The “Maltese Falcon” is a groundbreaking movie and a seminal work of American literature. It’s more than pop culture, though it is pop culture at its finest. It’s also a tale of what it takes to be a man in America. In this episode of “Young Heretics,” Spencer Klavan defends the work’s place in the canon and analyzes its enduring greatness.

Subscribe to Young Heretics in Apple Podcasts (and leave a 5-star review, please!), or by RSS feed. For all our podcasts in one place, subscribe to the Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed in Apple Podcasts or by RSS feed.

There are 4 comments.

Become a member to join the conversation. Or sign in if you're already a member.
  1. Rick Banyan Member

    I enjoyed the program, but a little editing is required. You repeated material in the middle of the podcast (although I did like hearing your Peter Lorre impersonation twice).

    • #1
    • October 21, 2020, at 12:34 AM PDT
    • Like
  2. Jim Wright Coolidge

    Always a pleasure to listen to and learn from Spencer. 

    • #2
    • October 21, 2020, at 12:07 PM PDT
    • 1 like
  3. Mark Alexander Lincoln

    I’d seen The Maltese Falcon on TV and DVD, but I did not grasp its humor until I saw the film in an art theater in Palo Alto, CA, and the audience laughed at all the right places. It’s amazing what we miss without a live audience in a theater.

    • #3
    • October 30, 2020, at 2:51 PM PDT
    • 1 like
  4. HankRhody Freelance Philosopher Contributor

    Mark Alexander (View Comment):

    I’d seen The Maltese Falcon on TV and DVD, but I did not grasp its humor until I saw the film in an art theater in Palo Alto, CA, and the audience laughed at all the right places. It’s amazing what we miss without a live audience in a theater.

    Whaddaya want me to do? Learn to stutter?

    Sorry. Sam Spade quote.

    The “I’m turning you in” scene is my favorite love scene in all of film. Hopeless romantic that I am.

    • #4
    • November 4, 2020, at 3:45 AM PST
    • 1 like