Meet The Press

We know you like it when the hosts get into it and we know you like it when one of them gets triggered by a certain Chief Executive. So –no spoilers!– we think you’ll enjoy the opening segment of today’s Big Show. But stick around, because we want to introduce you to two members of the media we think you ought to be aware of. First up: Alex Berenson, once a card carrying member of the elite media (the New York Times) and now a novelist who does some independent journalism on the side. His work on COVID over the past six months (available on Twitter and on his website  is not to be missed. Then, meet Andrew Beaton, who covers sports for the Wall Street Journal. His no nonsense reporting on COVID and sports and the impact of the social justice movement is not to be missed. But that’s not all: we’ve got a new Lileks Post of The Week, courtesy of  @DoctorRobert  (it’s about oboes). Finally, we lost a great one this week. Well, those of us who were aware  of him did. Guess which one of our podcasters is not really aware of the contributions to the culture Edward Van Halen left us?

Music from this week’s show: Dance The Night Away by Van Halen

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  1. EHerring Coolidge
    EHerring
    @EHerring

    Miffed White Male (View Comment):

    EHerring (View Comment):

    RufusRJones (View Comment):
    I got into the NHL after my brother-in-law explained the rules to me.

    NHL is a sport that really must be seen in person. You need to see the whole rink, the line changes, etc.

    I’ve been to a lot of IHL/AHL games (Milwaukee Admirals), but never to an NHL game. Is there a significant difference?

    Almost all my live games were AHL, Hampton Roads Admirals, Pensacola Pilots, Columbia Inferno. We did drive up to DC once or twice to see the Caps because Gretzky was on the other side, and to Dallas to see Modano play.  NHL is so much faster.

    • #61
  2. Mr. Michael Garrett Lincoln
    Mr. Michael Garrett
    @MichaelGarrett

    The line about football representing the worst of America for combining sporadic acts of violence punctuated by committee meetings I recall hearing from George Will.

    I wonder about many many other times people have mistaken his words for those of John Cleese?  And vice versa?

    • #62
  3. Mark Alexander Coolidge
    Mark Alexander
    @MarkAlexander

    Rob’s rant sent me back to reflecting on why I didn’t vote for Trump in 2016 (for all the principled reasons), and I will in 2020, with relish, hoping for a landslide that will bury the Left into a coma. I think John Yoo’s book, “Defender in Chief” sums it up well.

    In terms of actions and results, Trump is the Republican we have all been looking for at least since Reagan. All but Trump roll over, time and again, co-opted by DC/Globalist culture.

    Though I agree with a lot of Rob’s distaste for Trump’s tweets, comments and gaucheries, and outright silliness, there is no way ANY Republican would have accomplished half of what Trump accomplished in the face of such overwhelming personal, political, and illegal attacks, without some kind of armor.

    Trump’s character and personality are his armor. They are what keeps him on his feet as he double-punches the opposition and makes such extraordinary conservative accomplishments.

    No other candidate had the armor. They all wanted money, and to be liked, which is deadly to any principled politician.

    I hear the siren song of Jonah G. and John P., among others, in Rob’s voice–all of whom fail to understand Trump’s appeal to core Americans, who have taken decades of abuse from the Left, and now the truly radical Far Left, and have had hopes dashed time after time by weak-kneed Republicans. Finally, a bruiser who hits back, who stands, whether originally meaning to or not, for the American ideals. Sometimes the job brings out the character needed in historic measures.

    And Trump is history. For many of us, as much as we wish a greater ability to articulate and be as smooth as Reagan, we recognize that such a wish may have proved a chink in his armor that resists the incredibly corrupt media, corrupt politicians, corrupt academicians, corrupt policy institutions, and corrupt law-enforcement and intelligence agencies. And especially the corrupt Obama administration, now proven–Proven–to be the most despicable in American history.

    • #63
  4. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Mark Alexander (View Comment):

    Rob’s rant sent me back to reflecting on why I didn’t vote for Trump in 2016 (for all the principled reasons), and I will in 2020, with relish, hoping for a landslide that will bury the Left into a coma. I think John Yoo’s book, “Defender in Chief” sums it up well.

