who takes up the mantle after Trump, and what we can expect on the horizon for the Right.

“Hashing it Out” is a podcast hosted by Siraj Hashmi, Washington Examiner’s commentary video editor and writer. Each episode includes a political guest to offer historical context of the news and politics of the day and insight into how we got to where we are. If you want to find the deeper meaning behind current events, then “Hashing it Out” is the podcast for you.

As part of the $2.3 trillion COVID relief bill that was passed by Congress and signed into law by President Trump in December 2020, the Pentagon has six months to release information about its UFO Task Force. Despite the fact that the government has been tight-lipped about UFOs, in 2020, the Pentagon formally released three videos of what they call “Unidentified Aerial Phenomena” that were previously reported by the New York Times in 2017. With these developments, are we finally getting an answer to the question of whether or not we’re alone in the universe? My guest today is Tom Rogan, he’s a commentary writer with the Washington Examiner. On today’s show, we’re going to discuss the fascination and drive to uncover the truth about UFOs and UAPs, what we can ascertain from the information that’s been released so far, and whether the government will deliver the Earth-shattering goods.

On what seemed like a quiet week following the Inauguration of President Biden, all eyes turned to Wall Street where a group of investors, known as Wall Street Bets on the website Reddit, assembled to completely catch everyone and their money off guard. By dumping their money into so-called “meme stocks,” companies like GameStop, AMC, and Blackberry saw their stock price surge by as much as 1,000%, creating a short squeeze. Hedge fund managers who were shorting the stock had to buy up these stocks to cover their losses, driving up the price even further. The market became so volatile that the stock trading app Robinhood notably had to temporarily halt trading. With these meme stocks seeing a massive decline since, what really happened to cause this type of chaos? My guest today is Kate Hyde, she’s an independent stock trader and contributor to the Spectator. On today’s show, we’re going to discuss the short squeeze, how the government is responding to it, what happened with Robinhood, and what’s on the horizon for Wall Street.

QAnon has taken a foothold in the American political dynamic unlike any conspiracy theory in recent memory. The big tent conspiracy theory that only used to exist on the fringe of the far-right seems to have gone mainstream as exemplified through the election of Donald Trump. Over the course of the last four years, Trump’s presidency gave rise to a movement that seeks to expose a global Satan-worshipping cabal of pedophiles and hold them accountable. And Trump was purportedly the only person willing to do it. So, what exactly is QAnon? My guest today is Travis View, he’s the host of the QAnon Anonymous podcast. On today’s show, we’re going to discuss the QAnon conspiracy theory, what they believe, what motivates them, and how it’s become such a destructive force in American politics.

Joe Biden was sworn in on Wednesday, January 20th as the 46th President of the United States, and he’s already hit the ground running. In his first day in Office, President Biden signed 17 executive orders, many of which were direct reversals of the Trump administration. The political dynamic in Washington has changed dramatically in just a few days. Is this a return to politics as usual or is America far beyond the point of no return? My guest today is Naomi Lim, she’s a White House reporter with the Washington Examiner who previously covered the Biden 2020 campaign. On today’s show, we’re going to discuss President Biden’s agenda, what he and Vice President Harris can realistically get done in Washington, and how these next four years will be different from the previous four. “Hashing it Out” is a podcast hosted by Siraj Hashmi, Washington Examiner’s commentary video editor and writer. Each episode includes a political guest to offer historical context of the news and politics of the day and insight into how we got to where we are. If you want to find the deeper meaning behind current events, then “Hashing it Out” is the podcast for you.

In the immediate aftermath of the riot on Capitol Hill on January 6th, the House voted to impeach President Trump, making him the first president ever to be impeached twice by the House of Representatives. Yet, in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic, many Americans are still struggling and Congress fails to deliver anything beneficial to its constituents, opting to impeach the president first. Are their priorities in order and is there any hope that things will get better? My guest today is Bridget Phetasy, she’s a comedian, writer, and host of the podcasts “Dumpster Fire” and “Walk-Ins Welcome.” On today’s show, we’re going to discuss how we got to this point as a country, what problems still exist that have only gotten worse, and how we can turn the tide. “Hashing it Out” is a podcast hosted by Siraj Hashmi, Washington Examiner’s commentary video editor and writer. Each episode includes a political guest to offer historical context of the news and politics of the day and insight into how we got to where we are. If you want to find the deeper meaning behind current events, then “Hashing it Out” is the podcast for you.

