As bad as things are in Russia today, they may get worse, warns David Satter, author of The Less You Know, the Better You Sleep: Russia’s Road to Terror and Dictatorship under Yeltsin and Putin.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Satter explains why Americans and Westerners fail to understand Russia, whether Donald Trump is naive to think he can strike deals with Vladmir Putin, and what it’s like to be the first U.S. journalist since the Cold War to be expelled from Russia.

More

Is “e pluribus unum” a thing of the past? It doesn’t have to be, says Yuval Levin in The Fractured Republic: Renewing America’s Social Contract in the Age of Individualism.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Yuval Levin talks about how to revive federalism in the 21st century, why conservatives and liberals both must avoid a politics of nostalgia, and what he hopes to accomplish at his day job, which is editing the distinguished quarterly, National Affairs.

More

What Millennials don’t know about the Cold War can hurt them–and us, says Elizabeth Edwards Spalding, co-author (with Lee Edwards) of A Brief History of the Cold War.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Spalding describes what was at stake between the United States and the Soviet Union, the achievement of Ronald Reagan, and why statesmanship matters. She also tells what it was like to write a book with her dad.

More

Democrats claim that demography is destiny–and that it’s just a matter of time before they dominate American political life at almost every level. Historian Donald Critchlow says they’re wrong in his new book, Future Right: Forging a New Republican Majority.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Critchlow describes the GOP’s path to victory in the 21st century, whether Republicans have any chance of competing for the votes of millennials, and why Donald Trump isn’t the answer.

More

In a polarized Washington, can Democrats and Republicans work together on foreign policy? Can they let “politics stop at the water’s edge”? They once did, explains Lawrence J. Haas in Harry & Arthur: Truman, Vandenberg, and the Partnership That Created the Free World.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Hass describes the legacy of President Truman and Sen. Arthur Vandenberg, a Republican from Michigan who first spoke of the “water’s edge.” He discusses the early years of the Cold War, what today’s Democrats can learn from Truman, and what today’s Republicans–who are now courted by “American First” isolationist rhetoric–can learn from Vandenberg.

More

The biggest threat to American freedom is not economic inequality but economic immobility, says F.H. Buckley, author of The Way Back: Restoring the Promise of the American Dream.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Buckley says that economic immobility is the secret source of this year’s political turmoil, claims that Americans enjoy less freedom today than people in Canada and Denmark, and suggests a way for the next president to restore hope.

More

Ross Macdonald was one of the best writers of crime fiction in the 20th century says Tom Nolan, editor of Three Novels of the Early 1960s, the Library of America’s new edition of Macdonald’s influential work.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Nolan talks about the man behind the stories, defines “hardboiled” mystery fiction, and describes how Macdonald found inspiration in the legends and myths of ancient Greece.

More

Ty Cobb was one of the greatest baseball players in history–but everything you think that you know about his off-the-field behavior is probably wrong, according to Charles Leerhsen, author of Ty Cobb: A Terrible Beauty.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Leerhsen describes what made Cobb an outstanding player, insists that he wasn’t the racist lout of legend, and blames the film documentarian Ken Burns for much of the confusion.

More

The man who wrote the supply-side playbook for President Reagan is back with The Scandal of Money: Why Wall Street Recovers But the Economy Never Does.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, George Gilder describes what’s gone wrong with the U.S. economy, why the hope of returning to the gold standard is outdated, and who is the single 2016 presidential candidate with an actual understanding of the world’s chief financial problem.

More

Logan West wakes up, answers a dead man’s phone, and embarks on a rollicking adventure in one of this year’s hottest thrillers: Overwatch, by Matthew Betley.

In aoverwatch 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Betley describes how he went from serving in the Marines in Iraq to writing a novel, what he saw in Fallujah, and how his own battle with alcoholism helped him create his hero–in a book that Stephen Hayes of the Weekly Standard calls “an exceptional read.”

More

“In the storied history of American politics,” said Bill Clinton of George McGovern, “I believe that no other presidential candidate ever had such enduring impact in defeat.”

