What’s so bad about Common Core? Joy Pullmann explains in her new book, The Education Invasion: How Common Core Fights Parents for Control of American Kids.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Pullmann explains why “accountability” and “standards” are so often meaningless buzzwords, how parents can tell if a school is good, and what the Trump administration should do to improve schooling.

Subscribe to The Bookmonger with John J. Miller in iTunes (and leave a 5-star review, please!), or by RSS feed. For all our podcasts in one place, subscribe to the Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed in iTunes or by RSS feed.

Please Support Our Sponsor!

Podcast listeners: Now become a Ricochet member for only $2.50 a month! Join and see what you’ve been missing.

Members have made 7 comments.

  1. Profile photo of Arahant Member

    It sounds as if she knows what she is talking about, but bless her heart, she is difficult to listen to, y’know?

    • #1
    • February 6, 2017 at 6:06 pm
    • LikeLike
  2. Profile photo of CB Toder aka Mama Toad Member

    Seriously, too much tinny feedback!

    • #2
    • February 7, 2017 at 12:36 am
    • LikeLike
  3. Profile photo of JoyPullmann Inactive

    You’re right @Aharant. I knew I was having a hard time with this one while I was doing it, and that was frustrating me. Maybe it was that I was coming off another interview on a completely different topic and had missed lunch. Also, John was asking some great questions I don’t get often so don’t have efficient answers to.

    To make up for it, I decided to pop on here and offer to answer any questions you have or discuss any points you thought I wasn’t clear on.

    • #3
    • February 7, 2017 at 4:05 am
    • LikeLike
  4. Profile photo of Arahant Member

    JoyPullmann (View Comment):
    To make up for it, I decided to pop on here and offer to answer any questions you have or discuss any points you thought I wasn’t clear on.

    You seemed clear enough to me. It was the verbal tics that made listening difficult. Thankfully, those will not appear in your writing. Was there anything that you thought you could have explained better?

    • #4
    • February 7, 2017 at 4:10 am
    • LikeLike
  5. Profile photo of John Miller Contributor

    @joypullmann: I’ve already asked you a bunch of questions, but here’s a timely one: What do you think of Betsy DeVos as education secretary? The vote is coming up!

    • #5
    • February 7, 2017 at 7:24 am
    • LikeLike
  6. Profile photo of Terry Riley Member

    @joypullmann: You mentioned you and your husband might be starting a classical school. In which state will that be located? My son is a junior at Hillsdale College and we are from the Columbus, Ohio area. I have often wondered why there are no Hillsdale classical schools in Ohio.

    • #6
    • February 7, 2017 at 10:20 am
    • LikeLike
  7. Profile photo of JoyPullmann Inactive

    Terry Riley (View Comment):
    @joypullmann: You mentioned you and your husband might be starting a classical school. In which state will that be located? My son is a junior at Hillsdale College and we are from the Columbus, Ohio area. I have often wondered why there are no Hillsdale classical schools in Ohio.

    Indiana. You can message me for more info. As for the Ohio question, Terry, I am going to venture to guess that it has to do with Ohio’s crappy charter school laws. The biggest prohibitive laws and regulations for opening good schools — and there are many — are teacher certification mandates. If I’m trying to run a school that is very distinct in many key ways from the traditional public schools, the last thing I want are my teachers forced to adopt the philosophy and teaching practices of those schools I’m trying to distinguish our school from!

    I just wrote this, which answers @johnmiller‘s question and explains this same concept about the teacher certification mandates.

    @arahant, I wanted to have a better answer specifically for the “accountability” question. I believe choice is accountability. When a parent control’s his child’s public education funds, he is holding whatever school he chooses accountable. That’s natural, market accountability. Statists use that word instead to basically mean “we don’t like your choices so we’ll eliminate them.” It’s a buzzword, and an evil one, with a lot of false assumptions baked in.

    • #7
    • February 9, 2017 at 10:17 am
    • LikeLike