Can Christianity save America? R.R. Reno, the editor of First Things, explains how it might in “Resurrecting the Idea of a Christian Society.”

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Reno describes why religious pluralism requires a Christian framework, why the United States has shifted away from its Christian roots, and whether churches bear any of the blame for the country’s current direction.

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When a day-care center refused to swaddle Abby Schachter‘s baby, the mother of four knew that she had crashed into the onerous rules of the nanny state. Now she’s written No Child Left Alone: Getting the Government Our of Parenting.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Schachter explains that the problem goes far beyond swaddling. She also describes “free-range kids,” talks about bike helmets and vaccines, and argues for letting parents have more control over how they raise their children.

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Joining us from the devastated city of Homs in Syria is Marwa al-Sabouni, author of The Battle for Home: The Vision of a Young Architect in Syria.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, al-Sabouni describes what life is like in Syria today, how architecture contributed to her county’s problems, and how a Syrian woman comes to speak English and become an architect. She also talks about her relationship to Roger Scruton, who wrote the foreword to her book.

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John Lloyd Stephens and Frederick Catherwood were like Indiana Jones–except that they were real people rather than Hollywood fantasies, and William Carlsen tells their tale in Jungle of Stone: The True Story of Two Men, Their Extraordinary Journey, and the Discovery of the Lost Civilization of the Maya.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Carlsen describes what these adventurers and archaeologists accomplished in the 1830s and 1840s, and also discusses the achievement of Maya civilization as well as why it vanished long ago.

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It’s perhaps the easiest problem in America to ignore: the grinding poverty and dysfunction of Indian reservations–and Naomi Schaefer Riley gives it every bit of her attention in The New Trail of Tears: How Washington Is Destroying American Indians.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Riley explains how the federal government makes life worse for these citizens, why property rights and better schools are part of the solution, and what 21st-century Americans owe to a group of people that Washington has abused for a long time.

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“A young man who wishes to remain a sound atheist cannot be too careful of his reading,” wrote C.S. Lewis. That’s probably true, especially because the young man might read Lewis’s own Mere Christianity, a book that has proven so influential it now has its own “biographer” in George M. Marsden, author of C.S. Lewis’s Mere Christianity: A Biography.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Mardsen explains how Lewis turned a set of radio broadcasts into an enduring work of apologetics, what made Lewis such a good writer, and why Mere Christianity is more popular today than ever before.

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daniel silva black widowWhat happens when an espionage novelist predicts the future? Daniel Silva found out as he wrote his new thriller, The Black Widow, whose story involves ISIS attacks in Paris and Brussels, European anti-Semitism, and the war in Syria.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Silva describes his series hero–Israeli art-restorer-turned-spy Gabriel Allon–and discusses why he thinks threats in the Middle East will grow much worse before they get any better.

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“There is no substitute for victory,” says Arthur Herman, in his revisionist biography, Douglas MacArthur: American Warrior.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Herman explains why the time is right for a new biography of the famous general, whether President Truman was right to fire MacArthur during the Korean War, and what MacArthur would make of America’s geopolitical challenges in the 21st century.

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Hillary Clinton once condemned “a vast right-wing conspiracy,” but nowadays we should worry more about “a vast left-wing conspiracy” of IRS agents, state prosecutors, and political activists, says Kimberley Strassel of the Wall Street Journal, author of The Intimidation Game: How the Left Is Silencing Free Speech.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Strassel describes why liberals are so worked up about the Citizens United case, defends the use of so-called dark money, and questions the value of transparency in everything.

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President Obama recently said he was “so proud” of the Black Lives Matter movement–but in fact he fails to understand the worst problems of criminal justice, says Heather Mac Donald, author of The War on Cops: How the New Attack on Law and Order Makes Everyone Less Safe.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Mac Donald describes what’s wrong with the claims of Black Lives Matter activists, defines the “Ferguson Effect” (a term she coined), and discusses the merits of proposals to put body cameras on police officers.

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The story starts with an attack on Americans near the Syrian border–and then Foreign Agent, the latest thriller from Brad Thor, embarks on a new globetrotting, ripped-from-the-headlines adventure with series hero Scot Harvath.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Thor talks about how he incorporates world events into his tales, whether suspending visas from Muslim countries is a good idea, and what he thinks of the 2016 presidential election.

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Conservatives on the state level are rethinking imprisonment, says Steven Teles, co-author (with David Dagan) of Prison Break: Why Conservatives Turned Against Mass Incarceration.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Teles explains why our polarized politics have created an opportunity for reform, whether new policies will cause crime rates to rise, and how liberal views about crime and prisons also have changed over the last generation.

