Jonah invites Jay Cost, AEI Visiting Fellow and author of The Price of Greatness, onto The Remnant for a very nerdy discussion of republicanism, the Founding, and the state of our government.

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There are 33 comments.

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  1. Thatcher

    I enjoyed the whole show.

    It was amusing listening to Jonah and Jay Cost talking about Trump. I’m one of the Trump skeptics who is pretty happy with my vote for him.

    I will say this, though, about their complaints about his tone. I listened to George W. Bush talk about his attempt to bring a new tone to Washington and all I saw was a president who turned the other cheek. What I didn’t see was someone who would stand up to the partisan Democrats.

    After 8 years of Bush — who yes is an honorable man, a much better man than Trump — talking about his new tone, I say bah on that.

    I think that Trump’s tone, while juvenile and distasteful in many ways, is bringing out a lot of poison. After listening for most of my adult life from liberal progressives about how compassionate they are and how mean spirited conservatives are, their true colors are being revealed for everyone to see.

    There is a lot of value in that.

    • #1
    • July 10, 2018 at 8:04 pm
    • 6 likes
  2. Member

    I think tone is something people on the right should agree to disagree with each other about.

    • #2
    • July 10, 2018 at 9:32 pm
    • 2 likes
  3. Member

    I heard something on one of the Sunday shows a couple weeks ago, that I think could easily apply to @jonahgoldberg if enough people had agreed with him and Hillary had won:

    “How is that not-voting working out for you?”

    • #3
    • July 11, 2018 at 7:32 am
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  4. Coolidge

    Al Sparks (View Comment):
    There is a lot of value in that.

    There is also a great cost. Especially in foreign relations and trade.

    • #4
    • July 11, 2018 at 8:15 am
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  5. Coolidge

    kedavis (View Comment):
    “How is that not-voting working out for you?”

    Better than looking at Trump and saying “I voted for that?” 

    • #5
    • July 11, 2018 at 8:16 am
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  6. Coolidge

    One of the old Catholic military orders still exists, the Hospitallers, aka the Knights of Malta. Their military wing was deactivated a long time ago, but they still do a lot of charity work. It turns out they are taking over the supreme court.

    https://www.thedailybeast.com/the-secrets-of-leonard-leo-the-man-behind-trumps-supreme-court-pick

    • #6
    • July 11, 2018 at 9:05 am
    • Like
  7. Coolidge

    Al Sparks (View Comment):
    I think that Trump’s tone, while juvenile and distasteful in many ways, is bringing out a lot of poison. After listening for most of my adult life from liberal progressives about how compassionate they are and how mean spirited conservatives are, their true colors are being revealed for everyone to see.

    It has always been revealed. They went after Romney for the most ridiculous things. Trump only fights when he perceives an insult to himself. He couldn’t care less about liberals or conservatives or Democrats or Republicans. If the media started praising Trump, he would love the media. So far this has worked out well, but I don’t believe his instincts are always what is good for America. What’s good for Trump will always come first and there may well come a day when those two roads diverge. 

    • #7
    • July 11, 2018 at 10:32 am
    • 1 like
  8. Thatcher

    Good podcast. Reference the A/C thing – my Dad (an Atlanta native) used to say that Atlanta would still be a moderately sized Southern City if not for the SOB that invented air conditioning. Here is a similar idea to the A/C idea…make it illegal for any member of the Congress to own any real estate within 60 miles of DC, unless their district adjoined the District, limit a session of Congress to X days a year (I have heard 180 days…by August Congressional business best be done because if not it would have to wait until next year), Require Congress to actually reside in their district and not in a Post Office box, either…The basic idea is to force Congress Critters back to their areas of representation so they would actually know what their voters thought…

    But the No A/C idea might actually be doable…:)

    • #8
    • July 11, 2018 at 11:29 am
    • 2 likes
  9. Coolidge

    Barry Jones (View Comment):
    But the No A/C idea might actually be doable…:)

    Trump would move the White House to Mar O Lago for his entire term. 

    • #9
    • July 11, 2018 at 12:01 pm
    • Like
  10. Coolidge

    JuliaBlaschke (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):
    “How is that not-voting working out for you?”

    Better than looking at Trump and saying “I voted for that?”

    I think Jonah Goldberg lives in Washington DC. The District was not competitive. There, it’s safe to vote for anyone, or not vote, to make a statement. If Goldberg lived in Wisconsin, it would be a different story.