    In terms of actions and results, Trump is the Republican we have all been looking for at least since Reagan. All but Trump roll over, time and again, co-opted by DC/Globalist culture.

    Though I agree with a lot of Rob’s distaste for Trump’s tweets, comments and gaucheries, and outright silliness, there is no way ANY Republican would have accomplished half of what Trump accomplished in the face of such overwhelming personal, political, and illegal attacks, without some kind of armor.

    Trump’s character and personality are his armor. They are what keeps him on his feet as he double-punches the opposition and makes such extraordinary conservative accomplishments.

    No other candidate had the armor. They all wanted money, and to be liked, which is deadly to any principled politician.

    I hear the siren song of Jonah G. and John P., among others, in Rob’s voice–all of whom fail to understand Trump’s appeal to core Americans, who have taken decades of abuse from the Left, and now the truly radical Far Left, and have had hopes dashed time after time by weak-kneed Republicans. Finally, a bruiser who hits back, who stands, whether originally meaning to or not, for the American ideals. Sometimes the job brings out the character needed in historic measures.

    And Trump is history. For many of us, as much as we wish a greater ability to articulate and be a smooth as Reagan, we recognize that such a wish may have proved a chink in his armor that resists the incredibly corrupt media, corrupt politicians, corrupt academicians, corrupt policy institutions, and corrupt law-enforcement and intelligence agencies. And especially the corrupt Obama administration, now proven–Proven–to be the most despicable in American history.

    Ricochet needs another button, for Like-To-The-Nth-Degree.

    • #64
  5. Al Sparks Thatcher
    Al Sparks
    @AlSparks

    It’s interesting to hear James Lileks get into a heated argument, which really isn’t his public persona. He usually projects Minnesota Nice. I guess the gang has gotten feedback that these heated discussions are popular. And that both Peter and James ganged up on Rob is probably popular too, judging by his unpopularity in last week’s comments.

    On football. I’m a casual fan, and the only reason I’m as much of a fan as I am is because I grew up very near West Texas and high school football was popular where I grew up. In addition, during my junior year, my high school team became New Mexico state champions in an undefeated season. It really affected (or infected) the student body.

    But I look back on that period as being excessive. The question Peter asked about the value of sports was a little vague. Obviously recreational sports do have value for the players. And on a small scale, watching a neighbor play on a local amateur team has benefits to the community. But a better question would have been the benefits of high performance professional sports to a community versus the lower scale teams I talked about above.

    On hockey. I didn’t become a hockey fan until I started watching my local NCAA Division I team play. For awhile I traveled with the team for some games, and saw them play such stellar teams like Michigan University, Michigan State, and even one weekend of Minnesota University. And since I traveled, I got to see those teams in their own arenas. The Minnesota coach at the time, Don Lucia, coached in Alaska. Once I watched in person for so many games, I found that watching professional hockey on high definition television was an entertaining experience. With high definition, following a small puck isn’t as much of an issue that it once was. And slow motion playback highlights the high performance of the goalie and adds to the experience.

    Regarding the lower scores in hockey, my observation is that high scoring sports is an American obsession. It’s one reason why soccer (what the rest of the world calls football) has had a long slog catching on in the United States, but remains popular in the rest of the world.

    And remember that hockey is essentially a Canadian import into the United States, and not natively American like football, baseball, and basketball.

    • #65
  6. Vince Guerra Inactive
    Vince Guerra
    @VinceGuerra

    For James:

    Rob gets a lump of coal in his stocking. 

    • #66
  7. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Vince Guerra (View Comment):

    For James:

    Rob gets a lump of coal in his stocking.

    Starting in my late 20s I suppose, I developed kind of a thing for “Guitar Goddesses.”

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JP18XTBkK60

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1nB73gxFkUg

    (Don’t miss the very end!)