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, historian Thomas J. Knock–author of The Life and Times of George McGovern: The Rise of a Prairie Statesman–tells the tale of the left-wing Democrat who lost the presidential election in 1972. He also compares and contrasts McGovern to Barry Goldwater, discusses what today’s Democrats owe to McGovern, and describes what McGovern was like as a man.

More

Europe is in the grip of a soft despotism, says Todd Huizinga, author of The New Totalitarian Temptation: Global Governance and the Crisis of Democracy in Europe.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Huizinga describes where the European Union went wrong, what British voters should think about as they consider leaving the EU, and whether the United States is following the EU on the path to unaccountable governance.

More

“Imagine no posesssions,” crooned John Lennon. It would be a nightmare, says Christina Sandefur, co-author of Cornerstone of Liberty: Property Rights in 21st-Century America.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Sandefur explains why property rights are so important, how they’re under pressure from eminent domain and regulatory takings, and what we should make of Donald Trump’s record on them.

More

Noel Malcolm’s new book is about an old and forgotten Albanian family, but it’s much more interesting that it sounds — and Agents of Empire: Knights, Corsairs, Jesuits, and Spies in the Sixteenth-Century Mediterranean World is winning rave reviews in Britain and America.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Malcolm recounts the old-time conflict between East and West, as Ottomans and Venetians battled for supremacy. He also talks about the amazing archival detective work behind his engrossing story and describes what it’s like to work in the Vatican Library, the setting of many conspiracy-minded potboilers–and where he found a key document.

More

Thomas C. Leonard of Princeton University says that 20th-century Progressives weren’t the people you may have thought they were, in his new book Illiberal Reformers: Race, Eugenics, and American Economics in the Progressive Era.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Leonard talks 41zMhIbMYKLabout how the Progressives of yesteryear differ from the Progressives of today, whether eugenics really was central to their politics, and what lessons their experience holds for us now, at a time when we possess unprecedented powers to alter the human genome.

More

Abraham Lincoln is one of America’s best-loved presidents. Does he really need redemption? Allen C. Guelzo says yes, in his new book called, appropriately, Redeeming the Great Emancipator.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Guelzo explains why Lincoln suffers a barrage of attacks today, what motivated him to issue the Emancipation Proclamation, and whether he was a racist and an atheist.

More

Philanthropy is a $360 billion business. It’s also an example of American exceptionalism, says Karl Zinsmeister, author of The Almanac of American Philanthropy, a big book (more than 1300 pages), just published by the Philanthropy Roundtable.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Zinsmeister explains why Americans give more than people in other countries, whether small donors can make big differences, and why private philanthropy is essential to freedom.

More

Daniel Oppenheimer is no conservative, but he’s fascinated by the political conversions of people who’ve moved rightward over time, such as Whittaker Chambers, James Burnham, Ronald Reagan, Norman Podhoretz, David Horowitz, and Christopher Hitchens — and now he’s written a book about them, Exit Right: The People Who Left the Left and Reshaped the American Century.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Oppenheimer talks about how he became interested in their stories, what his subjects share in common, and whether he — a self-described leftist — is a target for conservative conversion.

More

Please Support Our Sponsor!

Bernard Cornwell says he’s writing “the tale of England’s making” through his series of historical novels known as the Saxon Tales. The latest one has just published, Warriors of the Storm.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Cornwell discusses the challenges of writing about England before the Norman Conquest of 1066, why he’s happy to let other writers control the BBC America television series based on his books, and how he wound up living in the United States as an American citizen.

More

Roger Scruton got in big trouble three decades ago for his bracing attack on left-wing intellectuals. Now he updates his classic book in a new edition, Fools, Frauds, and Firebrands: Thinkers of the New Left.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Scruton describes how a near riot broke out over his work in the 1980s and explains why discredited leftists are on the march again. Asked to define the proper role of an intellectual in society, he calls it a “jolly good question” (he’s British) and delivers an excellent answer.

More
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
  6. 6
  7. 7
  8. 8
  9. 9
  10. 10