    • #10
    • July 11, 2018 at 1:01 pm
    • 1 like
  11. Coolidge

    Barry Jones (View Comment):

    Good podcast. Reference the A/C thing – my Dad (an Atlanta native) used to say that Atlanta would still be a moderately sized Southern City if not for the SOB that invented air conditioning. Here is a similar idea to the A/C idea…make it illegal for any member of the Congress to own any real estate within 60 miles of DC, unless their district adjoined the District, limit a session of Congress to X days a year (I have heard 180 days…by August Congressional business best be done because if not it would have to wait until next year), Require Congress to actually reside in their district and not in a Post Office box, either…The basic idea is to force Congress Critters back to their areas of representation so they would actually know what their voters thought…

    But the No A/C idea might actually be doable…:)

    With modern transportation, I think that Congresscritters spend more time in their districts than in the old days. Many go home every weekend, and the weekends are usually long weekends. With two year terms, many never stop campaigning. This has the negative effect of the critters having very limited time to socialize among themselves. They don’t get to know each other as well as in the old days. While the lack of earmarks make it harder to make deals, it’s also hard to make deals with strangers.

    • #11
    • July 11, 2018 at 1:07 pm
    • Like
  12. Thatcher

    JuliaBlaschke (View Comment):

    Al Sparks (View Comment):
    There is a lot of value in that.

    There is also a great cost. Especially in foreign relations and trade.

    I actually don’t think so. I think the leaders of those countries are factoring his personality in, and there will be no long term consequences over their contempt for him. The only real policy I’m concerned about is his prediliction towards trade wars.

    His foreign policies are mostly mainstream. Even his noise about NATO is just that, mostly smoke and mirrors, as is his “detente” with North Korea, where we didn’t accomplish anything but we didn’t give up anything either. And those trade wars? That could be bad if he actually does what he says he will. But will he? He did hire Larry Kudlow who’s a free trader advocate. And the biggest thing Trump has going for him is the good economy. Will he risk that?

    And I doubt that the actual voters of Western Europe are all that concerned about him, as they’ve had their own populist movemments lately. And many of the non-democracies have dictators with the same crude personality he has. Who cares what they think of us, as long as they fear us?

    • #12
    • July 11, 2018 at 1:21 pm
    • 1 like
  13. Thatcher

    FredGoodhue (View Comment):

    JuliaBlaschke (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):
    “How is that not-voting working out for you?”

    Better than looking at Trump and saying “I voted for that?”

    I think Jonah Goldberg lives in Washington DC. The District was not competitive. There, it’s safe to vote for anyone, or not vote, to make a statement. If Goldberg lived in Wisconsin, it would be a different story.

    If memory serves, he did say that he factored that in.

    • #13
    • July 11, 2018 at 1:22 pm
    • 2 likes
  14. Coolidge

    kedavis (View Comment):

    I heard something on one of the Sunday shows a couple weeks ago, that I think could easily apply to @jonahgoldberg if enough people had agreed with him and Hillary had won:

    “How is that not-voting working out for you?”

    Never Trump is over.

    But, if repeat ourselves we must, see Ep. 37: Effulgent Punditry, remarks 10 and 19.

    • #14
    • July 11, 2018 at 1:28 pm
    • Like
  15. Thatcher

    JuliaBlaschke (View Comment):
    It has always been revealed. They went after Romney for the most ridiculous things.

    We know that. Independent voters don’t know that. It wasn’t revealed to them. On the other hand, Maxine Waters made the news big time over her remarks, and so did the Red Hen restaurant with Sarah Huckabee Sanders.

    And so much isn’t getting “revealed”. It’s not well known that the FCC chairman Ajit Pai has had his home demonstrated against very aggressively over net neutrality, not really the biggest issue in the country for most people. He’s raising small kids. And there have been credible death threats (twitter doesn’t count).

    Just because we know about it, doesn’t mean everyone knows about it.

    • #15
    • July 11, 2018 at 1:37 pm
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  16. Coolidge

    Al Sparks (View Comment):
    Who cares what they think of us, as long as they fear us?

    I think they are more likely laughing at us.

