On this episode of Take Back Our Schools, Andrew welcomes in Corey DeAngelis to talk about educational freedom and school choice. Corey is the national director of research at the American Federation for Children, the executive director at Educational Freedom Institute, an adjunct scholar at the Cato Institute, and a senior fellow at Reason Foundation.

Andrew and Corey talk about legislation being pursued in many states to give parents choice in their children’s education by funding students rather than public schools. Corey gives advice on how to counter the teachers unions objections to school choice issues and shares his views on what parents can do to join the growing movement to break the public school monopoly.

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Published in: Education, Podcasts

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There are 7 comments.

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  1. genferei Member
    genferei
    @genferei

    How about we get rid of public schools altogether? We don’t have public grocery stores or public clothes stores. 

    • #1
  2. Andrew Gutmann Contributor
    Andrew Gutmann
    @andrewgutmann

    genferei (View Comment):

    How about we get rid of public schools altogether? We don’t have public grocery stores or public clothes stores.

    Mandatory schooling has essentially three purposes: 1. teach kids to be responsible citizens in a democracy. 2. teach the skills necessary to make a decent living. 3. being essentially a jail to keep kids off the streets and out of trouble for 7+ hours a day. Public schools have clearly failed at #1 and #2 but don’t you think we still need #3?

    • #2
  3. genferei Member
    genferei
    @genferei

    Andrew Gutmann (View Comment):

    genferei (View Comment):

    How about we get rid of public schools altogether? We don’t have public grocery stores or public clothes stores.

    Mandatory schooling has essentially three purposes: 1. teach kids to be responsible citizens in a democracy. 2. teach the skills necessary to make a decent living. 3. being essentially a jail to keep kids off the streets and out of trouble for 7+ hours a day. Public schools have clearly failed at #1 and #2 but don’t you think we still need #3?

    I do not think it’s beyond the wit of man to find something more productive than compulsory transgender propaganda to keep youngsters busy. I’m not saying they all have to work down coal mines (but…). Anyway, something occupies the little horrors during the long summer break, and nothing stimulates creativity like a new market opportunity unfettered by statist regulation.

    • #3
  4. DaveSchmidt Coolidge
    DaveSchmidt
    @DaveSchmidt

    Andrew Gutmann (View Comment):

    genferei (View Comment):

    How about we get rid of public schools altogether? We don’t have public grocery stores or public clothes stores.

    Mandatory schooling has essentially three purposes: 1. teach kids to be responsible citizens in a democracy. 2. teach the skills necessary to make a decent living. 3. being essentially a jail to keep kids off the streets and out of trouble for 7+ hours a day. Public schools have clearly failed at #1 and #2 but don’t you think we still need #3?

    Have you been in a public school lately?  

    • #4
  5. Andrew Gutmann Contributor
    Andrew Gutmann
    @andrewgutmann

    DaveSchmidt (View Comment):

    Andrew Gutmann (View Comment):

    genferei (View Comment):

    How about we get rid of public schools altogether? We don’t have public grocery stores or public clothes stores.

    Mandatory schooling has essentially three purposes: 1. teach kids to be responsible citizens in a democracy. 2. teach the skills necessary to make a decent living. 3. being essentially a jail to keep kids off the streets and out of trouble for 7+ hours a day. Public schools have clearly failed at #1 and #2 but don’t you think we still need #3?

    Have you been in a public school lately?

    I don’t think any parents have been in a public school for the last 2 years, at least in many parts of the country. But why do you ask? 

    • #5
  6. Andrew Gutmann Contributor
    Andrew Gutmann
    @andrewgutmann

    genferei (View Comment):

    Andrew Gutmann (View Comment):

    genferei (View Comment):

    How about we get rid of public schools altogether? We don’t have public grocery stores or public clothes stores.

    Mandatory schooling has essentially three purposes: 1. teach kids to be responsible citizens in a democracy. 2. teach the skills necessary to make a decent living. 3. being essentially a jail to keep kids off the streets and out of trouble for 7+ hours a day. Public schools have clearly failed at #1 and #2 but don’t you think we still need #3?

    I do not think it’s beyond the wit of man to find something more productive than compulsory transgender propaganda to keep youngsters busy. I’m not saying they all have to work down coal mines (but…). Anyway, something occupies the little horrors during the long summer break, and nothing stimulates creativity like a new market opportunity unfettered by statist regulation.

    No disagreement on the desire to avoid transgender propaganda. If you are suggesting a private sector solution as an alternative to school then we would obviously have to do away with child labor laws. 

    • #6
  7. genferei Member
    genferei
    @genferei

    Andrew Gutmann (View Comment):

    If you are suggesting a private sector solution as an alternative to school then we would obviously have to do away with child labor laws.

    I’m not sure that follows – there is a whole range of things that could occupy young people that are neither work nor government school. But, sure, let’s do away with Victorian child labor restrictions, too. 

    • #7
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