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  1. HankMorgan Coolidge

    Jeff Goldblum is made of pure awesome. How can someone even question this? You might as well be asking “Why do you like money?” or “Why do you enjoy food?”

    Also, please have Seth dress up as Jeff Goldblum (“New Jersey”) from The Adventures of Buckaroo Bonzai Across the 8th Dimension for both Purim and Halloween from now on.

    • #1
    • February 26, 2018, at 6:57 AM PST
    • 1 like
  2. Bethany Mandel Editor

    HankMorgan (View Comment):
    Jeff Goldblum is made of pure awesome. How can someone even question this? You might as well be asking “Why do you like money?” or “Why do you enjoy food?”

    Also, please have Seth dress up as Jeff Goldblum (“New Jersey”) from The Adventures of Buckaroo Bonzai Across the 8th Dimension for both Purim and Halloween from now on.

    Thank God he doesn’t know how to check Ricochet comments.

    • #2
    • February 26, 2018, at 11:39 AM PST
    • 1 like
  3. HankMorgan Coolidge

    Bethany Mandel (View Comment):

    HankMorgan (View Comment):
    Jeff Goldblum is made of pure awesome. How can someone even question this? You might as well be asking “Why do you like money?” or “Why do you enjoy food?”

    Also, please have Seth dress up as Jeff Goldblum (“New Jersey”) from The Adventures of Buckaroo Bonzai Across the 8th Dimension for both Purim and Halloween from now on.

    Thank God he doesn’t know how to check Ricochet comments.

    Life finds a way!

    • #3
    • February 26, 2018, at 12:09 PM PST
    • Like
  4. Jim Wright Coolidge

    *looks for Seth on Twitter*

    • #4
    • February 26, 2018, at 6:44 PM PST
    • Like
  5. Full Size Tabby Member

    re the mess on the streets of San Francisco: I would challenge the conclusion in that report Seth was reading that tried to assert that there’s a mess on the streets of San Francisco but not in the slums of third world countries because in San Francisco authorities force the homeless to move around while in the third world slums the people stay put. I would want to see some information on who the people are. My suspicion is that a large portion of the residents of third world slums are “normal” people (including families) who are just poor because they live in a poor country. As opposed to the people on the streets of San Francisco, who are almost entirely mentally ill, drug addicts, or just refuse to live “normally.” In other words, I suspect the populations are completely different, and therefore it would be incorrect to say that different results are due to different handling by authorities.

    • #5
    • February 27, 2018, at 5:43 AM PST
    • Like
  6. Full Size Tabby Member

    Bethany, the Stanford campus is completely different from the streets of San Francisco. On my last visit to the area, the homeless around the Stanford campus were staying in their motor homes and vans parked along the street because they’re engineers and other working people who just can’t afford to buy or rent quarters in the area. Much cleaner than San Francisco’s.

    But, you should take in San Francisco on at least one day. You will certainly see a variety of people. The steepness of the hills is something to behold. Our favorite is walking through Chinatown, mostly to see the assortment of food items you will see nowhere else. The children would probably enjoy the sea lions of Pier 39, which is not far from Fisherman’s Wharf (though at Fisherman’s Wharf you will see more tourists than residents). (By the way, no matter how warm it is in Palo Alto when you leave in the morning, take coats or sweatshirts – it WILL be cold along the bayfront in San Francisco.) Union Square should be a relatively safe place to watch a variety of people. There are great museums for children in several parts of the city. [We loved going to children’s museums in different cities we visited, and then comparing and contrasting them, when our children were little – but they’re your age, so that was a while ago.] Clam chowder in a sourdough bowl from Boudin’s Bakery is a tradition (though it may not be Kosher). The bread itself is fantastic, even if you don’t have it with soup. Of course the cable cars are unique, though getting on one among the crowds may be a challenge. The cable car museum is interesting if your oldest has any mechanical inclinations. Your children probably aren’t old enough to appreciate Alcatraz. DO NOT go near the Castro District with your children unless you are prepared to explain to them why naked men are doing strange things with each other in public.

    • #6
    • February 27, 2018, at 6:11 AM PST
    • Like
  7. Full Size Tabby Member

    I was unaware of the traditions of costumes and gift baskets associated with Purim. I am a Christian and I thank you for the information. I have always enjoyed the story of Esther, particularly how Haman’s plan to aggrandize himself backfired.

    • #7
    • February 27, 2018, at 6:17 AM PST
    • Like