    • #16
    • July 11, 2018 at 2:49 pm
    • 1 like
  17. Coolidge

    “‘Everything went to hell in a handbasket when they repealed the seventeenth amendment'”—passed the seventeenth amendment! I am as pleased as I am surprised to hear anyone raising this extremely important but extremely boring and therefore seldom discussed topic (passing the seventeenth amendment—popular election of senators—arguably largely destroyed vertical separation of powers, an important element of the American constitutional structure and guarantor of liberty), but I also can’t resist pointing out Mr. Cost’s error; he means “passed”, not “repealed”. (Freudian slip, perhaps—we all wish it might be repealed someday. God grant it!)

    • #17
    • July 11, 2018 at 3:43 pm
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  18. Member

    JuliaBlaschke (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):
    “How is that not-voting working out for you?”

    Better than looking at Trump and saying “I voted for that?”

    Sorry, but the path and fate of the country – and even the world, really – is more important than Jonah’s feelings and virtue signaling etc. And more important than yours too, if that’s necessary.

    • #18
    • July 11, 2018 at 6:07 pm
    • 1 like
  19. Member

    Al Sparks (View Comment):

    FredGoodhue (View Comment):

    JuliaBlaschke (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):
    “How is that not-voting working out for you?”

    Better than looking at Trump and saying “I voted for that?”

    I think Jonah Goldberg lives in Washington DC. The District was not competitive. There, it’s safe to vote for anyone, or not vote, to make a statement. If Goldberg lived in Wisconsin, it would be a different story.

    If memory serves, he did say that he factored that in.

    That may be, but the way Jonah and others present it, they appear to be arguing that it was and is a valid position for anyone, anywhere. It really isn’t. Some people talk about how just a few thousand votes in a few states would have flipped the election. The same would have happened with a few thousand non-votes. Jonah appears to prefer an aire of superiority and not getting his hands dirty, and letting other people do what has to be done even to basically save Jonah from himself.

    I could move to DC and vote for Trotsky every year and claim some kind of purity since my vote doesn’t really count anyway. But what would be the real value in that? Especially if I had podcasts and magazine articles etc reaching people for whom voting for Trotsky could DEFINITELY make a difference – a BAD difference?

     

    • #19
    • July 11, 2018 at 6:15 pm
    • Like
  20. Member

    Also, if enough non-voters had turned out for Trump even in states where he wasn’t electorally viable, the “he lost the popular vote” argument could have been removed.

    • #20
    • July 11, 2018 at 6:15 pm
    • Like
  21. Member

    And if Jonah’s vote doesn’t count, then his not-voting doesn’t really count either. Not even as a “statement.” Except perhaps a statement of shortsightedness and foolishness.

    • #21
    • July 11, 2018 at 6:33 pm
    • 1 like
  22. Member

    That was outstanding. 

    • #22
    • July 12, 2018 at 8:29 am
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  23. Member

    Somebody let Jonah know they tried to off his buddy, but he seems to have weathered the storm (with a little help)…. ;)

    • #23
    • July 12, 2018 at 9:06 am
    • 1 like
  24. Coolidge

    Right, right? Like right, right? Right, right? Right. Like, right. Right, right. Does every Remnant podcast have to deteriorate into catharsis for Jonah by venting all his frustrations and saying the same things over and over? Turn the page, man.

    • #24
    • July 13, 2018 at 10:26 am
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  25. Thatcher

    rdowhower (View Comment):

    Right, right? Like right, right? Right, right? Right. Like, right. Right, right. Does every Remnant podcast have to deteriorate into catharsis for Jonah by venting all his frustrations and saying the same things over and over? Turn the page, man.

    So he has some tics. Almost every personality has tics. I listen to John Batchelor’s podcasts quite a bit. He has “smartest man in the room”itis. They’re either endearing or their not.

    I stopped listening to Jay Nordingler because of his tics.

    Very few people are tic free. Maybe Brian Lamb of C-SPAN is.

    • #25
    • July 15, 2018 at 1:24 am
    • 3 likes
  26. Coolidge

    kedavis (View Comment):

    JuliaBlaschke (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):
    “How is that not-voting working out for you?”

    Better than looking at Trump and saying “I voted for that?”

    Sorry, but the path and fate of the country – and even the world, really – is more important than Jonah’s feelings and virtue signaling etc. And more important than yours too, if that’s necessary.