    • #67
  8. Annefy Member
    Annefy
    @Annefy

    Mark Alexander (View Comment):

    Rob’s rant sent me back to reflecting on why I didn’t vote for Trump in 2016 (for all the principled reasons), and I will in 2020, with relish, hoping for a landslide that will bury the Left into a coma. I think John Yoo’s book, “Defender in Chief” sums it up well.

    In terms of actions and results, Trump is the Republican we have all been looking for at least since Reagan. All but Trump roll over, time and again, co-opted by DC/Globalist culture.

    Though I agree with a lot of Rob’s distaste for Trump’s tweets, comments and gaucheries, and outright silliness, there is no way ANY Republican would have accomplished half of what Trump accomplished in the face of such overwhelming personal, political, and illegal attacks, without some kind of armor.

    Trump’s character and personality are his armor. They are what keeps him on his feet as he double-punches the opposition and makes such extraordinary conservative accomplishments.

    -snip

    I hear the siren song of Jonah G. and John P., among others, in Rob’s voice–all of whom fail to understand Trump’s appeal to core Americans, who have taken decades of abuse from the Left, and now the truly radical Far Left, and have had hopes dashed time after time by weak-kneed Republicans. Finally, a bruiser who hits back, who stands, whether originally meaning to or not, for the American ideals. Sometimes the job brings out the character needed in historic measures.

    And Trump is history. For many of us, as much as we wish a greater ability to articulate and be as smooth as Reagan, we recognize that such a wish may have proved a chink in his armor that resists the incredibly corrupt media, corrupt politicians, corrupt academicians, corrupt policy institutions, and corrupt law-enforcement and intelligence agencies. And especially the corrupt Obama administration, now proven–Proven–to be the most despicable in American history.

    This was very well said.

    I had an epiphany in my marriage 30 years ago. JY didn’t handle something correctly and it really made me mad. After a couple of days of thinking about it, I realized that the same “flaw” that caused him to handle something incorrectly was, as a husband, my favorite part of him. So at 30 years old my epiphany was that you don’t get to remove the part of someone you don’t like, because that is attached to parts that you really like. I won’t say it saved my marriage (never was in trouble) but a lot of marriages I’ve witnessed could have been saved with that realization.

    Which is a long way to say that Rob claims we “Trumpers” are too emotionally invested in Trump. I find Rob to be the one reacting emotionally, constantly (and hysterically in this podcast) harping on all the negative qualities. He sounded like a lot of unhappy wives I’ve known …

    • #68
  9. Al Sparks Thatcher
    Al Sparks
    @AlSparks

    Regarding the argument about Trump.

    First, Rob’s argument that we have to try and persuade people to our side, instead of screaming at them, I’ll point out that our side is actually politer than the left. We’re not rioting in the streets.

    And the reason that Trump won in 2016 is yes, Hillary Clinton was also unlikable, but also Bush, McCain, and Romney were too above it all, and wouldn’t fight to their level. I don’t expect them to bring a gun to a knife fight, but when the gun enters the first skirmish, I do expect them to bring that gun (metaphorically speaking, of course).

    Trump’s weakness, of course, is he wouldn’t or couldn’t turn the viciousness and braggadocio off. Rich Lowry recently wrote that Trump is letting down his own team. I agree with that.

    On the other hand, Trump actually spent more time than the typical Republican in campaigning in black neighborhoods.

    The fundamental problem with our ideology is we’re asking people to vote for a government that gives out less free stuff. And it’s becoming increasingly clear to me, that the electorate has to be manipulated, often dishonestly so, to vote for a particular candidate. The most effective technique seems to be fear.

    I’ve known this for awhile, but recent events have emphasized this to me.

    I’m so disillusioned with most of my fellow citizens.

    • #69
  10. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Annefy (View Comment):

    Mark Alexander (View Comment):

    -snip

    I hear the siren song of Jonah G. and John P., among others, in Rob’s voice–all of whom fail to understand Trump’s appeal to core Americans, who have taken decades of abuse from the Left, and now the truly radical Far Left, and have had hopes dashed time after time by weak-kneed Republicans. Finally, a bruiser who hits back, who stands, whether originally meaning to or not, for the American ideals. Sometimes the job brings out the character needed in historic measures.

