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  1. Doctor Robert Member
    Doctor Robert
    @DoctorRobert

    It has been time to stop buying Chinese products since about 2015, and especially so since March 2020.

    • #1
  2. Stad Coolidge
    Stad
    @Stad

    Ricochet Audio Network: Is it time to stop buying chinese products?

    It’s long past time.  However, it’s nearly impossible because everything seems to be made over there.  I know the free-traders don’t really care that we 1) shipped many manufacturing jobs to China in exchange for less expensive goods here (and they called it “a good deal” for consumers), and 2) buy goods made with slave labor, or even by non-slave workers who struggle under arduous working conditions.

    No, it’s almost impossible to boycott ChiCom-made products . . .

    • #2
  3. I Walton Member
    I Walton
    @IWalton

    Citizens can do a little but it has to be a systematic government effort and that won’t happen with this bunch and we may be living with this broadly defined bunch for the foreseeable future.  We could decide to get rid them them once it’s clear we can’t do it through 50 state elections.

    • #3
  4. James Salerno Coolidge
    James Salerno
    @JamesSalerno

    It’s slave labor by our standards, but in absence of the handful of cents they receive for a days work, they would receive nothing.

    China has no economic advantage over our manufacturing outside of the human capital. They don’t have access to cheaper materials and they don’t have a technological advantage that allows them to make the product faster. If anyone is opposed to their labor practices, they should be more opposed to our minimum wage requirements and excessive business regulations that allow China’s practices to transpire in the first place.

    • #4
  5. Vince Guerra Member
    Vince Guerra
    @VinceGuerra

    Ricochet Audio Network: “re-education” camps for Uighur Muslims.

    Uighur Muslims? They’ve had a “forced labor” program for persecuted Christians for a generation. Chinese Christians have been slaves making cheap Christmas lights for decades. Welcome to the party, pals. 

    • #5
  6. ToryWarWriter Thatcher
    ToryWarWriter
    @ToryWarWriter

    As I covered in my post, the Chinese might be self correcting on this with a Cultural Revolution 2.0.

    • #6
  7. Franco Member
    Franco
    @Franco

    James Salerno (View Comment):

    It’s slave labor by our standards, but in absence of the handful of cents they receive for a days work, they would receive nothing.

    China has no economic advantage over our manufacturing outside of the human capital. They don’t have access to cheaper materials and they don’t have a technological advantage that allows them to make the product faster. If anyone is opposed to their labor practices, they should be more opposed to our minimum wage requirements and excessive business regulations that allow China’s practices to transpire in the first place.

    I could argue against this whole comment, but let me start with the easiest sentence…

    China has an economic advantage in no having government regulations at all – or ones they can bypass easily. So, land can be allocated, utilities connected, buildings built, with no friction whatsoever.

    It’s not just low pay or slave wages, either. There’s no workmen’s comp for injury, no unemployment, no HR Department to complain to, no ability to sue the company for any kind of discrimination or workplace hazards.

    There are no environmental challenges regarding disposal of byproducts and waste. 

    So even in your fantasy world whereby we repeal the minimum wage, we can’t come close to competing with that.

    • #7
  8. ToryWarWriter Thatcher
    ToryWarWriter
    @ToryWarWriter

    Franco (View Comment):

    James Salerno (View Comment):

    It’s slave labor by our standards, but in absence of the handful of cents they receive for a days work, they would receive nothing.

    China has no economic advantage over our manufacturing outside of the human capital. They don’t have access to cheaper materials and they don’t have a technological advantage that allows them to make the product faster. If anyone is opposed to their labor practices, they should be more opposed to our minimum wage requirements and excessive business regulations that allow China’s practices to transpire in the first place.

    I could argue against this whole comment, but let me start with the easiest sentence…

    China has an economic advantage in no having government regulations at all – or ones they can bypass easily. So, land can be allocated, utilities connected, buildings built, with no friction whatsoever.

    It’s not just low pay or slave wages, either. There’s no workmen’s comp for injury, no unemployment, no HR Department to complain to, no ability to sue the company for any kind of discrimination or workplace hazards.

    There are no environmental challenges regarding disposal of byproducts and waste.

    So even in your fantasy world whereby we repeal the minimum wage, we can’t come close to competing with that.

