In an homage to the star-stuffed 70s disaster movies they both know and love so well, Jonah invites Commentary magazine editor and GLoP Culture co-host John Podhoretz on for a wide-ranging discussion on movies, TV, New York, neoconservatism, and much more. In fitting ’70s disaster movie fashion, a special guest star makes a surprise cameo. When Worlds Collide? More like When Mad, Mad, Mad Worlds Collide!

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There are 19 comments.

  1. Member
    RPD

    The flying turtle was Gamera. It was done very cheesy but I loved watching those on Saturday afternoon TV, usually on a UHF station.

    • #1
    • February 9, 2018 at 8:27 am
    • 1 like
  2. Coolidge

    Loved the very special episode of the Remnant!

    I enjoyed the stories of Jonah’s childhood. I am in my 30’s so I didn’t grow up in this era, but I can’t believe how people lived in NYC during the 70’s. Watching movies from back then and documentaries like Blackout makes it seem like NYC was a real world dystopia. How did we let it get so bad?

    • #2
    • February 9, 2018 at 10:12 am
    • 2 likes
  3. Thatcher

    Oh gentlemen … the flying turtle monster is Gamera. How can I trust your examination of the history and philosophy of neo-conservatism if I can trust you to get Gamera’s name right.

    • #3
    • February 9, 2018 at 10:57 am
    • 1 like
  4. Member

    Texmoor (View Comment):
    Loved the very special episode of the Remnant!

    I enjoyed the stories of Jonah’s childhood. I am in my 30’s so I didn’t grow up in this era, but I can’t believe how people lived in NYC during the 70’s. Watching movies from back then and documentaries like Blackout makes it seem like NYC was a real world dystopia. How did we let it get so bad?

    We listened to the Left!

    We woke up when Rudy Giuliani rode to town!

    • #4
    • February 9, 2018 at 11:27 am
    • Like
  5. Member

    I’d listen to the podcast but I’m waiting for the RiffTRAX version.

    • #5
    • February 9, 2018 at 3:00 pm
    • 1 like
  6. Coolidge

    Jonah: We both grew up in New York City in the 1970s, and while the city around us was becoming a bleak hellhole — I was mugged several times before I turned 12 —

    John: Four times for me.

    Jonah: Yeah, and I had to walk six or seven blocks out of my way to walk two blocks to my school because it was unsafe for me to cross Columbus and Amsterdam …

    This is probably stuff that Jonah and John think “everybody knows“. In fact, the liberal media soft-pedaled this at the time and, since then, have dropped it down the memory hole, complete. DeBlasio should be hit over the head with this every day.

    I was a Columbia undergrad around the same time. I managed to avoid becoming a victim, but Wolfgang Friedman, a world-famous law professor, was murdered one short block north of where I was living at the time (Plimpton Hall). I could see the spot where he bled out from my window.

    • #6
    • February 9, 2018 at 4:01 pm
    • 1 like
  7. Coolidge

    The Poseidon Adventure (1972): The “hip priest” played by Gene Hackman was actually a minister; who was convinced that the ordeal was a test sent by God, so he didn’t give up hope and kept trying to lead survivors to safety. He eventually has his “moment on the Cross” when he realizes he’s not going to make it — but some members of the group he was leading do.

    I thought it was a great illustration of how religious faith can give one strength. Perhaps not surprisingly, the character was left out of the soulless 2006 remake.

    By the way, Roger Ebert gave The Adventures of Bullwhip Griffin three stars out of four, as not quite up to the level of a Disney classic like The Absent-Minded Professor. I have faint, positive recollections of the film, but I can’t even remember if there really was a bullwhip involved, or if Roddy McDowell’s character got that nickname from the speed of his punch in boxing.

    • #7
    • February 9, 2018 at 4:15 pm
    • Like
  8. Inactive

    Malcolm McDowell was in Caligula, not Roddy. Or so I’ve heard.

    • #8
    • February 9, 2018 at 4:54 pm
    • Like
  9. Member

    This was a great episode. But, for reals? There’s a question about who talks the most on the GLoP podcast? It’s slam-dunk JPod every time. I listened to the Conversations with Bill Kristol podcast recently. The poor guy sounded like he was about to hack up a lung. I imagined him saying to himself -“I’ve got to do a podcast, but this $*#@ cough means I can’t talk much – who can I get on who will do most of the talking?” JPod was the perfect pick. He very ably and interestingly carried the day.