    And Trump is history. For many of us, as much as we wish a greater ability to articulate and be as smooth as Reagan, we recognize that such a wish may have proved a chink in his armor that resists the incredibly corrupt media, corrupt politicians, corrupt academicians, corrupt policy institutions, and corrupt law-enforcement and intelligence agencies. And especially the corrupt Obama administration, now proven–Proven–to be the most despicable in American history.

    This was very well said.

    I had an epiphany in my marriage 30 years ago. JY didn’t handle something correctly and it really made me mad. After a couple of days of thinking about it, I realized that the same “flaw” that caused him to handle something incorrectly was, as a husband, my favorite part of him. So at 30 years old my epiphany was that you don’t get to remove the part of someone you don’t like, because that is attached to parts that you really like. I won’t say it saved my marriage (never was in trouble) but a lot of marriages I’ve witnessed could have been saved with that realization.

    Which is a long way to say that Rob claims we “Trumpers” are too emotionally invested in Trump. I find Rob to be the one reacting emotionally, constantly (and hysterically in this podcast) harping on all the negative qualities. He sounded like a lot of unhappy wives I’ve known …

    Where is that stupid Like-To-The-Nth-Degree button???

    And really, the much bigger problem than “We Trumpers” that people like Rob like to disparage, are the apparently HUGE number of people who will vote for an objectively disastrous (for the country, for the world…) candidate that they somehow “like.”  (Which is especially crazy for such a hateful, unlikeable person as Biden.)

    • #70
  11. EHerring Coolidge
    EHerring
    @EHerring

    There is a difference between Rob and the NTs like those at Bulwark and Lincoln Project…while I might not always agree with Rob, it always seems like a small disagreement among friends. With the real NTs, I feel like they not only disagree with me but have disdain for me and those like me. They come across as the elitist who think they know better than the unwashed rabble and prefer socialist Democrats to people like me. Rob is more like the polite discussions friends have over a drink after work. I love the podcast and eagerly look forward to it each week. 

    • #71
  12. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    EHerring (View Comment):

    There is a difference between Rob and the NTs like those at Bulwark and Lincoln Project…while I might not always agree with Rob, it always seems like a small disagreement among friends. With the real NTs, I feel like they not only disagree with me but have disdain for me and those like me. They come across as the elitist who think they know better than the unwashed rabble and prefer socialist Democrats to people like me. Rob is more like the polite discussions friends have over a drink after work. I love the podcast and eagerly look forward to it each week.

    It sounded to me like Rob thinks “Trump Supporters” are just people who have some kind of crush on the man and don’t see how bad he really is, and why it’s therefore perfectly understandable why the left would go insane.

    • #72
  13. ToryWarWriter Reagan
    ToryWarWriter
    @ToryWarWriter

    I bet the Never Trumpers would have all voted for McLellan and would have done a lot of handwringing as Sherman marched to the sea.

     

    • #73
  14. Theodoric of Freiberg Member
    Theodoric of Freiberg
    @TheodoricofFreiberg

    Al Sparks (View Comment):
    And it’s becoming increasingly clear to me, that the electorate has to be manipulated, often dishonestly so, to vote for a particular candidate. The most effective technique seems to be fear.

    Nixon said it best: “People react to fear, not love; they don’t teach that in Sunday School, but it’s true.”

    • #74
  15. EDISONPARKS Member
    EDISONPARKS
    @user_54742

    kedavis (View Comment):

    EHerring (View Comment):

    There is a difference between Rob and the NTs like those at Bulwark and Lincoln Project…while I might not always agree with Rob, it always seems like a small disagreement among friends. With the real NTs, I feel like they not only disagree with me but have disdain for me and those like me. They come across as the elitist who think they know better than the unwashed rabble and prefer socialist Democrats to people like me. Rob is more like the polite discussions friends have over a drink after work. I love the podcast and eagerly look forward to it each week.