    Sorry but Trump has neither the character or experience necessary and that was once again, horribly, on display in Helsinki. I am very happy I did not vote for this selfish, utterly contemptible fool and that is not virtue signaling. That is a fact. Your position can just as easily be described as virtue signaling. Trump is so self obsessed that he only represents himself and his completely stupid opinions in talks with Putin. All he cares about is Mueller’s investigation and how it affects him personally. He is not representing the US in the talks. He is representing himself – as usual. I hope that getting rid of a few easily reinstalled regulations, a tax cut and the judges is worth the damage that this fool is fully capable of inflicting on trade and international relations. I really do.

    • #26
    • July 16, 2018 at 12:54 pm
    • Like
  27. Member

    JuliaBlaschke (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

     

    Sorry, but the path and fate of the country – and even the world, really – is more important than Jonah’s feelings and virtue signaling etc. And more important than yours too, if that’s necessary.

    Sorry but Trump has neither the character or experience necessary and that was once again, horribly, on display in Helsinki. I am very happy I did not vote for this selfish, utterly contemptible fool and that is not virtue signaling. That is a fact. Your position can just as easily be described as virtue signaling. Trump is so self obsessed that he only represents himself and his completely stupid opinions in talks with Putin. All he cares about is Mueller’s investigation and how it affects him personally. He is not representing the US in the talks. He is representing himself – as usual. I hope that getting rid of a few easily reinstalled regulations, a tax cut and the judges is worth the damage that this fool is fully capable of inflicting on trade and international relations. I really do.

    Then ultimately, what you’re saying is that you’d be happier with Hillary. Because that was the other option. You weren’t going to get Ted Cruz by not voting for Trump. (I actually voted for Cruz in the primaries.) And you didn’t have to vote FOR Hillary to GET Hillary. All that had to happen was enough people – like you and @jonahgoldberg – NOT voting for Trump.

     

    • #27
    • July 16, 2018 at 4:13 pm
    • Like
  28. Thatcher

    JuliaBlaschke (View Comment):
    Sorry but Trump has neither the character or experience necessary and that was once again, horribly, on display in Helsinki. I am very happy I did not vote for this selfish, utterly contemptible fool and that is not virtue signaling. That is a fact.

    Strictly speaking, there’s a lot of opinion (i.e. “selfish, utterly contemptible” blah blah, “virtue signalling” blah blah), with the only fact being that you didn’t vote for him.

    As you can see from my previous postings, I’m not a fan of Trump the person, but still.

    • #28
    • July 16, 2018 at 9:11 pm
    • Like
  29. Member

    Al Sparks (View Comment):

    JuliaBlaschke (View Comment):
    Sorry but Trump has neither the character or experience necessary and that was once again, horribly, on display in Helsinki. I am very happy I did not vote for this selfish, utterly contemptible fool and that is not virtue signaling. That is a fact.

    Strictly speaking, there’s a lot of opinion (i.e. “selfish, utterly contemptible” blah blah, “virtue signalling” blah blah), with the only fact being that you didn’t vote for him.

    As you can see from my previous postings, I’m not a fan of Trump the person, but still.

    Ditto. And as indicated previously, I voted for Cruz in the primary. But I wasn’t going to put my own taste or distaste or whatever, above either national or GLOBAL interest and either vote outright for Hillary or default vote for Hillary by not voting at all. Whether they see it themselves or not, whether they can admit it to themselves or not, people who didn’t vote were actually saying they would have been happier with Hillary. Because that was the effect, and would have been the result if enough people had failed to put their personal issues aside and done the same.

    Overall, the best response to people like @jonahgoldberg who just couldn’t lower themselves to vote for Trump, the poor dears, when they express approval about a supreme court nomination or whatever, still seems to be “No thanks to YOU!”

    • #29
    • July 17, 2018 at 1:33 am
    • Like
  30. Member

    Trump lacks civic executive experience. It’s a completely different type of pressure. Then you take his lack of civic and government knowledge, he’s going to make mistakes. It’s just how bad they are. So far so good.

    The GOP was never going to do anything about the centralization, the Keynesianism, and the cultural Marxism that people are sick of. They want their cut or they want fixed. The GOP ruling class had no idea how to handle a 17 candidate primary. So we got Trump. Then throw in the fact that Bernie got screwed out of the nomination.

    Ted Cruz could’ve let us out of this crap, but he didn’t get nominated.

    • #30
    • July 20, 2018 at 6:08 am
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