In another first for this podcast, Jack gets a priest onto the show, Fr. Brendan Glasgow of St. Peter’s on Capitol Hill. Fr. Brendan is 27, only slightly older than Jack himself. So Jack asks this eminently trustable (since younger than 30) fellow what it’s like to be a Millennial priest, why he became one so young, and…whether he watched SpongeBob when he was growing up. The important questions, in other words.

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  1. Patrick McClure Coolidge
    Patrick McClure
    @Patrickb63

    Fr. Brendan, my son is trying to discern whether he has a vocation and plans to attend seminary for a year after college. I am both happy and scared for him. Thanks for the picture behind the collar you provided.

    • #1
  2. colleenb Member
    colleenb
    @colleenb

    Enjoyed the interview with Fr. Glasgow. I will alert the Ricochet Catholics if I can figure out how to do it. As I am in the DC area, it was interesting to hear more about the St. John Paul II Seminary.

    • #2
  3. colleenb Member
    colleenb
    @colleenb

    @PatrickMcClure:

    Patrick McClure (View Comment):

    Fr. Brendan, my son is trying to discern whether he has a vocation and plans to attend seminary for a year after college. I am both happy and scared for him. Thanks for the picture behind the collar you provided.

    Congratulations on raising a fine young man. My son and daughter-in-law both briefly visited orders to make sure that marriage was indeed their vocation. I hope he will listen to this podcast and speak with as many good priests as possible. I will pray for him.

    • #3
  4. Patrick McClure Coolidge
    Patrick McClure
    @Patrickb63

    @colleenb, thanks for the prayers. I had an uncle who was a priest, my mom’s brother. I saw up close both how rewarding and how taxing being a priest is. That is why I am both happy and scared for my son. But if G-d leads him to the priesthood, He will provide my son the strength to carry the load. But even though I know that, I have a hard time leaving all of this in G-d’s hands. As for his raising, I give my wife the credit.

    • #4
  5. colleenb Member
    colleenb
    @colleenb

    Patrick McClure (View Comment):

    @colleenb, thanks for the prayers. I had an uncle who was a priest, my mom’s brother. I saw up close both how rewarding and how taxing being a priest is. That is why I am both happy and scared for my son. But if G-d leads him to the priesthood, He will provide my son the strength to carry the load. But even though I know that, I have a hard time leaving all of this in G-d’s hands. As for his raising, I give my wife the credit.

    Obviously you are a wise man as wives (speaking as a wife) should always get the credit. Yes I can imagine for you both as parents it is both joyful and terrifying.

    • #5
  6. Full Size Tabby Member
    Full Size Tabby
    @FullSizeTabby

    Although I am neither a “young” American nor a Catholic, as an active Protestant I have been close friends with a number of pastors. I have found that many Americans do not seem to grasp that pastors and priests are humans with whom they can have conversations like any other human about topics like sports, music, movies, food, etc. Somehow a disturbing number of people seem to think they can talk to a pastor or priest only about “spiritual” things.

    My favorite personal experience with a Catholic priest was playing croquet (and drinking beer) at a friend’s house with his Catholic priest who was wearing a Star Wars themed shirt that his (the priest’s) sister had given him because he was a Star Wars fan. Priests have a special calling from God, but they are humans who bring their full humanity to their calling.

    • #6
  7. Full Size Tabby Member
    Full Size Tabby
    @FullSizeTabby

    Another misconception I find people have is that they don’t realize how much work a pastor or priest puts in besides leading worship: Visiting parishioners who are sick or hurting; counseling parishioners; preparing the sermon or homily; maintaining relationships with other churches and with community leaders and groups other than the church; and plain old administration (staff and facilities management, congregational committees, denominational committees).

    • #7