Jonah invites Senator Ben Sasse (R-Corn) back to The Remnant for a wide-ranging conversation on the Republican Party, the state of our government, and…cats.

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There are 21 comments.

  1. Coolidge

    Glad to see Jonah talking with one of my favorite US Senators.

    • #1
    • September 13, 2018 at 3:27 pm
    • 3 likes
  2. Coolidge

     I was listening to the two guys talk and, stopping at 12:55, the thought hit me: “This is pretty sophomoric stuff!“

     I’m referring to the idea that the parties don’t stand for anything; that, as Jonah says, the reason people are Republicans is because they don’t want to be Democrats, and the reason people are Democrats is because they don’t want to be Republicans. 

     How about energy policy, for one: Republicans want to take advantage of the fossil fuel bonanza, while Democrats want to tax and regulate fossil fuels out of existence, and replace them with renewable energy, regardless of the cost. 

     Democrats want to complete the socialization of healthcare while Republicans, if not capable of rolling it back, at least don’t want to go any farther down that road. 

    Democrats want a Supreme Court that will bring the Constitution to heel, to make it a tool for social justice; Republicans want to preserve its power to restrict government. The Republican Party is the only thing that stands in the way of progressives gutting the Constitution.

     P.S.: I will listen to the rest of the podcast later. Perhaps it will improve. 

    • #2
    • September 13, 2018 at 4:11 pm
    • 3 likes
  3. Member

    You should ask Sen. Sasse about Glenn Reynolds’ revolving door tax.

    • #3
    • September 13, 2018 at 4:48 pm
    • Like
  4. Thatcher

    Taras (View Comment):
     I was listening to the two guys talk and, stopping at 12:55, the thought hit me: “This is pretty sophomoric stuff!“

    Not Jonah’s best podcast. A lot of um’s and ah’s from him. He has a man crush on Sasse. They should stick to private conversations.

    • #4
    • September 13, 2018 at 6:24 pm
    • Like
  5. Member

    FYI, I live not too far from the highest point in Iowa.

    • #5
    • September 13, 2018 at 6:30 pm
    • 1 like
  6. Thatcher

    Regarding Sasse’s comments on ethics reform, I don’t agree with him at all.

    On making Tax returns public: I believe in equal applicability of the law. Much was made of Trump’s refusal to release his tax returns. He was elected anyway. That’s the end of it. If I don’t have to release my tax returns, he shouldn’t either.

    On restricting the adult children of politicans on what they can do as adults (or any child based on what his/her parents do): If it’s not unconstitutional, it should be.

    Lobbying: I don’t care whether they are paid, or not paid, there should be no restrictions on the right to petition congress or its members.

    What Sasse proposes actually means more regulations, meaning more paperwork, that politicians will have to be mindful of. It will also make them more open to gotcha prosecutions when they don’t fill out one form or other or fail to follow more and more obscure regulations.

    Sasse mentions John McCain, whose name is on McCain-Feingold campaign finance legislation. All these campaign limits have done is make it harder for new politicians to put their hats in the ring, and make political officeholders spend more energy on fundraisers, and less on constituent service.

    Sasse talks about incentives and what makes politicians serve. The incentives that really count are the ones the voters give our politicians, and they want more government and not to pay for it. All the ethics rules in the world won’t change that.

    He’s proposing window dressing that will do more harm than good.

    • #6
    • September 13, 2018 at 6:58 pm
    • 7 likes
  7. Member

    Al Sparks (View Comment):
    On making Tax returns public: I believe in equal applicability of the law. Much was made of Trump’s refusal to release his tax returns. He was elected anyway. That’s the end of it. If I don’t have to release my tax returns, he shouldn’t either.

    This is what I thought about Obama’s transcripts. While I’d love to see the transcripts with the Indonesian address, I didn’t understand why candidates agreed to releasing their transcripts. They’re private. Why should voters get to see them?

    • #7
    • September 13, 2018 at 9:29 pm
    • 1 like
  8. Member

    Voters can ask for whatever they want, and base their final vote on what they actually get – or not – if they so choose. It’s rather stupid, but they CAN if they want to. It should not be a legal requirement, though.

    One risk to that, of course, is that we get even more Hillary-type wins because of goody-two-shoes Republicans who won’t vote for anyone who isn’t as wonderful as THEY are.

    • #8
    • September 13, 2018 at 9:47 pm
    • 2 likes
  9. Member

    I’ve encountered rebuttals to the “cats kill all the birds” hysteria which suggests that it’s promulgated by people with similar agendas to those who more recently claim that plastic drinking straws will be the end of humanity. Those people want domestic cats inside, if they must exist at all, and they don’t care what they have to make up and hope that people will believe, to accomplish their goal.

    • #9
    • September 14, 2018 at 12:59 am
    • 1 like
  10. Member

    If I heard right, Ben Sasse thinks there should be a variety of political parties, maybe 5 or more, sort of fighting over how to do the very few things government (at the federal level, at least) should be doing.

    But the very idea that there’s only a VERY FEW things government (at the federal level, at least) should be doing, is already one of the main dividing points of the existing parties.

    What is his goal, or ideal? Does he believe the current Democrat party (which doesn’t even believe that government should be limited at all) will disappear and then a variety of “Republican Parties” fight over whether the deficit should be $1 trillion or $2 trillion or $3 trillion or whatever?

    • #10
    • September 14, 2018 at 1:13 am
    • 1 like
  11. Coolidge

    Talking about congressional ethics is a distraction from the real problem that afflicts the United States: the entitlement crisis.

    We need to “cut” (reduce the growth rate of) Medicare, Social Security, Medicaid and Federal employee retirement pensions.

    It’s easier for Senator Sasse to talk about tax returns and lobbying because it won’t cost him any votes in Nebraska.

