Jim Geraghty of National Review and Rich McFadden of Radio America react to news of yet another terror attack in the UK which targeted British Muslims outside of a London mosque after their evening prayers for Ramadan. They also discuss the Supreme Court’s announcement that they will take up the partisan gerrymandering case in the state of Wisconsin to determine whether or not the act is unconstitutional. And they respond to Erick Erickson’s sensationalist comments as he refers to the left as “America’s ISIS” and advocates for state secession.

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  1. Profile Photo Member

    In an Erick Erickson secession state, Jeb Bush would be president and there would be open borders. So no thank you.

    • #1
    • June 19, 2017, at 9:33 AM PDT
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  2. Curt North Inactive

    It’s looking more and more like Erickson has sort of lost it, I picture him in a rubber room mumbling “Never Trump” over and over, poor guy.

    • #2
    • June 19, 2017, at 11:01 AM PDT
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  3. OccupantCDN Coolidge

    Never heard of Erick Erickson before. His Wikipedia page has this odd line:

    While working at RedState, Erickson developed a reputation as one of the most powerful conservatives in the United States

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erick_Erickson

    Now, I am familiar with RedState and do read it from time to time, but nothing with an EE tagline really ever stuck with me. I guess the point Iam trying to make from his vanity page, is that if you’re reputed to be a powerful conservative shouldnt you actually have some sort of power? Much like a celebrity reputed to be famous – shouldn’t they actually be famous?

    • #3
    • June 19, 2017, at 1:16 PM PDT
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  4. Israel P. Inactive

    Erick Erickson is usually mentioned in the same breath as Hugh Hewitt as people with the same first and last names.

    • #4
    • June 19, 2017, at 1:40 PM PDT
    • 2 likes
  5. OccupantCDN Coolidge

    Israel P. (View Comment):
    Erick Erickson is usually mentioned in the same breath as Hugh Hewitt as people with the same first and last names.

    Yes, and Chris Christie, Charles Carmichael (ok fictional).

    To the other issues in the podcast, I think gerrymandering should not be allowed, but I dont see how its unconstitutional. The entire Congressional Black Conference only exists in gerrymandered districts. IF safe districts where moderates cannot be heard, and those who would compromise to get something done, would get primaried over any compromise. I think it would moderate the tone of dialogue in the national debate, and would go along way to actually getting government to function properly – constitutionally for the first time in maybe 20 years.

    Notice how anything that democrats suddenly dont like is unconstitutional? Even if they’d been doing it for decades.

    • #5
    • June 19, 2017, at 3:30 PM PDT
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  6. dicentra Member
    dicentra Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    “If he were to sit there and talk to you mano y mano…”

    “Hand and hand”?

    It’s “mano a mano” (hand to hand), and it describes combat, not discussion.

    Maybe it’s “tête à tête” you were looking for.

    • #6
    • June 19, 2017, at 6:24 PM PDT
    • 1 like
  7. OccupantCDN Coolidge

    dicentra (View Comment):
    “If he were to sit there and talk to you mano y mano…”

    “Hand and hand”?

    It’s “mano a mano” (hand to hand), and it describes combat, not discussion.

    Maybe it’s “tête à tête” you were looking for.

    But Tete a Tete sounds dirty.

    • #7
    • June 19, 2017, at 7:44 PM PDT
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  8. Icarus213 Thatcher

    My only defense of gerrymandering is that districts that are drawn up by to be fair and even typically end up being VERY expensive to run in. Colorado’s 7th district and Washington’s 8th district are great examples: because they are supposed to be swing districts, they attract a lot of money, and whoever is defending them has to spend a lot of time and energy fundraising.

    • #8
    • June 20, 2017, at 11:49 AM PDT
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