What to make of California’s economic health, its new governor and the state’s role as the lead in the anti-Trump “resistance?” Lee Ohanian, a Hoover Institution senior fellow and contributor to Hoover’s “California On Your Mind” twice-weekly column, talks about the latest doings in the Golden State.

Check out California on Your Mind here: https://www.hoover.org/publications/californiaonyourmind

More

The leading cause of death in the US after heart disease and cancer: “unintentional injuries,” including opioid-related fatalities. US Department of Health and Human Services Deputy Secretary Eric Hargan explains how the Trump Administration aims to limit the opioid scourge, plus other ways to reverse Americans’ shrinking longevity.

 

More

Granting 16-years-old the right to vote, abolishing the Electoral College, reshaping the makeup of the Supreme Court, states entering a voting compact? All are proposals championed and floated by a left still smarting from the 2016 election. David Davenport, a Hoover Institution research fellow specializing in constitution federalism and Americans politics and law, discusses why one of these reforms is more feasible than the others – and the need for a renewed emphasis on civics education.

 

More

As economically devastating as this decade’s hurricanes and wildfires have been, the US is looking at even worse scenarios in the years ahead. Alice Hill, a Hoover Institution research fellow focusing on building resilience to catastrophic events, discusses how the nation can better plan for the inevitable, plus the latest on the Trump Administration, Democrats, and the climate-change debate.

More

Who supports a wall-for-legalization deal on immigration? The Trump base – more so than Republicans in general. That’s one of the nonconventional findings in a Hoover-YouGov poll on immigration reform. Tim Kane, the Hoover Institution’s J.P. Conte Fellow in Immigration Studies, discusses his survey’s data and the prospects on an immigration solution in a divided Washington.

More

Two years into his presidency, Washington, DC, is not Donald Trump’s town ceremonially or stylistically – which is how the 45th president wants it. Michael Franc, director of the Hoover Institution’s research and initiatives program in the nation’s capital and a former congressional aide, discusses why DC is in fact Trump’s town for driving debate – and changes on Capitol Hill following the Democratic takeover of the House of Representatives.

 

More

A Trump veto of a congressional rejection of his “national emergency” declaration means another controversy that could be settled by the Supreme Court – which in turns means Chief Justice Roberts as a potential swing vote. Hoover research fellow Adam White discusses whether Roberts, who’s disappointed conservatives of late, is the most influential individual in a divided Washington.

More

A baker’s-dozen Democrats have launched presidential efforts; another dozen are weighing a run. Is it a sign that President Trump is easy pickings – or is it a sign that the Democratic party is undergoing an identity crisis? David Brady and Doug Rivers, Hoover senior fellows and Stanford political scientists, examine the state of the 2020 race.

More

Decades ago, a California teachers’ union executive described the notion of educators walking a picket line as “inappropriate, unprofessional, illegal, outmoded, and ineffective.” Paul Peterson, a Hoover Institution senior fellow and director of the Program on Education Policy and Governance at Harvard, explains why that’s no longer the case as teachers coast to coast have walked out of their classrooms over the past year.

More

On the 210th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s birthday, some have suggested that United States faces a second “civil war” – a conflict over culture, economics, and world view. Victor Davis Hanson, the Hoover Institution’s Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow, contrasts the hands dealt to Abraham Lincoln and Donald Trump.

More

Six years ago, as US Secretary of State, John Kerry declared an end to the Monroe Doctrine and US dominance of the Latin America. Hoover visiting fellow Markos Kounalakis suggests that the Trump Administration’s response to the constitutional crisis in Venezuela – economic sanctions, the outside chance of military intervention – is an indicator the doctrine is alive and kicking.

More

Constitutional law is frequently thrown around as a justification without people fulling understanding the document. From Speaker Pelosi believing she’s President Trump’s co-equal, to air traffic controllers demanding pay and senators wanting to know more about the president’s finances, constitutional law often arises. But are any of those justifications valid? Richard Epstein, the Hoover Institution’s Peter and Kirsten Bedford Senior Fellow and the voice behind “The Libertarian” podcast, examines what the Constitution does and doesn’t allow in terms of executive power and impeachment proceedings.

More

Now in its record third week, the partial shutdown of the federal government casts a long shadow over the new Congress and the nascent Democratic presidential field. But has it affected President Trump’s popularity? David Brady, the Hoover Institution’s Davies Family Senior Fellow and a Stanford University public policy professor, reviews the polling evidence.

 

More

In 2018, the House went Democratic and the Senate remained Republican – both, as expected. Now, the presidential cycle begins. Hoover senior fellows and Stanford political scientists David Brady and Douglas Rivers, conductors of a recount poll on political trends, discuss what 2018 told us about American politics, the health of the Trump presidency, and what to look for in the new year.

 

More

In China’s western Xinjiang territory, that country’s Uighur population finds itself banished to “re-education” camps in order to shed its Muslim faith and conform with Chinese ways. Michael Auslin, the Hoover Institution’s Hoover’s Williams-Griffis Fellow in Contemporary Asia, discusses the Trump Administration’s policy options and China’s ongoing efforts to stifle multiculturalism.

More

As a prolific columnist and observer of U.S. and world affairs, Niall Ferguson has plenty to be grateful for, beginning with an American president seemingly always in the news. Ferguson, the Milbank Family Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, explains the many reasons why Americans should be giving thanks this holiday season.

 

More

A year ago, public protests in Iran put the future of that repressive regime in doubt. With new sanctions in place and protestors again taking to the street to demonstrate against economic conditions (and new US sanctions), will 2019 witness a sea change in the Persian Gulf? Abbas Milani, a Hoover research fellow and the Hamid & Christina Moghadam Director of Iranian Studies at Stanford University, offers his thoughts.

 

More

The Trump Administration’s first post-midterm controversy: the constitutionality of the president’s choice for acting attorney general. John Yoo, a Hoover Institution visiting fellow and UC-Berkeley law professor, discusses the policy and political ramifications. And he breaks down the admissions lawsuit filed against his alma mater, Harvard, alleging discrimination against Asian applicants.

 

More

A departure from the usual Area 45 podcast: instead of discussing the 45th president, we take a closer look at the 31st state in the union – California. Lee Ohanian, a Hoover Institution senior fellow and UCLA economist, discusses what motivated him to launch Hoover’s new “California On Your Mind” journal and what challenges confront the Golden State’s next governor.

More
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
  6. 6