On this, the final episode of The Classicist Podcast, Victor Davis Hansons answers listener questions on everything from farming to war movies to which books he’s always wanted to write but never gotten around to. Tune in for a jam-packed episode featuring VDH like you’ve never heard him before.

It has been an honor to carry this show since its inception 6 years ago, and we are sorry to see it go, but excited for Victor to explore news ways to get his thoughts out to a new audience. Victor will still make appearances on our other shows and we may even start a new show with him in the future. Until then, we wish him much success in his new venture.

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There are 21 comments.

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  1. Nick Plosser Coolidge
    Nick Plosser
    @NickP

    Have been learning from Prof Hanson for 20 years now and am a regular listener to The Classicist. Sorry to see this podcast end. Thanks  to Troy and best of luck to Prof. Hanson! 

    • #1
  2. davenr321 Coolidge
    davenr321
    @davenr321

    Sorry to see this podcast go! I will cherish this episode always!

    • #2
  3. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    If he switches to a paid podcast behind a pay wall, he is still going to get a million subscribers.

    • #3
  4. GlennAmurgis Coolidge
    GlennAmurgis
    @GlennAmurgis

    Will miss VDH’s podcast – this and the one on NR was always a weekly listen 

    I

     

    • #4
  5. Gazpacho Grande' Coolidge
    Gazpacho Grande'
    @ChrisCampion

    DUDE!  Last podcast?  I look forward to the next iteration.

    Also, I blame Troy.

    • #5
  6. Blondie Thatcher
    Blondie
    @Blondie

    Hoping we can get the new podcast. VDH is always a great listen. 

    • #6
  7. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    Gazpacho Grande' (View Comment):

    DUDE! Last podcast? I look forward to the next iteration.

    Also, I blame Troy.

    • #7
  8. Troy Senik Contributor
    Troy Senik
    @TroySenik

    Gazpacho Grande' (View Comment):

    DUDE! Last podcast? I look forward to the next iteration.

    Also, I blame Troy.

    Never a bad instinct.

    • #8
  9. Taras Coolidge
    Taras
    @Taras

    I found Prof. Hanson’s new podcast, “The Traditionalist”, here:

    https://vdhanson.podbean.com/

    I see he already has three episodes in the can, so I have a bit of catching up to do!

    • #9
  10. Bryan G. Stephens Thatcher
    Bryan G. Stephens
    @BryanGStephens

    One of the few podcasts I still listen too. 

    Troy, don’t lose the others! 

    • #10
  11. Samuel Block Support
    Samuel Block
    @SamuelBlock

    Aw, man. It’s not that I think I’ve done anything to deserve a Classicist podcast, but I’ve become used to having one. If only it could go on forever! 

    • #11
  12. Boney Cole Member
    Boney Cole
    @BoneyCole

    Great podcast, I will miss it.  I have heard Mr. Hanson mention the story of the US raisin industry a time or two before.  I am sure I would find a book about the details of the story fascinating. It would likely become a classic in the economics of government and private agriculture interaction.  Your fans are impatiently waiting!

    • #12
  13. Blue Yeti Admin
    Blue Yeti
    @BlueYeti

    Bryan G. Stephens (View Comment):
    One of the few podcasts I still listen too.

    Troy, don’t lose the others!

    I explained all of the changes in more detail here, but in short, Troy is also leaving the Libertarian podcast but will remain the host of Law Talk with Epstein & Yoo (because Richard and John threatened to sue him if he didn’t).  The Libertarian will continue on with a new host that we will announce next week.

    • #13
  14. Nick Plosser Coolidge
    Nick Plosser
    @NickP

    Blue Yeti (View Comment):

    Bryan G. Stephens (View Comment):

    One of the few podcasts I still listen too.

    Troy, don’t lose the others!

    Troy is also leaving the Libertarian podcast but will remain the host of Law Talk with Epstein & Yoo (because Richard and John threatened to sue him if he didn’t). The Libertarian will continue on with a new host that we will announce next week.

    This is excellent news for the peace and tranquility of the Law Talk Lounge. Troy is the Mills Lane of Law Talk! 

    • #14
  15. Architectus Coolidge
    Architectus
    @Architectus

    For now, I am going to live in denial that this is actually the last episode of this podcast.  Hopefully this issue will be rectified before I exit my denial phase.  Thank you, that is all. 

    • #15
  16. Blondie Thatcher
    Blondie
    @Blondie

    Blue Yeti (View Comment):

    Bryan G. Stephens (View Comment):
    One of the few podcasts I still listen too.

    Troy, don’t lose the others!

    I explained all of the changes in more detail here, but in short, Troy is also leaving the Libertarian podcast but will remain the host of Law Talk with Epstein & Yoo (because Richard and John threatened to sue him if he didn’t). The Libertarian will continue on with a new host that we will announce next week.

    Admit it, @blueyeti, you couldn’t bribe anybody else to do that podcast. Y’all have blackmail on Troy. ;)

    Seriously, I’m glad to hear this. The 3 of them have a great chemistry.

    • #16
  17. David Pettus Coolidge
    David Pettus
    @DavidPettus

    Perhaps my favorite podcast.  Sorry to see it go.

