There are 9 comments.

Become a member to join the conversation. Or sign in if you're already a member.
  1. TerryS Member

    A good podcast, with Jonah expanding on themes he wrote about in _Suicide of the West_. But Jonah does not seem to understand that the set of rules that we make to govern the interactions between people who are not related by kinship (however defined) work to destroy the relationships forged by kinship. To capitalism, the special relationship you have with family members is an inefficiency that the market should eliminate. There is no rational reason why you should spend $20k/ year educating your idiot son or daughter, just because you happen to love them.

    The market cannot love you.

     

    • #1
    • April 4, 2020, at 7:57 PM PDT
    • 2 likes
  2. rev1917 Lincoln

    TerryS (View Comment):

    A good podcast, with Jonah expanding on themes he wrote about in _Suicide of the West_. But Jonah does not seem to understand that the set of rules that we make to govern the interactions between people who are not related by kinship (however defined) work to destroy the relationships forged by kinship. To capitalism, the special relationship you have with family members is an inefficiency that the market should eliminate. There is no rational reason why you should spend $20k/ year educating your idiot son or daughter, just because you happen to love them.

    The market cannot love you.

     

    A though experiment: If everyone paid for their own higher education, would it become more of a meritocracy and would demand for RoI eliminate the over administration that exists today?

    • #2
    • April 5, 2020, at 5:10 AM PDT
    • Like
  3. TerryS Member

    rev1917 (View Comment):

    TerryS (View Comment):

    A good podcast, with Jonah expanding on themes he wrote about in _Suicide of the West_. But Jonah does not seem to understand that the set of rules that we make to govern the interactions between people who are not related by kinship (however defined) work to destroy the relationships forged by kinship. To capitalism, the special relationship you have with family members is an inefficiency that the market should eliminate. There is no rational reason why you should spend $20k/ year educating your idiot son or daughter, just because you happen to love them.

    The market cannot love you.

     

    A though experiment: If everyone paid for their own higher education, would it become more of a meritocracy and would demand for RoI eliminate the over administration that exists today?

    Not many 18 year olds can pay for their own higher education.

    • #3
    • April 5, 2020, at 7:42 AM PDT
    • Like
  4. JuliaBlaschke Coolidge

    Very much enjoyed this podcast. Looking forward to the dog book although I would prefer you write it without Mr. Sunstein. Just before this nightmare began, we brought 2 puppies into our lives and are so glad we did. They have brought such joy at a trying time. So please, go ahead with more dog podcasts.

    • #4
    • April 5, 2020, at 12:55 PM PDT
    • Like
  5. kedavis Inactive

    TerryS (View Comment):

    A good podcast, with Jonah expanding on themes he wrote about in _Suicide of the West_. But Jonah does not seem to understand that the set of rules that we make to govern the interactions between people who are not related by kinship (however defined) work to destroy the relationships forged by kinship. To capitalism, the special relationship you have with family members is an inefficiency that the market should eliminate. There is no rational reason why you should spend $20k/ year educating your idiot son or daughter, just because you happen to love them.

    The market cannot love you.

    If the market doesn’t recognize the need to produce more people to keep the market going, then the market is pretty dumb.

    • #5
    • April 5, 2020, at 4:47 PM PDT
    • Like
  6. rev1917 Lincoln

    TerryS (View Comment):

    rev1917 (View Comment):

    TerryS (View Comment):

    A good podcast, with Jonah expanding on themes he wrote about in _Suicide of the West_. But Jonah does not seem to understand that the set of rules that we make to govern the interactions between people who are not related by kinship (however defined) work to destroy the relationships forged by kinship. To capitalism, the special relationship you have with family members is an inefficiency that the market should eliminate. There is no rational reason why you should spend $20k/ year educating your idiot son or daughter, just because you happen to love them.

    The market cannot love you.

     

    A though experiment: If everyone paid for their own higher education, would it become more of a meritocracy and would demand for RoI eliminate the over administration that exists today?

    Not many 18 year olds can pay for their own higher education.

    Expand grants and scholarships while enabling part-time work. Student loans would still be available, although they seem a distorting element at the moment.

    • #6
    • April 6, 2020, at 4:50 AM PDT
    • Like
  7. TerryS Member

    “If the market doesn’t recognize the need to produce more people to keep the market going, then the market is pretty dumb.”

    The market is not a person, so it is neither smart nor dumb. The market is a set of incentives that prioritize economic efficiency over human relationships.

    • #7
    • April 6, 2020, at 4:28 PM PDT
    • Like
  8. kedavis Inactive

    TerryS (View Comment):

    “If the market doesn’t recognize the need to produce more people to keep the market going, then the market is pretty dumb.”

    The market is not a person, so it is neither smart nor dumb. The market is a set of incentives that prioritize economic efficiency over human relationships.

    My point too. If the market prioritizes economics to the point that people have no incentive to make more people, then the market is really no different from a parasite that kills the host, and hence itself.

    • #8
    • April 6, 2020, at 5:30 PM PDT
    • Like
  9. Titus Techera Contributor

    The market doesn’t make sense of certain things we ourselves have problems dealing with well. This is because the market presupposes more stability in human purposes than there is. If you base the market in the kinds of moral beliefs widespread until recently–America is based on families, mothers will sacrifice for their children, men will provide for their families–it works fairly well, since people, as producers & consumers, buyers & sellers, capitalists & laborers, can pursue those purposes.

    But there are popular temptations & elite temptations to change those purposes. Americans today do not live as they did in 1946. But there are many other people in many other countries who have lived even more different lives. Human beings are strangely malleable, strangely imitative, & strangely fickle. During the baby boom, it seemed in America living & making a living were going to work together splendidly! But since, it’s become more & more doubtful. Nowadays, in America, you can have a life, or make a living, but it’s tricky to do both. Perhaps, now it’s a crisis, since it’s proved impossible to persuade adults to get & stay married–a bare majority still does it, but marriage really now seems to be the minority opinion. This was supposedly the basis of family, itself the basis of society.

    But society is just one side of this problem, politics is another, entertainment/culture/education another. It’s become difficult to find any aspect of America that’s not in or approaching crisis…

    • #9
    • April 7, 2020, at 4:23 AM PDT
    • Like