    It sounded to me like Rob thinks “Trump Supporters” are just people who have some kind of crush on the man and don’t see how bad he really is, and why it’s therefore perfectly understandable why the left would go insane.

    I believe Trump is flawed in many of the ways the Left and the NT say he is.

    However, Trump’s one quality which makes him invaluable to the Conservative movement is that Trump is so hated by the (D)/MSM/Culture Combine/(NT let’s all try to get along pushovers) that Trump correctly has no expectation the other “side” will ever even consider compromise.

    So Trump can forge ahead like a bull in a china(no pun intended) shop and install judges, attempt to deconstruct (or at least expose) the permanent bureaucracy (ie: deep state), reduce regulation, unleash US fossil fuel production (ie: make energy affordable for everyone), Realign our global trading arrangements, Reduce our global military presence, reduce the Federal Tax burden to help reduce unemployment and increase GDP, flush out the corrupt career corruptocrat Obama holdover DOJ/FBI/StateDept/IC, ….. I could go on ….

    …. And according to Rob and the NT this is bad …. I couldn’t disagree more.

    The NT socialize with Lefty(D)’s who pretend to offer some consensus but would sooner just smile in Rob’s face and thrust a subtle shiv directly into his chest and quietly take Rob and his bend over/panties at the ankles conservatism right off the face of the earth.

    • #75
  16. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    Mark Alexander (View Comment):
    I think John Yoo’s book, “Defender in Chief” sums it up well.

    I would say about 90% of never Trump is very stupid about this.

     

    Mark Alexander (View Comment):
    there is no way ANY Republican would have accomplished half of what Trump accomplished in the face of such overwhelming personal, political, and illegal attacks,

    ***B I N G O***

    Mark Alexander (View Comment):
    And Trump is history. For many of us, as much as we wish a greater ability to articulate and be as smooth as Reagan,

    Ronald Reagan does not apply now, and furthermore he’s not as great as everybody makes him out to be. The big thing he did was he cut Paul Volker loose. Very few politicians would have the character to do that. He also beat the Soviet Union.  Beyond that, I don’t think he’s that big of a deal. Pay the one dollar to watch the long David Stockman interview on real vision and get back to me.

     

    Mark Alexander (View Comment):
    For many of us, as much as we wish a greater ability to articulate and be as smooth as Reagan, we recognize that such a wish may have proved a chink in his armor that resists the incredibly corrupt media, corrupt politicians, corrupt academicians, corrupt policy institutions, and corrupt law-enforcement and intelligence agencies. And especially the corrupt Obama administration, now proven–Proven–to be the most despicable in American history.

    You can’t argue with this. 

    Great post Mark.

     

    • #76
  17. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    Al Sparks (View Comment):

    The fundamental problem with our ideology is we’re asking people to vote for a government that gives out less free stuff. And it’s becoming increasingly clear to me, that the electorate has to be manipulated, often dishonestly so, to vote for a particular candidate. The most effective technique seems to be fear.

    I’ve known this for awhile, but recent events have emphasized this to me.

    DING. DING. DING. 

    Woodrow Wilson and the Federal Reserve are to blame. It’s structural. I go on and on about it and nobody gets it. 

    We need to take as much ground as we can before the bond market collapses.

    The other thing is, there are tons of people that are losing out from the bad policies around automation and globalized labor. That is what the Republicans can’t deal with using traditional thinking. You have to listen closely to what Steve Bannon and all of his economic guys like Curtis Ellis are saying. The easier way to understand it is to listen to interviews of Rep Dave Brat.

    • #77
  18. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    EHerring (View Comment):

    There is a difference between Rob and the NTs like those at Bulwark and Lincoln Project…while I might not always agree with Rob, it always seems like a small disagreement among friends. With the real NTs, I feel like they not only disagree with me but have disdain for me and those like me. They come across as the elitist who think they know better than the unwashed rabble and prefer socialist Democrats to people like me. Rob is more like the polite discussions friends have over a drink after work. I love the podcast and eagerly look forward to it each week.

