Join Jim and Greg as they cheer the recovery of British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and his heartfelt thanks to those who saved his life. They also slam Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer for implementing insane restrictions like not being able to visit someone else’s home and not being able to buy plants, flowers, seeds, or even child car seats. And they unload on the New York Times for dismissing a woman’s sexual assault claim against Joe Biden by saying it could not find any other pattern of abuse except for the women who already accused him of hugs, kisses, and touching that made them uncomfortable.

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  1. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    I have seen the yellow tape. It did not say, “Police line. Do not cross,” but it worked out the same. It’s just great being in Michigan.

    • #1
  2. Taras Coolidge
    Taras
    @Taras

    Remember, Jim Geraghty is always — well, you know.

    He describes the Michigan policy of blocking off parts of stores, so people can’t buy “unessential” items, as insane; but he can’t explain exactly why it’s insane.

    Blocking off parts of stores reduces the paths store patrons can take to avoid getting close to each other, which forces them into greater proximity.  

    For example, when I visit my local superstore, I usually have to travel from the pharmacy on one side of the store, to the groceries on the other side of the store, and then to the self checkout.  To avoid other shoppers, I may chart a path through furniture or small appliances or ladies underwear.

    This Michigan policy is not just useless, but actually increases the risk.

     

    • #2
  3. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    Taras (View Comment):
    This Michigan policy is not just useless, but actually increases the risk.

    Of course, it came from a Democrat.

    • #3
  4. OccupantCDN Coolidge
    OccupantCDN
    @OccupantCDN

    Arahant (View Comment):

    I have seen the yellow tape. It did not say, “Police line. Do not cross,” but it worked out the same. It’s just great being in Michigan.

    Isnt that how they mark Detroit city limits?

    • #4
  5. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):
    Isnt that how they mark Detroit city limits?

    Not yet, but it’s not a bad idea.

    • #5
  6. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Taras (View Comment):

    Remember, Jim Geraghty is always — well, you know.

    He describes the Michigan policy of blocking off parts of stores, so people can’t buy “unessential” items, as insane; but he can’t explain exactly why it’s insane.

    Blocking off parts of stores reduces the paths store patrons can take to avoid getting close to each other, which forces them into greater proximity.

    For example, when I visit my local superstore, I usually have to travel from the pharmacy on one side of the store, to the groceries on the other side of the store, and then to the self checkout. To avoid other shoppers, I may chart a path through furniture or small appliances or ladies underwear.

    This Michigan policy is not just useless, but actually increases the risk.

    On the other hand, if you keep people out of “non-essential” areas, store workers don’t have to keep cleaning/disinfecting them over and over.  Including all the packets of seeds they might touch, etc.

    So I can see it going either way.  Maybe some stores could have an exemption.

    • #6