    If Sasse were to pull a Paul Ryan and propose entitlement reform, it could cause him significant political headaches. I have run into lots of Republican voters who would be willing to vote for a Democrat if a Republican member of Congress dared vote for “cutting” Social Security or Medicare.

    • #11
    • September 14, 2018 at 1:53 am
    • 4 likes
  12. Member

    Sasse might have great difficulty voting against ethanol programs/subsidies, too.

    • #12
    • September 14, 2018 at 4:15 am
    • Like
  13. Coolidge

    If that is as deep as these two guys can dig into policy, the are both true lightweights. The idea that tax returns should be public is a great idea, if you want to exclude non-politicians from public office. These guys *hate* Trump, but Trump single-handedly took charge of one of the major parties and found a new platform and a new coalition. Maybe Sasse should try to be a leader instead of a whiner.

    • #13
    • September 14, 2018 at 9:10 am
    • 1 like
  14. Coolidge

    DonG (View Comment):

    If that is as deep as these two guys can dig into policy, the are both true lightweights. The idea that tax returns should be public is a great idea, if you want to exclude non-politicians from public office. These guys *hate* Trump, but Trump single-handedly took charge of one of the major parties and found a new platform and a new coalition. Maybe Sasse should try to be a leader instead of a whiner.

     Any sensible person would see Trump refusing to release his tax returns was a masterstroke. Unless, that is, you don’t believe in liberal media bias! Whatever is in a Republican’s tax return will be attacked, even as a Democrat with the same things gets a free pass (or praise).

     If there is too much money, Trump would be attacked. If there is too little money, Trump would be attacked. In fact, he would be attacked for both things at the same time. Whatever is effective before a particular audience. 

    • #14
    • September 14, 2018 at 9:49 am
    • 1 like
  15. Coolidge

    Thanks Jonah and Ben. Great podcast as usual.

    • #15
    • September 14, 2018 at 9:50 am
    • 5 likes
  16. Coolidge

    kedavis (View Comment):

    If I heard right, Ben Sasse thinks there should be a variety of political parties, maybe 5 or more, sort of fighting over how to do the very few things government (at the federal level, at least) should be doing.

    But the very idea that there’s only a VERY FEW things government (at the federal level, at least) should be doing, is already one of the main dividing points of the existing parties.

    What is his goal, or ideal? Does he believe the current Democrat party (which doesn’t even believe that government should be limited at all) will disappear and then a variety of “Republican Parties” fight over whether the deficit should be $1 trillion or $2 trillion or $3 trillion or whatever?

     A lot of conservatives, including Jonah and Ben, are so used to having the media attacking the Republicans and promoting the Democrats that they take it as the natural course, and no longer think about the implications.

     If the general public has an equally negative view of both parties then, with the media dominance of the Left, that can only mean that the Democrats are worse than people think they are, while the Republicans are better than people think they are . 

    • #16
    • September 14, 2018 at 10:18 am
    • 1 like
  17. Thatcher

    kedavis (View Comment):
    Voters can ask for whatever they want, and base their final vote on what they actually get – or not – if they so choose. It’s rather stupid, but they CAN if they want to. It should not be a legal requirement, though.

    To make your point, politicians don’t answer questions all the time, whether by obfuscation or simply saying they won’t answer (they usually opt for obfuscation).

    This is no different.

    • #17
    • September 14, 2018 at 1:48 pm
    • 1 like
  18. Thatcher

    kedavis (View Comment):
    What is his goal, or ideal? Does he believe the current Democrat party (which doesn’t even believe that government should be limited at all) will disappear and then a variety of “Republican Parties” fight over whether the deficit should be $1 trillion or $2 trillion or $3 trillion or whatever?

    He thinks that changing the structure of governance will make government more efficient, and to some extent it will. He thinks that if only we had better people in government, that would solve a lot of problems. Not really. What we have in government does reflect the people who elect them.

    Other democracies have more efficient governance and it hasn’t stopped their administrative state from getting more powerful. One thing they have going for them is they’re smaller (at least I know of no western style democracy that has more population than the United States). He’s not addressing fundamental problems.

    Unless we restrict the ability of the federal government to tax (and therefore give room for the states to tax) we won’t return to true federalism.

    Before the New Deal, the average citizen paid more in taxes to their state and local governments than the federal government.

    Given how large we have become population wise, if the United States doesn’t go back to true federalism, than we’ll end up breaking up. Probably in about 50 years.

    • #18
    • September 14, 2018 at 2:02 pm
    • 2 likes
  19. Member

    P.S. The movie with Stallone as a bomb/explosives/demolition expert, was The Specialist. Also starring Sharon Stone.

    • #19
    • September 16, 2018 at 6:02 am
    • 1 like
  20. Member

    So was the alarming text that Sasse received at the end about Christine Blasey Ford de-anonymizing herself?

    • #20
    • September 17, 2018 at 2:07 am
    • 1 like
  21. Lincoln

    DonG (View Comment):

    If that is as deep as these two guys can dig into policy, the are both true lightweights. The idea that tax returns should be public is a great idea, if you want to exclude non-politicians from public office. These guys *hate* Trump, but Trump single-handedly took charge of one of the major parties and found a new platform and a new coalition. Maybe Sasse should try to be a leader instead of a whiner.

    Amen DonG. I’m getting a little tired of the Sen. Ben Sasse hates Washington and the political parties. We’ve heard this what 5 times now on the The Remnant alone and this is his big policy solution? The thing is I really want to like the Senator from Nebraska, but if this is the best he can come up with for a vision of the Republican party then maybe he’s just not much of an idea guy after all.

    • #21
    • September 17, 2018 at 5:17 am
    • 2 likes