In the thrilling conclusion to the epic two-parter with historian David Pietrusza, Jonah and David confront the legacy of Woodrow Wilson, and engage in some Wilson-bashing.

Shownotes

Subscribe to The Remnant with Jonah Goldberg in iTunes (and leave a 5-star review, please!), or by RSS feed. For all our podcasts in one place, subscribe to the Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed in iTunes or by RSS feed.

There are 7 comments.

  1. Kim K. Member

    This guest was very interesting, however, I had the feeling Jonah was frustrated at times by the guest’s habit of stepping on his set-ups.

    • #1
    • July 20, 2019, at 8:12 PM PDT
    • 2 likes
  2. Icarus213 Thatcher

    Kim K. (View Comment):

    This guest was very interesting, however, I had the feeling Jonah was frustrated at times by the guest’s habit of stepping on his set-ups.

    This was exactly my thought, and he was always cutting in to basically say “and here’s another thing from history that I know!” Jonah seemed to have to always be bringing them back on topic.

    • #2
    • July 21, 2019, at 2:04 PM PDT
    • 1 like
  3. colleenb Member

    Loved the interviews with Pietrusza (listened to them both). I’ll give Jonah a little leeway @icarus213 and @kimk – I think he’s just excited about history and this period so he had to get in his ideas too. And yeah I dislike Wilson too although his home in Staunton is a fascinating tour.

    • #3
    • July 22, 2019, at 9:48 AM PDT
    • Like
  4. Jeff Hawkins Coolidge

    Loved Pietrusza

    also since I was critical of the sound effects, I shall praise @jackbutler for the open

    • #4
    • July 22, 2019, at 10:40 AM PDT
    • 1 like
  5. Full Size Tabby Member

    Excellent opening @jackbutler .

    • #5
    • July 22, 2019, at 11:31 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  6. JackButler Podcaster

    Jeff Hawkins (View Comment):

    Loved Pietrusza

    also since I was critical of the sound effects, I shall praise @jackbutler for the open

    Thanks. 

    • #6
    • July 24, 2019, at 6:59 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  7. Richard Fulmer Member

    After these podcasts, I started reading Pietrusza’s book, 1920: The Year of the Six Presidents. I’m only 44 pages in, but so far, I’ve been informed that:

    1. The 16th Amendment established popular elections for senators. It was the 17th.
    2. Woodrow Wilson was initially conservative. I assume that Pietrusza read only Wilson’s gubernatorial and presidential campaign speeches and not his earlier writings. Wilson, the campaigner, said what he needed to get elected. See Woodrow Wilson and the Roots of Modern Liberalism.
    3. Wilson addressed “striking steel miners” in Pueblo during his cross-country speaking campaign to win support for the League of Nations. One wonders why the brass and pewter miners missed the speech.

    Who the heck did this guy’s fact-checking? PolitiFact?

    • #7
    • August 18, 2019, at 7:53 AM PDT
    • 1 like