Join Jim and Greg as they welcome news of a pretty big shift in political party allegiance over the past year. They also unload on the tech executive and partial owner of the NBA’s Golden State Warriors who coldly declared that he and most people do not care about the plight of the Uighurs in China. And they’re frustrated to learn that the gunman at the Texas synagogue hostage crisis was allowed into the U.S. despite numerous red flags.

 

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Bambee

There are 3 comments.

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  1. GlennAmurgis Coolidge
    GlennAmurgis
    @GlennAmurgis

    I am wondering if  Palihapitiya is repeating the NBA ownership views out loud

    • #1
  2. Leslie Watkins Member
    Leslie Watkins
    @LeslieWatkins

    This NBA owner’s coarse but truthful comments are no worse than the fact that most who claim to care about the plight of the Uighurs embody virtually no indication of that belief save for their discourse. And truth be told, this guy’s concerns are genuinely important as well. Of course, his insincere backtracking and equalizing reveal him to be a good deal worse than simply off the beaten path to civility. But his general point pertains. Americans don’t care about the Uighurs in any meaningful sense because there is no good way to do so. And though Americans love their country, we recognize our cultural sins and thus allow for this kind of criticism—up to a point. Not trying to say his view is “good” or “bad,” only that it’s probably the dominant American opinion, if we’re being honest, however much Americans actually do like to help.

    • #2
  3. Taras Coolidge
    Taras
    @Taras

    Leslie Watkins (View Comment):

    This NBA owner’s coarse but truthful comments are no worse than the fact that most who claim to care about the plight of the Uighurs embody virtually no indication of that belief save for their discourse. And truth be told, this guy’s concerns are genuinely important as well. Of course, his insincere backtracking and equalizing reveal him to be a good deal worse than simply off the beaten path to civility. But his general point pertains. Americans don’t care about the Uighurs in any meaningful sense because there is no good way to do so. And though Americans love their country, we recognize our cultural sins and thus allow for this kind of criticism—up to a point. Not trying to say his view is “good” or “bad,” only that it’s probably the dominant American opinion, if we’re being honest, however much Americans actually do like to help.

    Doing your best to avoid buying Chinese goods is a start.  Not to mention voting for  politicians who act as if they are on the Chicom payroll (usually Democrats).

    • #3
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