    I say this over and over. Stay the hell away from the “organized” Never Trump. 90% of them are stupid or they are arguing in bad faith.

    • #78
  19. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    RufusRJones (View Comment):

    Al Sparks (View Comment):

    The fundamental problem with our ideology is we’re asking people to vote for a government that gives out less free stuff. And it’s becoming increasingly clear to me, that the electorate has to be manipulated, often dishonestly so, to vote for a particular candidate. The most effective technique seems to be fear.

    I’ve known this for awhile, but recent events have emphasized this to me.

    DING. DING. DING.

    Woodrow Wilson and the Federal Reserve are to blame. It’s structural. I go on and on about it and nobody gets it.

    We get it – some of us do, anyway, perhaps even most – but we recognize that trying to convince a lot of people of the wisdom of voting Republican because of deflation and global employment trends etc, is… unlikely to succeed?

     

     

    • #79
  20. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    kedavis (View Comment):

    RufusRJones (View Comment):

    Al Sparks (View Comment):

    The fundamental problem with our ideology is we’re asking people to vote for a government that gives out less free stuff. And it’s becoming increasingly clear to me, that the electorate has to be manipulated, often dishonestly so, to vote for a particular candidate. The most effective technique seems to be fear.

    I’ve known this for awhile, but recent events have emphasized this to me.

    DING. DING. DING.

    Woodrow Wilson and the Federal Reserve are to blame. It’s structural. I go on and on about it and nobody gets it.

    We get it – some of us do, anyway, perhaps even most – but we recognize that trying to convince a lot of people of the wisdom of voting Republican because of deflation and global employment trends etc, is… unlikely to succeed?

    Everything is inflationist. The government is inflationist. The financial system is inflationist. Everybody with a mortgage is in inflationist. Yada yada yada. What should make you mad is all of this BS about automation and globalized trade is some thing that we just have to suffer with for so many citizens. “Those poor bastards.” The intelligent way to deal with this is to simply have a deflationist central bank. The problem is you can’t do this for a whole bunch of reasons including Geo political reasons. Your  basic Republican will not get this. Blah blah blah Adam Smith. 

    So you have to work around the edges as powerfully as you can. I’m not going to explain it here. If you listen to interviews of David stockmen around September 2016, that is a very good explanation. Tom Woods and Contra Krugman.

    The time to work on this was 30 years ago when the Soviet union fell. Of course we are too stupid for this. Alan Greenspan did the exact wrong thing by juicing the economy starting around 1996 or arguably 1987. He should have been warning Congress about automation and globalized trade and he should’ve kept interest rates higher not lower.

    Now you’ve got stupid kids that paid through the nose for college and can’t get jobs so they riot with antifa. Manufacturing jobs have been outsourced for no reason. Then all of that wage deflation puts pressure on other wages.

     

    • #80
  21. Headedwest Inactive
    Headedwest
    @Headedwest

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Headedwest (View Comment):

    Rob is getting worse. I don’t need that aggravation in my life right now.

    It’s a very small part of the whole thing. The rest is worth hearing.

    I listen while exercise walking. The skip forward buttons are hard to see in daylight. Not worth the effort.

    • #81
  22. Functionary Coolidge
    Functionary
    @Functionary

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Vince Guerra (View Comment):

    For James:

    Rob gets a lump of coal in his stocking.

    Starting in my late 20s I suppose, I developed kind of a thing for “Guitar Goddesses.”

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JP18XTBkK60

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1nB73gxFkUg

    (Don’t miss the very end!)

    That was interesting.  The second video has actual thighs.

    • #82
  23. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Functionary (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Vince Guerra (View Comment):

    For James:

    Rob gets a lump of coal in his stocking.

    Starting in my late 20s I suppose, I developed kind of a thing for “Guitar Goddesses.”

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JP18XTBkK60

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1nB73gxFkUg

    (Don’t miss the very end!)

    That was interesting. The second video has actual thighs.