    They also have the problem, that because of all of that, things are starting to fall apart, one of the reasons for the current problems mentioned in the post.  Its like the Soviet Union where you are not allowed to point out how things arent working without going to jail.  

    • #8
  9. Franco Member
    Franco
    @Franco

    ToryWarWriter (View Comment):

    Franco (View Comment):

    James Salerno (View Comment):

    It’s slave labor by our standards, but in absence of the handful of cents they receive for a days work, they would receive nothing.

    China has no economic advantage over our manufacturing outside of the human capital. They don’t have access to cheaper materials and they don’t have a technological advantage that allows them to make the product faster. If anyone is opposed to their labor practices, they should be more opposed to our minimum wage requirements and excessive business regulations that allow China’s practices to transpire in the first place.

    I could argue against this whole comment, but let me start with the easiest sentence…

    China has an economic advantage in no having government regulations at all – or ones they can bypass easily. So, land can be allocated, utilities connected, buildings built, with no friction whatsoever.

    It’s not just low pay or slave wages, either. There’s no workmen’s comp for injury, no unemployment, no HR Department to complain to, no ability to sue the company for any kind of discrimination or workplace hazards.

    There are no environmental challenges regarding disposal of byproducts and waste.

    So even in your fantasy world whereby we repeal the minimum wage, we can’t come close to competing with that.

    They also have the problem, that because of all of that, things are starting to fall apart, one of the reasons for the current problems mentioned in the post. Its like the Soviet Union where you are not allowed to point out how things arent working without going to jail.

    Or today’s USA. See Michael Flynn, the Capitol trespassers, etc. Not much of a stretch.

    And things aren’t falling apart here, too?

    I really don’t take too much solace in those claims. They have a more efficient system. We had a more efficient and very different system decades ago, but not now. 
    Now it’s the worst of both worlds. The worst part of government edicts, and the worst part of woke environmentalism and human ‘rights’. You have a right to be some weird gender, and can sue anyone who has money for anything, but you must wear a mask and take a vaccine. You can’t speak your mind and you can’t say simple truths out loud.

     

    • #9
  10. HankRhody Freelance Philosopher Contributor
    HankRhody Freelance Philosopher
    @HankRhody

    Just going to drop this here.

    Re, the host’s question about what to do, I think she’s on the right track. I don’t think it’s possible to cut out Chinese products entirely (@SkipSul has a pretty good post about this a while back) but I do think it’s possible and salubrious to target the more egregious corporations cozying up to the communists.

    • #10
  11. Randy Weivoda Moderator
    Randy Weivoda
    @RandyWeivoda

    HankRhody Freelance Philosopher (View Comment):
    I don’t think it’s possible to cut out Chinese products entirely (@SkipSul has a pretty good post about this a while back)

    Is it this one, Hank?

    https://ricochet.com/319787/archives/i-circuit-board/

    Even if it’s not the one you were thinking of, it’s worth re-reading.

    • #11
  12. HankRhody Freelance Philosopher Contributor
    HankRhody Freelance Philosopher
    @HankRhody

    Randy Weivoda (View Comment):

    HankRhody Freelance Philosopher (View Comment):
    I don’t think it’s possible to cut out Chinese products entirely (@ SkipSul has a pretty good post about this a while back)

    Is it this one, Hank?

    https://ricochet.com/319787/archives/i-circuit-board/

    Even if it’s not the one you were thinking of, it’s worth re-reading.

    Also good, but this was the one I was thinking about.

    • #12
  13. Randy Weivoda Moderator
    Randy Weivoda
    @RandyWeivoda

    If you haven’t read Skipsul’s posts mentioned above, do keep in mind that when you buy a product and it says Made in X, it may have components and materials from several different countries.  For very complex products like computers, materials and components might have come from scores of countries.  And the machinery used to make those parts may have come from a lot of different countries.

    Having said that, I decided to look at the labels on my sneakers, since that’s one of the products mentioned in the podcast.  For many years I’ve been buying Asics brand because I find them to be very comfortable.  One pair was made in Vietnam and all the others were made in Indonesia.  So if you want your sneakers without a Made in China label, try Asics.

    • #13
  14. HankRhody Freelance Philosopher Contributor
    HankRhody Freelance Philosopher
    @HankRhody

    Randy Weivoda (View Comment):
    So if you want your sneakers without a Made in China label, try Asics.

    The “Made in Vietnam” label may have been made in China.

    • #14