Coach Tea is back for a frank conversation with Bridget about George Floyd, the protests, the riots, the looting, the Black Lives Matter movement, and the concept of white privilege. They discuss the frustration that a real issue has become a Trojan horse for all sorts of other agendas, how the movement has been co-opted, why solutions need to be personal and not legislated, and the problem with the argument “if you’re silent, you’re part of the problem.” They cover how capitalism fights racism, why the phrase “for the greater good” is so terrifying, how insanity is always louder than sanity, and the underlying insult inherent in white people apologizing for their privilege.

**Warning** This episode is not for the easily offended and is more explicit than usual

 

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  1. Patrick McClure Coolidge

    Rioters and looters taking pictures of themselves are no different than the lynch mobs taking pictures with the hanged victims or Nazis taking pictures of themselves with looted artwork or murdered “untermenschen”.

    • #1
    • June 5, 2020, at 9:44 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
    • This comment has been edited.
  2. Jim Wright Coolidge

    Entertaining, inspiring, and infuriating. The length of this episode was daunting, but I’m glad I chose to listen.

    • #2
    • June 5, 2020, at 10:12 AM PDT
    • 3 likes
  3. dicentra Member
    dicentra Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Leftists have one goal, and that is the overthrow of the current system so that they can put themselves in power. Everything they do and say is toward that end.

    They use the phrase “systemic racism” to indict the entire system, thereby justifying its entire destruction. They emphasize injustices, real and hyped up, to justify the destruction of the system. They use the pain of minorities to justify the destruction of the system. 

    The language of “white privilege” draws on the realities of majority/minority dynamics. Every large human society has majorities and minorities. When you’re a minority you have a different experience than the majority. You just do. And people in the majority naturally have a hard time noticing the difficulties the minorities have simply because they lack a point of reference from their own experience.

    When white people publicly acknowledge their “privilege” they’re asserting their status over other white people. “See how pious I am and how awful you are,” is the message. It has exactly jack-all to do with the plight of minorities: it’s a status game white people play with each other.

    The overeducated white people who are in this cult almost all have a romantic notion of revolution. They envision the oppressed rising up against their masters, overthrowing them, and installing system that THEY control.

    Antifa is the muscle; the academics and media types provide narrative cover. God help us all.

    • #3
    • June 5, 2020, at 4:44 PM PDT
    • 2 likes
  4. Leslie Watkins Inactive
    Leslie Watkins Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    This podcast has really helped get me back to almost chill. This is my first experience of Coach Tea, and he is a delight. I’m gay and totally get his observation about what seems to be the overtaking of the left by intersectionality, which is generally promoted and populated by the groups he describes. My guess—and it’s just a guess, no disrespect—is that among regular black guys there’s a grudging appreciation for Trump as a guy’s guy (in the traditional sense) but most aren’t foolish enough to admit it. If that’s true, it suggests that manhood (not Trump-hood!) is becoming a bigger issue among young men, and I see no downside to that.

    Bridget, you get better and better. The online world really benefits from your participation. I think I get your un-ease with believing fully in yourself, i.e., principles and viewpoints. I’m that way too. (You know: how do you know for sure you’re not kidding yourself?) What I do that helps is to recall the scene from the third Raider’s movie when Indy finds himself dangerously close to the edge of the insanely deep chasm that he must get across it and the voice says (paraphrasing): Now is the time to decide what it is you truly believe. It centers me as well as helps me let go of knowing.

    So much appreciation to you both!

     

    • #4
    • June 5, 2020, at 8:03 PM PDT
    • 3 likes
  5. Bryan McAllister Coolidge

    Leslie Watkins (View Comment):
    This podcast has really helped get me back to almost chill

    Leslie, I’m with you on that. This podcast was helpful! But, then I also appreciate your analysis of it, as well. I agree, Bridget’s conversations have been fascinating. I have also really enjoyed visiting her community on phetasy.com. Seems like there are quite a number of good people who are tired of feeling politically homeless. A common thread seems to be civility.

    • #5
    • June 6, 2020, at 11:44 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  6. Bryan McAllister Coolidge

    I’m really glad that I invested the 2 hours to listen to this podcast. In fact, I’ve gone back and started listening a second time. This was my first introduction to Coach Tea. His joie de vivre, and constructive view on life held my interest. He is a man of faith, and this was interwoven across his candid, upbeat, and entertaining thoughts.

    While I don’t see myself getting a tattoo that he’s offering [just kidding – he was not offering this], nor will I be contributing to a prospective GoFund Me [ :-) ], I valued his insight and perspective on the current protests and riots. But, his comments get beyond this unrest. This was a great podcast.

    • #6
    • June 6, 2020, at 11:49 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  7. Hank Rhody, Badgeless Bandito Contributor

    Guilty as charged on the swaggerlessness. 

    • #7
    • June 7, 2020, at 2:42 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  8. Bryan McAllister Coolidge

    Hank Rhody, Badgeless Bandito (View Comment):
    Guilty as charged on the swaggerlessness. 

    I know – me, too! I almost sprayed out my Diet Coke laughing when he said that the first time. It made me think about my degree of swagger … or, lack thereof. 

    • #8
    • June 7, 2020, at 4:58 PM PDT
    • 2 likes
  9. Stad Thatcher

    Great episode!

    • #9
    • June 12, 2020, at 6:42 AM PDT
    • Like
  10. PHCheese Member

    Leslie Watkins (View Comment):

    This podcast has really helped get me back to almost chill. This is my first experience of Coach Tea, and he is a delight. I’m gay and totally get his observation about what seems to be the overtaking of the left by intersectionality, which is generally promoted and populated by the groups he describes. My guess—and it’s just a guess, no disrespect—is that among regular black guys there’s a grudging appreciation for Trump as a guy’s guy (in the traditional sense) but most aren’t foolish enough to admit it. If that’s true, it suggests that manhood (not Trump-hood!) is becoming a bigger issue among young men, and I see no downside to that.

    Bridget, you get better and better. The online world really benefits from your participation. I think I get your un-ease with believing fully in yourself, i.e., principles and viewpoints. I’m that way too. (You know: how do you know for sure you’re not kidding yourself?) What I do that helps is to recall the scene from the third Raider’s movie when Indy finds himself dangerously close to the edge of the insanely deep chasm that he must get across it and the voice says (paraphrasing): Now is the time to decide what it is you truly believe. It centers me as well as helps me let go of knowing.

    So much appreciation to you both!

    Leslie I too appreciate your comment but am a little surprised that you use a movie for inspiration in life. It’s a movie.

     

    • #10
    • June 12, 2020, at 1:11 PM PDT
    • Like