Join Jim and Greg as they update the “incident” at the Natanz nuclear site and enjoy learning how it was much more devastating than first reported. Then they feel very weird agreeing with former Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid but believe he right to warn the Democrats against court packing. They discuss the significance of the FDA and CDC calling for a pause in administering the Johnson & Johnson COVID vaccine. And they discuss the inexplicable error of a Minnesota police officer in a recent shooting death there but also hammer Michigan Rep. Rashida Tlaib for suggesting this case is further proof that we need to abolish police and incarceration.

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Theragun Gen 4

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  1. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    Might want to look into stress-induced errors in decision-making. Yes, they should be better trained. And, yes, there does seem to be quite the cluster in heavily Democrat-Farmer-Labor-run Minnesota. Could there be a correlation there? A good reporter would want to find out.

    • #1
  2. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Arahant (View Comment):

    Might want to look into stress-induced errors in decision-making. Yes, they should be better trained. And, yes, there does seem to be quite the cluster in heavily Democrat-Farmer-Labor-run Minnesota. Could there be a correlation there? A good reporter would want to find out.

    They wouldn’t dare try to find out, if they want to still be a “reporter.”

    • #2
  3. OccupantCDN Coolidge
    OccupantCDN
    @OccupantCDN

    Even if the officer grabbed the taser, wouldn’t it also have likely caused great injury or even death?

    50 000 volts passing through the same area that the bullet did could also have caused significant damage in their own right…

    • #3
  4. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):

    Even if the officer grabbed the taser, wouldn’t it also have likely caused great injury or even death?

    50 000 volts passing through the same area that the bullet did could also have caused significant damage in their own right…

    It would have caused plenty of pain, but would have been much less likely to cause injury or death. Electricity from a TASER tends to travel over, not through the skin.

    • #4
  5. OccupantCDN Coolidge
    OccupantCDN
    @OccupantCDN

    Arahant (View Comment):

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):

    Even if the officer grabbed the taser, wouldn’t it also have likely caused great injury or even death?

    50 000 volts passing through the same area that the bullet did could also have caused significant damage in their own right…

    It would have caused plenty of pain, but would have been much less likely to cause injury or death. Electricity from a TASER tends to travel over, not through the skin.

    Tasers still killed over 1000 people in the US alone. (not sure of the time period of these deaths – google found an old Reuter’s article about taser deaths. The point I kind of glossed over, is even if the officer grabbed the right weapon, the outcome may have been the same.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-axon-taser-toll-idUSKCN1B21AH

    One thing – the judge in the Chauvin case did not sequester the Jury – the maybe grounds for appeal should the jury convict.

    • #5
  6. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):

    Arahant (View Comment):

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):

    Even if the officer grabbed the taser, wouldn’t it also have likely caused great injury or even death?

    50 000 volts passing through the same area that the bullet did could also have caused significant damage in their own right…

    It would have caused plenty of pain, but would have been much less likely to cause injury or death. Electricity from a TASER tends to travel over, not through the skin.

    Tasers still killed over 1000 people in the US alone. (not sure of the time period of these deaths – google found an old Reuter’s article about taser deaths. The point I kind of glossed over, is even if the officer grabbed the right weapon, the outcome may have been the same.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-axon-taser-toll-idUSKCN1B21AH

    One thing – the judge in the Chauvin case did not sequester the Jury – the maybe grounds for appeal should the jury convict.

    One of perhaps many.  But you gotta wonder sometimes if maybe judges do something like that on purpose.

    • #6
  7. OccupantCDN Coolidge
    OccupantCDN
    @OccupantCDN

    kedavis (View Comment):

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):

    Arahant (View Comment):

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):

    Even if the officer grabbed the taser, wouldn’t it also have likely caused great injury or even death?

    50 000 volts passing through the same area that the bullet did could also have caused significant damage in their own right…

    It would have caused plenty of pain, but would have been much less likely to cause injury or death. Electricity from a TASER tends to travel over, not through the skin.

    Tasers still killed over 1000 people in the US alone. (not sure of the time period of these deaths – google found an old Reuter’s article about taser deaths. The point I kind of glossed over, is even if the officer grabbed the right weapon, the outcome may have been the same.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-axon-taser-toll-idUSKCN1B21AH

    One thing – the judge in the Chauvin case did not sequester the Jury – the maybe grounds for appeal should the jury convict.

    One of perhaps many. But you gotta wonder sometimes if maybe judges do something like that on purpose.

    Oh, I am sure it was. They dont care anymore.

    So the state witnesses – expert medical examiner called the manner of death “Undetermined” – how can anyone be charged with homicide if the manner of death is undetermined? There was no bruising on George Floyd’s neck or back – indicating that there was minimal force applied to hold him down.

    The defense moved for the charges to be dismissed, as the state had not proved its case.

    • #7
  8. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):

    Arahant (View Comment):

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):

    Even if the officer grabbed the taser, wouldn’t it also have likely caused great injury or even death?

    50 000 volts passing through the same area that the bullet did could also have caused significant damage in their own right…

    It would have caused plenty of pain, but would have been much less likely to cause injury or death. Electricity from a TASER tends to travel over, not through the skin.