January 6, 2021 was a chaotic and embarrassing day in our nation’s capital as pro-Trump rioters stormed into the Capitol Building, disrupting a joint session of Congress where members of the House and Senate were certifying the electoral college results from the 2020 presidential election. The riots left five people dead, including a Capitol Police officer. What actually happened in Washington? My guest today is Noam Blum, he’s an Associate Editor at Tablet Magazine. On today’s show, we’re going to discuss the events that took place on this day, the immediate fallout from it, and where we go from here. “Hashing it Out” is a podcast hosted by Siraj Hashmi, Washington Examiner’s commentary video editor and writer. Each episode includes a political guest to offer historical context of the news and politics of the day and insight into how we got to where we are. If you want to find the deeper meaning behind current events, then “Hashing it Out” is the podcast for you.
Weeks after Election Day, the Electoral College convened to affirm the win of President-Elect Joe Biden, yet President Trump has not shied away from his challenge to overturn the results, alleging widespread voter and election fraud. Some observers may think this is completely unprecedented, but they’d actually be wrong. There have actually been a number of contested elections from the presidential contests of 1876, 1960, and even 2000. What makes 2020 so different? My guest today is Richard Lim, he’s the host of This American President podcast. On today’s show, we’re going to discuss the parallels between the 2020 election and the contested elections of the past, what makes this most recent election unique, and whether the country will ever heal from this current divide. “Hashing it Out” is a podcast hosted by Siraj Hashmi, Washington Examiner’s commentary video editor and writer. Each episode includes a political guest to offer historical context of the news and politics of the day and insight into how we got to where we are. If you want to find the deeper meaning behind current events, then “Hashing it Out” is the podcast for you.
It’s been a month since the 2020 presidential election, and it just keeps dragging on and on. Yet, there’s a schism occurring in the GOP. While Democrats are fighting each other over control of the party, Republicans are deeply divided over the results of the election altogether, mainly centering on voter and election fraud derailing President Trump’s path to a second consecutive term. What’s going on here? My guest today is Noam Blum, he’s an Associate Editor at Tablet Magazine. On today’s show, we’re going to discuss what happened to create this divide in the GOP, what’s on the horizon for Trump and the Republicans, and how the political climate will change in the years to come. “Hashing it Out” is a podcast hosted by Siraj Hashmi, Washington Examiner’s commentary video editor and writer. Each episode includes a political guest to offer historical context of the news and politics of the day and insight into how we got to where we are. If you want to find the deeper meaning behind current events, then “Hashing it Out” is the podcast for you.
As President Trump and the Republican party push through with their legal challenges following the 2020 presidential election, the Democratic party is going through the autopsy report of the so-called “blue wave” that failed tremendously to meet their high expectations. While it looks like the presidency is secured, Democrats failed to take back the Senate, having to rely on two competitive Senate run-off races in Georgia, and even lost around a dozen or so seats in the House of Representatives. If results stand where they are, it will be almost impossible for a Democratic-controlled White House to impose their mandate. How did it even come to this? My guest today is Zaid Jilani, he’s a freelance writer and contributor to the Washington Examiner and Tablet Magazine. On today’s show, we’re going to discuss what exactly happened that made things so bittersweet for Democrats, how Trump and the GOP actually expanded their base with minority voters, and what the Democratic mandate looks like going forward. “Hashing it Out” is a podcast hosted by Siraj Hashmi, Washington Examiner’s commentary video editor and writer. Each episode includes a political guest to offer historical context of the news and politics of the day and insight into how we got to where we are. If you want to find the deeper meaning behind current events, then “Hashing it Out” is the podcast for you.
We’re living in two different Americas. In one America, Joe Biden has defeated Donald Trump in the 2020 presidential election. In the other, the presidential election is not only still ongoing, but also the fight to preserve election integrity is becoming more intense. While Trump has not conceded the race, he and his supporters argue that the main reasons Trump is down in the electoral college are because of false media projections and widespread voting irregularities and voter fraud that have benefitted the Democrats. Does Trump have a legitimate case that can overturn the current results? My guest today is Emily Larsen, she’s a political reporter with the Washington Examiner. On today’s show, we’re going to discuss the many different lawsuits being pushed by the Trump campaign, what examples of voter fraud could be corroborated, and whether Trump has a realistic shot at winning re-election.
Everyone says that this election, not last election, not the next election, but this one is the most consequential election in the history of our nation. You hear it a lot. You even heard it in the previous episode. But is the 2020 election really all that consequential? Depends on who you ask. For some observers, a few things will change here and there based on who wins between President Trump and Vice President Biden. But, for others, it could mean the end of America as we know it. My guest today is Dr. Jason Johnson, professor of politics and journalism at Morgan State University, MSNBC political analyst, writer for the Grio. In the previous episode, we wanted to find out what Trump stands to gain or lose with a victory in this year’s presidential election. On today’s show, we’re going to discuss what’s really at stake for Joe Biden, some of the biggest misconceptions surrounding his lengthy political career, and what a Biden administration could do. “Hashing it Out” is a podcast hosted by Siraj Hashmi, Washington Examiner’s commentary video editor and writer. Each episode includes a political guest to offer historical context of the news and politics of the day and insight into how we got to where we are. If you want to find the deeper meaning behind current events, then “Hashing it Out” is the podcast for you.
