Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America cover Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s disastrous questioning of acting ICE Director Thomas Homan. They discuss President Trump’s controversial Twitter rants against progressive Democratic congresswomen. And they get a kick out of a social media campaign among UFO enthusiasts to storm Area 51.

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There are 9 comments.

  1. Arahant Member

    “Having a little trouble, Nancy? Don’t worry. I’ve got you covered, but you’re gonna owe me bigly. This is a Yuuge favor I’m gonna do you. Now, hold my Diet Coke.”

    • #1
    • July 15, 2019, at 1:28 PM PDT
    • Like
  2. Lazy_Millennial Member

    Some awkward kids in middle and high school “Naruto run” between classes. Below is an example of how it looks on the anime vs how it looks in real life:

    • #2
    • July 15, 2019, at 2:23 PM PDT
    • 1 like
  3. Taras Coolidge

     As a child of immigrants, indeed refugees, let me present Dirty Immigration Secret #1: To the end of their days, immigrants’ primary loyalty is to their home country. 

    Dirty Immigration Secret #2: In earlier times, we could count on the media and the public schools to inculcate patriotism into the children of immigrants. However, this is at best only partially true today. 

    Thus, we can reasonably conclude that Trump was probably right to identify all four of these left-wing Congresspersons as among those whose primary loyalty is to something other than America, even if technically only one is a first generation immigrant.

    That loyalty may be to a racial or ethnic group, or even to a foreign country.

    Here’s a similar example from history. According to historians who specialize in the matter, it would be technically incorrect to name Robert Oppenheimer as an agent of the Soviet Union, even if (as they believe) he was a secret member of the Communist Party. But only technically, because his efforts to postpone and prevent the development of an American H-bomb, even as Stalin was racing to complete his own, were indistinguishable from what a Soviet agent of influence would have done. 

     

     

    • #3
    • July 15, 2019, at 5:24 PM PDT
    • 1 like
  4. lowtech redneck Coolidge

    Taras (View Comment):

    As a child of immigrants, indeed refugees, let me present Dirty Immigration Secret #1: To the end of their days, immigrants’ primary loyalty is to their home country.

    Dirty Immigration Secret #2: In earlier times, we could count on the media and the public schools to inculcate patriotism into the children of immigrants. However, this is at best only partially true today.

    I don’t entirely agree with the first part (though its probably true more often than not, nowadays), but I wholeheartedly agree with the second. I would in fact go further, and say that public schools deliberately inculcate the exact opposite, and the children of immigrants, lacking the benefit of familial socialization from people who grew up with traditional American patriotism, are the most susceptible (as well as to anti-American pop-culture).

    • #4
    • July 15, 2019, at 8:13 PM PDT
    • 3 likes
  5. Joseph Stocks Member

    Yeah, the part that Jim and Greg are missing is that Trump is hitting on a question a lot Americans of a liberal bent have a hard time answering; do you have a baseline gratitude for being an American? I think when it comes to Omar, she clearly has loyalties other than this country. For example, I have never heard her say anything critical of Islam (we can compare that to Catholics on this site who correctly and passionately point out the decay in the Catholic Church) yet she has a baseline assumption that America is a racist, immoral country. Which highlights Trump’s jab at her; can Rep. Illhan Omar name a political belief or concept that originated in Somalia that is superior to the political beliefs and concepts that founded this country? The answer is clearly she cannot. 

    • #5
    • July 16, 2019, at 6:59 AM PDT
    • 1 like
  6. Joseph Stocks Member

    @taras and @lowtech-redneck,Both of you hit on something that I’ve been passionate about the past three years. I just served a 3 year contract in the Army. For most of that time I embarked on an informal poll about what these young (I’m considerably older than the new soldiers coming in) soldiers believed about America and what they were taught about America in their public schools. The first most astonishing thing I discovered was that most of the soldiers I talked to would not call America a ‘good’ country. I believe this is the product of 12 or so years of teaching relativism to these kids; nothing is good or bad, right or wrong. The next question I would ask them was; what were you taught about American history? The vast majority brought up two events; slavery and our treatment of Native Americans. For a lot of these young soldiers these are the foundational events in the founding of our country. It’s not surprising that for a lot of these young soldiers, the concept of patriotism or gratitude for being an American wasn’t high on their list. And I want to repeat, these were soldiers in the US Army. Of all people you’d expect to have some form of love of country it is soldiers but that tragically wasn’t my experience. 

    • #6
    • July 16, 2019, at 7:10 AM PDT
    • 3 likes
  7. Taras Coolidge

    Joseph Stocks (View Comment):@taras and @lowtech-redneck,Both of you hit on something that I’ve been passionate about the past three years. I just served a 3 year contract in the Army. For most of that time I embarked on an informal poll about what these young (I’m considerably older than the new soldiers coming in) soldiers believed about America and what they were taught about America in their public schools. The first most astonishing thing I discovered was that most of the soldiers I talked to would not call America a ‘good’ country. I believe this is the product of 12 or so years of teaching relativism to these kids; nothing is good or bad, right or wrong. The next question I would ask them was; what were you taught about American history? The vast majority brought up two events; slavery and our treatment of Native Americans. For a lot of these young soldiers these are the foundational events in the founding of our country. It’s not surprising that for a lot of these young soldiers, the concept of patriotism or gratitude for being an American wasn’t high on their list. And I want to repeat, these were soldiers in the US Army. Of all people you’d expect to have some form of love of country it is soldiers but that tragically wasn’t my experience.

    When I daydream about what would be happening if the conservative movement really existed, one of the ideas is that we track and measure patriotism.

    For example, I suspect that kids who go to parochial schools are more patriotic than kids who go to public school. We could measure the decline in patriotism among children who switch from parochial to public schools. And look at which textbooks teach patriotism and which ones try to break it down.

    This would be a devastating argument against the public school monopoly; if, that is, the conservative movement really existed.

    • #7
    • July 16, 2019, at 9:56 AM PDT
    • 1 like
  8. Patrick McClure Member

    It will be interesting to hear 3ML today after the squad presser.

    • #8
    • July 16, 2019, at 11:47 AM PDT
    • 1 like
  9. kedavis Member

    Joseph Stocks (View Comment):

    @taras and @lowtech-redneck,Both of you hit on something that I’ve been passionate about the past three years. I just served a 3 year contract in the Army. For most of that time I embarked on an informal poll about what these young (I’m considerably older than the new soldiers coming in) soldiers believed about America and what they were taught about America in their public schools. The first most astonishing thing I discovered was that most of the soldiers I talked to would not call America a ‘good’ country. I believe this is the product of 12 or so years of teaching relativism to these kids; nothing is good or bad, right or wrong. The next question I would ask them was; what were you taught about American history? The vast majority brought up two events; slavery and our treatment of Native Americans. For a lot of these young soldiers these are the foundational events in the founding of our country. It’s not surprising that for a lot of these young soldiers, the concept of patriotism or gratitude for being an American wasn’t high on their list. And I want to repeat, these were soldiers in the US Army. Of all people you’d expect to have some form of love of country it is soldiers but that tragically wasn’t my experience.

    Sad but true. The younger no-longer-serving military people I’ve encountered only wanted a paycheck.

    • #9
    • July 18, 2019, at 11:43 AM PDT
    • 1 like