    Tasers still killed over 1000 people in the US alone. (not sure of the time period of these deaths – google found an old Reuter’s article about taser deaths. The point I kind of glossed over, is even if the officer grabbed the right weapon, the outcome may have been the same.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-axon-taser-toll-idUSKCN1B21AH

    One thing – the judge in the Chauvin case did not sequester the Jury – the maybe grounds for appeal should the jury convict.

    One of perhaps many. But you gotta wonder sometimes if maybe judges do something like that on purpose.

    Oh, I am sure it was. They dont care anymore.

    So the state witnesses – expert medical examiner called the manner of death “Undetermined” – how can anyone be charged with homicide if the manner of death is undetermined? There was no bruising on George Floyd’s neck or back – indicating that there was minimal force applied to hold him down.

    The defense moved for the charges to be dismissed, as the state had not proved its case.

    Well, my point was that by introducing a grounds for appeal should the jury – due to fear from the mob – convict when they shouldn’t, the easy and obvious appeal allows a judge at the next step up, to overturn the case.  If the jury HAD BEEN sequestered, and convicted improperly for the same reason (they didn’t need to know about this latest incident in order to  have a reasonable certainty of what would happen if they acquitted) it wouldn’t be as easy to overturn on appeal.

    • #8
  9. Taras Coolidge
    Taras
    @Taras

    kedavis (View Comment):

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):

    Arahant (View Comment):

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):

    Even if the officer grabbed the taser, wouldn’t it also have likely caused great injury or even death?

    50 000 volts passing through the same area that the bullet did could also have caused significant damage in their own right…

    It would have caused plenty of pain, but would have been much less likely to cause injury or death. Electricity from a TASER tends to travel over, not through the skin.

    Tasers still killed over 1000 people in the US alone. (not sure of the time period of these deaths – google found an old Reuter’s article about taser deaths. The point I kind of glossed over, is even if the officer grabbed the right weapon, the outcome may have been the same.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-axon-taser-toll-idUSKCN1B21AH

    One thing – the judge in the Chauvin case did not sequester the Jury – the maybe grounds for appeal should the jury convict.

    One of perhaps many. But you gotta wonder sometimes if maybe judges do something like that on purpose.

    Oh, I am sure it was. They dont care anymore.

    So the state witnesses – expert medical examiner called the manner of death “Undetermined” – how can anyone be charged with homicide if the manner of death is undetermined? There was no bruising on George Floyd’s neck or back – indicating that there was minimal force applied to hold him down.

    The defense moved for the charges to be dismissed, as the state had not proved its case.

    Well, my point was that by introducing a grounds for appeal should the jury – due to fear from the mob – convict when they shouldn’t, the easy and obvious appeal allows a judge at the next step up, to overturn the case. If the jury HAD BEEN sequestered, and convicted improperly for the same reason (they didn’t need to know about this latest incident in order to have a reasonable certainty of what would happen if they acquitted) it wouldn’t be as easy to overturn on appeal.

    In the second trial in the Rodney King case, change of venue was not granted.  The judge wanted to be sure the jury’s “mistake” in the first trial was not repeated.

    Similarly, the judge in the Derek Chauvin case refused change of venue, as well as refusing to sequester.  A fair trial in this case required both, Alan Dershowitz has said.  So we can be pretty sure the fix is in.

    • #9
  10. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Taras (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):

    Arahant (View Comment):

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):

    Even if the officer grabbed the taser, wouldn’t it also have likely caused great injury or even death?

    50 000 volts passing through the same area that the bullet did could also have caused significant damage in their own right…

    It would have caused plenty of pain, but would have been much less likely to cause injury or death. Electricity from a TASER tends to travel over, not through the skin.

    Tasers still killed over 1000 people in the US alone. (not sure of the time period of these deaths – google found an old Reuter’s article about taser deaths. The point I kind of glossed over, is even if the officer grabbed the right weapon, the outcome may have been the same.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-axon-taser-toll-idUSKCN1B21AH

    One thing – the judge in the Chauvin case did not sequester the Jury – the maybe grounds for appeal should the jury convict.

    One of perhaps many. But you gotta wonder sometimes if maybe judges do something like that on purpose.

    Oh, I am sure it was. They dont care anymore.

    So the state witnesses – expert medical examiner called the manner of death “Undetermined” – how can anyone be charged with homicide if the manner of death is undetermined? There was no bruising on George Floyd’s neck or back – indicating that there was minimal force applied to hold him down.

    The defense moved for the charges to be dismissed, as the state had not proved its case.

    Well, my point was that by introducing a grounds for appeal should the jury – due to fear from the mob – convict when they shouldn’t, the easy and obvious appeal allows a judge at the next step up, to overturn the case. If the jury HAD BEEN sequestered, and convicted improperly for the same reason (they didn’t need to know about this latest incident in order to have a reasonable certainty of what would happen if they acquitted) it wouldn’t be as easy to overturn on appeal.

    In the second trial in the Rodney King case, change of venue was not granted. The judge wanted to be sure the jury’s “mistake” in the first trial was not repeated.

    Similarly, the judge in the Derek Chauvin case refused change of venue, as well as refusing to sequester. A fair trial in this case required both, Alan Dershowitz has said. So we can be pretty sure the fix is in.

    But is the “fix” only to assure conviction, or might it also be to assure overturn on appeal?

    • #10