    • #9
    • February 9, 2018 at 7:34 pm
    • 2 likes
  10. Member

    This was indeed a stellar airing of the Remnant podcast. I especially liked how JPod showed his pop cultural uber-hipness by explaining how movement conservatives “hedge their sails,” or “sail their trim,” or … or whatever he said, but it was very hip. Hipalooza. Hipaloozafest 2018.

    Taras (View Comment):
    Jonah: We both grew up in New York City in the 1970s, and while the city around us was becoming a bleak hellhole — I was mugged several times before I turned 12 —

    John: Four times for me.

    Since Jonah opened this podcast with the filibuster bait “are you a neocon, and how do you define neocon” question (I’m paraphrasing), I’d like
    a clear definition of the term “mugged.” When I hear the word, I always imagine a physical assault, but my armchair research leads me to believe that most people use the term as a synonym for “robbed.”

    • #10
    • February 11, 2018 at 11:47 am
    • 1 like
  11. Member

    Ricochet Audio Network: When Worlds Collide? More like When Mad, Mad, Mad Worlds Collide!

    You’re one Mad short in your allusion to THE ensemble film of all time (Sterling Holloway and Edward Everett Horton!). My favorite line: “How can anything go wrong with an old fashioned?”

    • #11
    • February 11, 2018 at 12:48 pm
    • Like
  12. Member

    The opening credits for Tenspeed And Brownshoe have convinced me to watch the pilot episode, but to not stray further than that – thanks for the warning.

    In terms of the most recent movie to attempt to portray a woman getting punched in a positive light, The Way Of The Gun (2000) begins with Sarah Silverman’s loudmouthed advocating-for-violence girlfriend character getting punched in the face by co-protagonist Ryan Phillippe (the other protagonist is played by Benicio Del Toro). I wouldn’t say that any character in that movie is one of the good guys, but the tone of the movie is that you’re supposed to side with/root for Phillippe and Del Toro. The movie immediately begins with horrible, against Ricochet code of conduct language, most of it spouted by Sarah Silverman, so I’ll only link to the opening clip here. It is not safe to watch at work or while children are around.

    • #12
    • February 11, 2018 at 1:02 pm
    • Like
  13. Thatcher

    Derringdoo (View Comment):
    Malcolm McDowell was in Caligula, not Roddy. Or so I’ve heard.

    I’m not saying this one casting change could redeem this film. But I’m not saying it couldn’t.

    Part of the Helen Mirren oeuvre, no?

    • #13
    • February 12, 2018 at 3:28 pm
    • Like
  14. Member

    It was like The Remnant and GLOP and The Substandard rolled into one! All my dreams are coming true.

    My two takeaways from The Poseidon Adventure (I am 44 years old and saw it for the first time about 15 years ago):

    1. Everybody, but especially Gene Hackman and Ernest Borgnine, yells all the time. For the entire movie. It makes the viewer long for them to drown.

    2. Shelley Winters just happens to be wearing her eighth grade swimming medal around her neck, as an adult 30+ years after the fact while she’s vacationing on a cruise ship far from home. As one does.

    • #14
    • February 12, 2018 at 7:47 pm
    • 2 likes
  15. Member

    LibertyDefender (View Comment):
    This was indeed a stellar airing of the Remnant podcast. I especially liked how JPod showed his pop cultural uber-hipness by explaining how movement conservatives “hedge their sails,” or “sail their trim,” or … or whatever he said, but it was very hip. Hipalooza. Hipaloozafest 2018.

    Taras (View Comment):
    Jonah: We both grew up in New York City in the 1970s, and while the city around us was becoming a bleak hellhole — I was mugged several times before I turned 12 —

    John: Four times for me.

    Since Jonah opened this podcast with the filibuster bait “are you a neocon, and how do you define neocon” question (I’m paraphrasing), I’d like
    a clear definition of the term “mugged.” When I hear the word, I always imagine a physical assault, but my armchair research leads me to believe that most people use the term as a synonym for “robbed.”

    Yeah, i wondered if that was exaggeration or not? Why would someone mug a kid? For what, his milk money?

