Jim is on vacation but there’s still plenty of fireworks on Thursday’s Three Martini Lunch. Greg is joined by Chad Benson, host of “The Chad Benson Show.” Today, they get a kick out Bill Gates wondering just how much of his money Elizabeth Warren wants and concluding a conversation with Warren might not be worth his time because he’s not sure how open-minded she is. They also recoil as a judge allows police to demand DNA from one of those outfits that tracks your heritage as part of an investigation, although Chad reminds us we all have pretty much voluntarily given up our privacy. And they fire back at 11,000 “scientists” who now say the Green New Deal is not enough, but we have to engage in population control too.

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There are 6 comments.

  1. Arahant Member

    Ricochet Audio Network: They also recoil as a judge allows police to demand DNA from one of those outfits that tracks your heritage as part of an investigation, although Chad reminds us we all have pretty much voluntarily given up our privacy.

    How different is this than a subpoena to request your phone records? If the information is out there, why should there not be access to it through due process?

    • #1
    • November 7, 2019, at 12:02 PM PST
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  2. kedavis Member

    Ricochet Audio Network: Today, they get a kick out Bill Gates wondering just how much of his money Elizabeth Warren wants and concluding a conversation with Warren might not be worth his time because he’s not sure how open-minded she is.

    Elizabeth Warren could easily be one of those people who are so open-minded, their brain has fallen out.

    • #2
    • November 7, 2019, at 3:38 PM PST
    • 1 like
  3. kedavis Member

    Arahant (View Comment):

    Ricochet Audio Network: They also recoil as a judge allows police to demand DNA from one of those outfits that tracks your heritage as part of an investigation, although Chad reminds us we all have pretty much voluntarily given up our privacy.

    How different is this than a subpoena to request your phone records? If the information is out there, why should there not be access to it through due process?

    As Jim and Greg pointed out the other day about “revenge porn” etc, if you want to make sure that stuff doesn’t get distributed, don’t create it. That said, it sounded like what they were saying today was the police/whoever were basically “going fishing.” That is, scanning an entire database looking for someone. Search warrants don’t allow that either, it would be like trying to get a warrant for a whole apartment building or neighborhood or whatever, to see if you can find a weapon somewhere. It would be a different story if they had Probable Cause to match a DNA sample from a crime scene with the DNA profile of ONE SPECIFIC PERSON at 23 And Me or whatever. That is how search warrants work.

    • #3
    • November 7, 2019, at 6:07 PM PST
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  4. Arahant Member

    kedavis (View Comment):
    It would be a different story if they had Probable Cause to match a DNA sample from a crime scene with the DNA profile of ONE SPECIFIC PERSON at 23 And Me or whatever.

    Maybe they do. They have in the past uploaded a criminal’s profile data to see what relatives came up.

    • #4
    • November 7, 2019, at 6:24 PM PST
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  5. Arahant Member

    kedavis (View Comment):
    As Jim and Greg pointed out the other day about “revenge porn” etc, if you want to make sure that stuff doesn’t get distributed, don’t create it.

    Also, no kidding. It’s why I’m not in any of these databases. Cod knows what happens when they deep fake genetic material for crimes.

    • #5
    • November 7, 2019, at 6:26 PM PST
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  6. kedavis Member

    Arahant (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):
    It would be a different story if they had Probable Cause to match a DNA sample from a crime scene with the DNA profile of ONE SPECIFIC PERSON at 23 And Me or whatever.

    Maybe they do. They have in the past uploaded a criminal’s profile data to see what relatives came up.

    But that’s another “fishing expedition.” What I mean could valid, with a search warrant, is, “we have this DNA from a crime scene. Check to see if it matches your DNA profile for John Q Public. And ONLY John Q Public..”

    The thing is, that’s not really what the police etc want. Because if they have a warrant they might be able to compel a DNA sample from John Q Public anyway. Or they might have had to register DNA already if they were convicted of something previously. The only real reason for going to something like 23 And Me is to do a “fishing expedition” which is what the 4th Amendment doesn’t allow.

    • #6
    • November 7, 2019, at 7:08 PM PST
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