    This is the song that made them famous:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jC9AUR-iTo0

    Their next album “Eight Arms To Hold You” had the “sequel” song, “Volcano Girls”:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qyVSKydUxKk

    Musically, my favorite might be “Forsythia”:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8HTp4bdgnkY

    Along with everything by Heather Nova, most of Juliana Hatfield…

    In mellower moods I really like The Like…

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KtMKka658Zk

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RkraKVl162c

     

    • #83
  24. Andrew Inactive
    Andrew
    @user_478927

    I find it absolutely fascinating that a man who’s day job is in Hollywood, but who focuses all his side hustle efforts on a niche conservative website, nevertheless lectures the people who pay for his failed enterprise about echo chambers. Just… wow. Galaxy brain stuff right there.  A pay-to-comment/see posts conservative website is really reaching across the aisle. 

    • #84
  25. EJHill Podcaster
    EJHill
    @EJHill

    Behind the scenes of the show’s big cultural moment…

    • #85
  26. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Andrew (View Comment):

    I find it absolutely fascinating that a man who’s day job is in Hollywood, but who focuses all his side hustle efforts on a niche conservative website, nevertheless lectures the people who pay for his failed enterprise about echo chambers. Just… wow. Galaxy brain stuff right there. A pay-to-comment/see posts conservative website is really reaching across the aisle.

    Well, Rob is also a co-founder, but I have to wonder if maybe he figured – like most of the “Ricochet Establishment” seemed to – that Trump would be rejected by his… membership?

    • #86
  27. Andrew Inactive
    Andrew
    @user_478927

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Andrew (View Comment):

    I find it absolutely fascinating that a man who’s day job is in Hollywood, but who focuses all his side hustle efforts on a niche conservative website, nevertheless lectures the people who pay for his failed enterprise about echo chambers. Just… wow. Galaxy brain stuff right there. A pay-to-comment/see posts conservative website is really reaching across the aisle.

    Well, Rob is also a co-founder, but I have to wonder if maybe he figured – like most of the “Ricochet Establishment” seemed to – that Trump would be rejected by his… membership?

    I’m sure they initially thought that, and now many of them believe we are all going to be punished for our transgressions (and aren’t entirely displeased at the notion). But all that aside, it’s just so bizarre to me that a co-founder of Ricochet is so passionate about blaming conservatives for not doing a better job reaching across the aisle when he’s been spending *years* building a conservative echo chamber. 

    • #87
  28. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Andrew (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Andrew (View Comment):

    I find it absolutely fascinating that a man who’s day job is in Hollywood, but who focuses all his side hustle efforts on a niche conservative website, nevertheless lectures the people who pay for his failed enterprise about echo chambers. Just… wow. Galaxy brain stuff right there. A pay-to-comment/see posts conservative website is really reaching across the aisle.

    Well, Rob is also a co-founder, but I have to wonder if maybe he figured – like most of the “Ricochet Establishment” seemed to – that Trump would be rejected by his… membership?

    I’m sure they initially thought that, and now many of them believe we are all going to be punished for our transgressions (and aren’t entirely displeased at the notion). But all that aside, it’s just so bizarre to me that a co-founder of Ricochet is so passionate about blaming conservatives for not doing a better job reaching across the aisle when he’s been spending *years* building a conservative echo chamber.

    Well, aside from wondering how much “building” work Rob himself has done… I don’t know how to finish that sentence…

    Did Rob actually do a lot of writing here, back when I was just listening to the podcasts but not looking at the site?

    • #88
  29. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    kedavis (View Comment):
    Did Rob actually do a lot of writing here, back when I was just listening to the podcasts but not looking at the site?

    Never a lot, but he was the one urging people to become members. He did plenty of that.

    • #89
  30. Nerina Bellinger Inactive
    Nerina Bellinger
    @NerinaBellinger

    I haven’t listened to this podcast in 3 years (mostly owing to Rob’s constant disparagement of Trump – it just gets annoying after a while) but Alex Berenson is hard to resist.  He has been on top of Covid since the beginning.  If you haven’t ready his booklets regarding the pandemic, I strongly suggest checking them out.  

    @markalexander great comment!

    • #90
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