    • #17
  18. Michael Cahill Lincoln
    Michael Cahill
    @Mbwcahill

    VDH and Troy:

    Please keep us all informed of the next iteration. 

    I will miss these important conversations.

    • #18
  19. Wolfsheim Member
    Wolfsheim
    @Wolfsheim

    Very sorry to see this podcast end! It is, however, a great comfort to know that we can go on listening elsewhere. (Troy Senik has done a superb job, I hope to hear more from him.)

    I once lived not far from where VDH’s farm is located. I knew and admired farmers, without having the slightest knowledge of or talent for their most noble calling. I also knew the Bay Area and its academic scene–and wound up as a professor, even though I would never want to live in the People’s Republic of Berserkley.

    There is so much about this final episode that inclines me to think it is the best one I’ve heard–and the competition is fierce…

    I am bit older than VDH and remember, when I lived in America, the wild Sixties. There was the old “hard left,” of which I was in my foolish youth a part. But it was (rightly) most unpopular–and we knew it. VDH is absolutely right in seeing the (relatively) popular left that emerged in those days as unserious, though it did, as VDH points out, its own very serious damage.

    A good part of the perverse “fun” of being a leftist in the old days was spouting pretentious nonsense that one knew perfectly well was despised by those outside the (dubious) oasis of upper-middle-class academia. I had already become a conservative by the time I realized that all that talk was genuine intellectual poison.

    In early middle age I spent two years in a private liberal arts university in America and saw just how far the venom had spread.

    I often tell the story of asking students to tell me when America entered the war against Japan and Germany and when the war ended. The closest answer was 1920-194o…My purpose had been positive; I had assumed that American students knew such things and was intending to remind them of their inherent sense of national awareness. Their reaction was hostile: They said I was engaging in a nasty trivia contest. Relating my experience to my then-colleagues, I found myself in worse trouble: Pointing out just how ignorant the kids were was clearly verboten. And then there was the view that the “dumber” the students were, the easier it would be to turn them into warriors against “capitalism,” “imperialism,” “racism,” and “homophobia.”

    It’s surely even worse now…

    I once met the late Jerry Rubin…As the mother of an old friend, herself a refugee from the Nazis, put it: “Ah, Jerry Rubin. Such a nice Jewish boy. Not very bright, mind you. But still, a nice boy.” The description was apt: He wound up as a multi-millionaire and then died from injuries sustained from jaywalking…The new-new left is both vastly more unhinged and vastly shrewder…I worry very much for America.

    • #19
  20. Richard Easton Member
    Richard Easton
    @RichardEaston

    Wolfsheim (View Comment

    I once lived not far from where VDH’s farm is located. I knew and admired farmers, without having the slightest knowledge of or talent for their most noble calling. I also knew the Bay Area and its academic scene–and wound up as a professor, even though I would never want to live in the People’s Republic of Berserkley.

    There is so much about this final episode that inclines me to think it is the best one I’ve heard–and the competition is fierce…

    I am bit older than VDH and remember, when I lived in America, the wild Sixties. There was the old “hard left,” of which I was in my foolish youth a part. But it was (rightly) most unpopular–and we knew it. VDH is absolutely right in seeing the (relatively) popular left that emerged in those days as unserious, though it did, as VDH points out, its own very serious damage.

    A good part of the perverse “fun” of being a leftist in the old days was spouting pretentious nonsense that one knew perfectly well was despised by those outside the (dubious) oasis of upper-middle-class academia. I had already become a conservative by the time I realized that all that talk was genuine intellectual poison.

    In early middle age I spent two years in a private liberal arts university in America and saw just how far the venom had spread.

    I often tell the story of asking students to tell me when America entered the war against Japan and Germany and when the war ended. The closest answer was 1920-194o…My purpose had been positive; I had assumed that American students knew such things and was intending to remind them of their inherent sense of national awareness. Their reaction was hostile: They said I was engaging in a nasty trivia contest. Relating my experience to my then-colleagues, I found myself in worse trouble: Pointing out just how ignorant the kids were was clearly verboten. And then there was the view that the “dumber” the students were, the easier it would be to turn them into warriors against “capitalism,” “imperialism,” “racism,” and “homophobia.”

    It’s surely even worse now…

    I once met the late Jerry Rubin…As the mother of an old friend, herself a refugee from the Nazis, put it: “Ah, Jerry Rubin. Such a nice Jewish boy. Not very bright, mind you. But still, a nice boy.” The description was apt: He wound up as a multi-millionaire and then died from injuries sustained from jaywalking…The new-new left is both vastly more unhinged and vastly shrewder…I worry very much for America.

    Marjorie Rosenberg commented that people in the Old Left were much nicer than than the Néw Left folks.

    • #20
  21. Wolfsheim Member
    Wolfsheim
    @Wolfsheim

    Taras (View Comment):

    I found Prof. Hanson’s new podcast, “The Traditionalist”, here:

    https://vdhanson.podbean.com/

    I see he already has three episodes in the can, so I have a bit of catching up to do!

    Many thanks! Have just watched an episode. Wonderful!

    • #21