How Can We Truly Fix US Healthcare?

Avik Roy is the President of the Foundation for Research on Equal Opportunity, aka FREOPP, a policy editor at Forbes.com and a former advisor to three Republican presidential candidates – Romney, Perry, and Rubio. Avik joins Carol Roth to do a deep dive into what truly ails healthcare in the US (pun entirely intended) and what works- and doesn’t work- around the world. Carol and Avik discuss the challenges of the current cronyist system and all of the issues from how insurance is purchased to why drugs are so much more expensive in the United States. It’s an incredible hour, where you are sure to learn a ton and reshape your views on what makes sense for healthcare going forward, regardless of party politics.

 

You can also follow Avik on Twitter here and follow FREOPP here.

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There are 3 comments.

  1. Stad Thatcher

    So easy:

    1. Allow insurance companies to sell policies across state lines (like most other insurance)
    2. Allow insurance companies to come up with their own combinations of coverage, or offer a la carte
    3. Allow health insurance payments and out-of-pocket medical expenses to be tax deductable.

    Now, to download the podcast and see what Avik says!

     

    • #1
    • September 4, 2019, at 1:20 PM PST
    • 1 like
  2. KyleBauer Coolidge

    As someone who speaks from 30 years of healthcare experience this continues to be the worthless comparison of the US to other countries in that we can simply adopt their policies and apply it our own system.

    For further reading (I admit it can be pretty dry) read American Healthcare Economy Illustrated by Chris Cononver.

    Essentially the US is by far the leader in healthcare innovation. The US has been the country of origin for 20 of the top 27 medical innovations from 1975-2000 ranked by primary care physicians. Additionally there have been 99 recipients of the Nobel Prize in medicine and physiology sine 1948 – 60 of those were from the US and only 39 were from the EU, Switzerland, Canada, Japan and Australia even though that group of countries have twice the population of the US. Early innovators typically bear the higher cost of innovation. Which begs the question of if not the US then who will push medical innovation forward?

    Bottom line, as countries become more wealthy they are able to spend more money beyond basic items like food and housing. So the comparison should not be what Germans spend today on healthcare as a percent of their GDP but what they would spend on healthcare when they had the GDP of the US. The data shows a much different picture.

    • #2
    • September 4, 2019, at 7:20 PM PST
    • 1 like
  3. Zed11 Lincoln

    Love this one. If only we had more elected officials who could navigate this.

    Hey I was serious about you going on Malice’s Your Welcome! ;-)

    • #3
    • September 6, 2019, at 8:48 AM PST
    • Like