Everyone says that this election, not last election, not the next election, but this one is the most consequential election in the history of our nation. You hear it a lot. But is the 2020 election really all that consequential? Depends on who you ask. For some observers, a few things will change here and there based on who wins between President Trump and Vice President Biden. But, for others, it could mean the end of America as we know it. My guest today is Ryan Girdusky, he’s the author of “They’re Not Listening: How the Elites Created the Nationalist Populist Revolution.” On today’s show, we’re going to discuss some of the biggest misconceptions about the Trump presidency, what Trump needs to do to get himself past the finish line, and what’s really at stake in the 2020 election.
Voting. Everyone’s talking about it. Celebrities are even getting naked in public service announcements to try to convince you to vote in the upcoming presidential election. Even in the midst of early voting in the United States, there are accusations of voter fraud and voter suppression flying around. Are any of these accusations legitimate or do some not have a fundamental understanding of how voting and voting rights in America work? My guest today is Jessica Huseman, she’s a reporter at ProPublica and a CNN analyst. On today’s show, we’re going to discuss the progression of voting rights in America, the misinformation and disinformation surrounding voting, and whether or not any of these accusations of voter suppression are legitimate and will have a significant impact in the 2020 election.
Judge Amy Coney Barrett was nominated to the Supreme Court following the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. With only weeks until the 2020 presidential election, liberals and progressives have lambasted President Trump for attempting to fill the seat so close to Election Day. Those who oppose Barrett’s nomination view her as too extreme, highlighting either her Catholic faith or just that, by virtue, she’s a conservative woman and jurist who subscribes to the judicial philosophy of being both an originalist and a textualist, part of the Antonin Scalia school of thought. How would those judicial philosophies play out if confirmed? My guest today is Andrew Heaton, he’s a comedian, contributor for the libertarian publication, Reason Magazine, and host of the political and comedic podcast, “The Political Orphanage.” On today’s show, we’re going to discuss the differences between the judicial philosophies of originalism, textualism, and living constitutionalism, what Amy Coney Barrett’s hurdles are in the Senate confirmation process, and how the Supreme Court became so powerful and so politicized.
President Trump and Vice President Biden finally met face-to-face for the first presidential debate. It was a particularly chaotic affair as both candidates couldn’t stop interrupting each other and launched more insults than policy objectives. I mean, how important are debates really to winning a presidential election? Do either Trump or Biden really need to perform well in order to get elected? What does history tell us about presidential debates? Voters might want substance, but history says it’s mostly about style. My guest today is Richard Lim, he’s the host of the history podcast, “This American President.” On today’s show, we’re going to discuss how important that first presidential debate was, historical trends and correlations between debate performance and electoral victories, and whether or not the whole format has become obsolete.
Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg passed away at the age of 87 after a decade-long battle with pancreatic cancer. Perhaps during any other year, we’d be focusing on RBG’s legacy and her advocacy for women’s rights and gender equality, but this is an election year. And with Justice Ginsburg passing with just 46 days until the presidential election, the debate over President Trump nominating and confirming her replacement has already reached a fever pitch in Washington. For the GOP, filling the seat before the election is of the utmost importance with historical precedent. For Democrats, not only do they want to have the next president fill the vacancy, they’re calling the GOP hypocrites for their actions in 2016, threatening to pack the courts and abolish the filibuster, and even impeaching President Trump again. Who has history on their side? My guest today is Richard Lim, he’s the host of the history podcast, “This American President.” On today’s show, we’re going to discuss Ginsburg’s legacy, the historical precedent of filling a Supreme Court vacancy during an election year, and how this particular vacancy changes the 2020 election.
Wildfires are raging out west. As of this week, there are approximately 28 wildfires burning across California, destroying 3.3 million acres. In Oregon, 36 active fires have burned more than 1 million acres. And in Washington State, there have been a reported 1,458 fires that have burned over 800,000 acres of land. In addition to Utah, Nevada, Arizona, Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho, the wildfires have killed approximately three dozen people and displaced hundreds of thousands of others. Where is this all coming from? Depends on who you ask. If you were to ask California Gov. Gavin Newsom, the cause for all the fires is climate change straight up. If you were to ask President Trump, he’d put the onus on forest mismanagement. Who’s right in this debate? My guest today is Gabriella Hoffman, she’s host of the podcast, “District of Conservation,” and an award-winning outdoor writer whose columns you can find in TownHall.com. On today’s show, we’re going to discuss how conditions on the ground have made these wildfires so intense, what’s causing all of it, and how people on opposite sides of the spectrum can unite to address our many environmental problems.
China’s back in the news, and no, it’s not good news. After the release of the live-action film “Mulan,” Disney, in the end credits, offered “special thanks” to eight government entities in the Chinese province of Xinjiang, where over a million Uighur Muslims are being detained and face demographic genocide in modern-day concentration camps, operated by the Chinese Communist Party. Meanwhile, with less than two months until the presidential election, President Trump is openly pondering over the idea of decoupling the U.S. economy from China, an idea that many multi-national corporations aren’t taking seriously. So, what’s at stake? My guest today is Gordon Chang, he’s a columnist and author of “The Coming Collapse of China.” You can find him on Twitter @GordonGChang. On today’s show, we’re going to discuss how these global corporations have been lowering their standards for human rights to access the Chinese market, what it means to decouple from China, and how it would impact the United States down the road.