    • #15
    • February 13, 2018 at 11:49 am
    • Like
  16. Coolidge

    kylez (View Comment):

    LibertyDefender (View Comment):
    This was indeed a stellar airing of the Remnant podcast. I especially liked how JPod showed his pop cultural uber-hipness by explaining how movement conservatives “hedge their sails,” or “sail their trim,” or … or whatever he said, but it was very hip. Hipalooza. Hipaloozafest 2018.

    Taras (View Comment):
    Jonah: We both grew up in New York City in the 1970s, and while the city around us was becoming a bleak hellhole — I was mugged several times before I turned 12 —

    John: Four times for me.

    Since Jonah opened this podcast with the filibuster bait “are you a neocon, and how do you define neocon” question (I’m paraphrasing), I’d like
    a clear definition of the term “mugged.” When I hear the word, I always imagine a physical assault, but my armchair research leads me to believe that most people use the term as a synonym for “robbed.”

    Yeah, i wondered if that was exaggeration or not? Why would someone mug a kid? For what, his milk money?

    This precisely makes my point – that people have forgotten, or never knew, what it was like in those days. New York City parents made sure that their kids had some money in their pockets whenever they went out. It was literally called “muggers’ money“. This was so that a mugger, enraged by lack of money, wouldn’t take it out on the child.

    • #16
    • February 13, 2018 at 11:00 pm
    • 2 likes
  17. Member

    LibertyDefender (View Comment): Since Jonah opened this podcast with the filibuster bait “are you a neocon, and how do you define neocon” question (I’m paraphrasing), I’d like a clear definition of the term “mugged.” When I hear the word, I always imagine a physical assault, but my armchair research leads me to believe that most people use the term as a synonym for “robbed.”

    kylez (View Comment): Yeah, i wondered if that was exaggeration or not? Why would someone mug a kid? For what, his milk money?

    Taras (View Comment): This precisely makes my point – that people have forgotten, or never knew, what it was like in those days. New York City parents made sure that their kids had some money in their pockets whenever they went out. It was literally called “muggers’ money“. This was so that a mugger, enraged by lack of money, wouldn’t take it out on the child.

    But this precisely avoids my question, Taras. What does it mean to be mugged? Does it mean meekly handing over milk money to the third grade bully because he leered at his victim? Does it mean theft plus beating?

    • #17
    • February 14, 2018 at 9:17 am
    • Like
  18. Coolidge

    LibertyDefender (View Comment):

    LibertyDefender (View Comment): Since Jonah opened this podcast with the filibuster bait “are you a neocon, and how do you define neocon” question (I’m paraphrasing), I’d like a clear definition of the term “mugged.” When I hear the word, I always imagine a physical assault, but my armchair research leads me to believe that most people use the term as a synonym for “robbed.”

    kylez (View Comment): Yeah, i wondered if that was exaggeration or not? Why would someone mug a kid? For what, his milk money?

    Taras (View Comment): This precisely makes my point – that people have forgotten, or never knew, what it was like in those days. New York City parents made sure that their kids had some money in their pockets whenever they went out. It was literally called “muggers’ money“. This was so that a mugger, enraged by lack of money, wouldn’t take it out on the child.

    But this precisely avoids my question, Taras. What does it mean to be mugged? Does it mean meekly handing over milk money to the third grade bully because he leered at his victim? Does it mean theft plus beating?

    Mugging is robbery in a public space by violence or the threat of violence or a mixture of both. It does not refer to the extortion activities of schoolyard bullies.

    Just as John and Jonathan assume that everybody remembers what New York City was like in the 70s, I assumed everybody knew what a mugging was!

    • #18
    • February 16, 2018 at 8:22 am
    • 1 like
  19. Member

    @jonahgoldberg missed something here too. The idea of gratitude leading to conservatism, because you want to preserve/conserve what exists, doesn’t take into account a point I’ve heard from others – don’t remember who – that liberals just say, “okay conservatives, we’ll change things to how we like it, and then you go ahead and ‘conserve’ what we give you.”

    “Make America Great Again” seems to recognize that just “conserving” whatever the situation is whenever the left happens to lose power for while, is insufficient. Roll-back is necessary. Otherwise, what do you do? Just “Conserve” things as Obama left them? Please.

    • #19
    • March 8, 2018 at 2:08 am
    • Like