Jonah is joined by The Dispatch reporter Declan Garvey to discuss his trip to President Trump’s rally in Hershey, Pennsylvania, reporting on Capitol Hill, the state of the Democratic primary, and their mutual love of The Mandalorian.

Show Notes

The Dispatch

Declan Garvey

Battleground state polls

ZipRecruiter.com/dingo

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There are 4 comments.

  1. TerryS Member

    I wouldn’t call deceiving the FISA court by omitting exculpatory evidence, forging a document, and misstating facts “failing to dot every i and cross every t,” but then, I am not a Harvard graduate.

    • #1
    • December 12, 2019, at 5:30 PM PST
    • 10 likes
  2. WilliamDean Coolidge

    One of my earliest memories, I must have been 3 or 4, was seeing Star Wars on its original release one night in the family car at the local drive-in in my hometown.

     

    • #2
    • December 12, 2019, at 11:59 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  3. ericB Listener

    Even if an episode of the Mandalorian is to some degree inspired by the western The Magnificent Seven, it should not be forgotten that The Magnificent Seven itself was as much or more a retelling as a western of Akira Kurosawa’s 1954 film classic Seven Samurai.

    James Coburn, one of the main actors on the 1960 The Magnificent Seven, was such a fan of Seven Samurai that he had seen it 15 times — back in the time before 1960, before streaming services or even video rentals.

    Seven Samurai is currently at number 20 on the highest rated movies at IMDB.

    Meanwhile, Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope (1977) is “down” at number 26 on that list. I still remember what a stunning moment it was to be in the theater to see the opening fly over of the mind-stretching, immense star cruiser, something that was commonly noted in conversation at the time.

    Within even just the early minutes of the movie, it was evident that this movie was taking us across a boundary into a new era of film with special effects that were qualitatively in a different category than before. An earlier comparable moment may have been when Dorothy steps out of her home into Oz, and the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz shifts from shades of black and white to brilliant color.

    • #3
    • December 15, 2019, at 12:43 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  4. ericB Listener

    ericB (View Comment):
    it should not be forgotten that The Magnificent Seven itself was as much or more a retelling as a western of Akira Kurosawa’s 1954 film classic Seven Samurai.

    p.s. I haven’t seen the Mandalorian (and have no plan to subscribe to the Disney service), but as I understand it, their use of weapons is an integral part of the codes of their Mandalorian religion.

    Instead of comparing them to an ad hoc rag tag gang of old west gun slingers, I wonder if it would be much more fitting to compare them to the Samurai with their devotion to the bushido codes that dictated the samurai way of life.

    • #4
    • December 15, 2019, at 2:34 PM PST
    • Like