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As bad as things are in Russia today, they may get worse, warns David Satter, author of The Less You Know, the Better You Sleep: Russia’s Road to Terror and Dictatorship under Yeltsin and Putin.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Satter explains why Americans and Westerners fail to understand Russia, whether Donald Trump is naive to think he can strike deals with Vladmir Putin, and what it’s like to be the first U.S. journalist since the Cold War to be expelled from Russia.

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Is “e pluribus unum” a thing of the past? It doesn’t have to be, says Yuval Levin in The Fractured Republic: Renewing America’s Social Contract in the Age of Individualism.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Yuval Levin talks about how to revive federalism in the 21st century, why conservatives and liberals both must avoid a politics of nostalgia, and what he hopes to accomplish at his day job, which is editing the distinguished quarterly, National Affairs.

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What Millennials don’t know about the Cold War can hurt them–and us, says Elizabeth Edwards Spalding, co-author (with Lee Edwards) of A Brief History of the Cold War.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Spalding describes what was at stake between the United States and the Soviet Union, the achievement of Ronald Reagan, and why statesmanship matters. She also tells what it was like to write a book with her dad.

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Democrats claim that demography is destiny–and that it’s just a matter of time before they dominate American political life at almost every level. Historian Donald Critchlow says they’re wrong in his new book, Future Right: Forging a New Republican Majority.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Critchlow describes the GOP’s path to victory in the 21st century, whether Republicans have any chance of competing for the votes of millennials, and why Donald Trump isn’t the answer.

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In a polarized Washington, can Democrats and Republicans work together on foreign policy? Can they let “politics stop at the water’s edge”? They once did, explains Lawrence J. Haas in Harry & Arthur: Truman, Vandenberg, and the Partnership That Created the Free World.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Hass describes the legacy of President Truman and Sen. Arthur Vandenberg, a Republican from Michigan who first spoke of the “water’s edge.” He discusses the early years of the Cold War, what today’s Democrats can learn from Truman, and what today’s Republicans–who are now courted by “American First” isolationist rhetoric–can learn from Vandenberg.

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The biggest threat to American freedom is not economic inequality but economic immobility, says F.H. Buckley, author of The Way Back: Restoring the Promise of the American Dream.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Buckley says that economic immobility is the secret source of this year’s political turmoil, claims that Americans enjoy less freedom today than people in Canada and Denmark, and suggests a way for the next president to restore hope.

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Ross Macdonald was one of the best writers of crime fiction in the 20th century says Tom Nolan, editor of Three Novels of the Early 1960s, the Library of America’s new edition of Macdonald’s influential work.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Nolan talks about the man behind the stories, defines “hardboiled” mystery fiction, and describes how Macdonald found inspiration in the legends and myths of ancient Greece.

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Ty Cobb was one of the greatest baseball players in history–but everything you think that you know about his off-the-field behavior is probably wrong, according to Charles Leerhsen, author of Ty Cobb: A Terrible Beauty.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Leerhsen describes what made Cobb an outstanding player, insists that he wasn’t the racist lout of legend, and blames the film documentarian Ken Burns for much of the confusion.

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The man who wrote the supply-side playbook for President Reagan is back with The Scandal of Money: Why Wall Street Recovers But the Economy Never Does.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, George Gilder describes what’s gone wrong with the U.S. economy, why the hope of returning to the gold standard is outdated, and who is the single 2016 presidential candidate with an actual understanding of the world’s chief financial problem.

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Logan West wakes up, answers a dead man’s phone, and embarks on a rollicking adventure in one of this year’s hottest thrillers: Overwatch, by Matthew Betley.

In aoverwatch 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Betley describes how he went from serving in the Marines in Iraq to writing a novel, what he saw in Fallujah, and how his own battle with alcoholism helped him create his hero–in a book that Stephen Hayes of the Weekly Standard calls “an exceptional read.”

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“In the storied history of American politics,” said Bill Clinton of George McGovern, “I believe that no other presidential candidate ever had such enduring impact in defeat.”

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, historian Thomas J. Knock–author of The Life and Times of George McGovern: The Rise of a Prairie Statesman–tells the tale of the left-wing Democrat who lost the presidential election in 1972. He also compares and contrasts McGovern to Barry Goldwater, discusses what today’s Democrats owe to McGovern, and describes what McGovern was like as a man.

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Europe is in the grip of a soft despotism, says Todd Huizinga, author of The New Totalitarian Temptation: Global Governance and the Crisis of Democracy in Europe.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Huizinga describes where the European Union went wrong, what British voters should think about as they consider leaving the EU, and whether the United States is following the EU on the path to unaccountable governance.

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“Imagine no posesssions,” crooned John Lennon. It would be a nightmare, says Christina Sandefur, co-author of Cornerstone of Liberty: Property Rights in 21st-Century America.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Sandefur explains why property rights are so important, how they’re under pressure from eminent domain and regulatory takings, and what we should make of Donald Trump’s record on them.

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