As Jay says at the outset, Kevin D. Williamson is one of his favorite writers and favorite people. In this hour, they explore a range of subjects either timely or timeless (and in some cases both). They talk about Kevin’s upbringing in West Texas. And about controversies he’s been involved in. (“White genocide”?) And about Trump, and economics, and immigration. They end on such topics as writers and composers. All in all, they explore the Williamsonian point of view, or the Williamsonian persuasion. Meet a man and a mind.

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There are 19 comments.

  1. Karl Nittinger Inactive

    I normally plan my podcast episode catch-ups around my evening run (or, more accurately, run/intermittent brisk walk). But this new one just bumped straight to the top of the list. Thank you Jay Nordlinger and Ricochet!!

    • #1
    • September 11, 2017, at 10:05 AM PST
    • 4 likes
  2. George Townsend Inactive

    Karl Nittinger (View Comment):
    I normally plan my podcast episode catch-ups around my evening run (or, more accurately, run/intermittent brisk walk). But this new one just bumped straight to the top of the list. Thank you Jay Nordlinger and Ricochet!!

    I agree absolutely. Williamson is a very learned man, and it was a pleasure listening. Thank you, Jay!

    • #2
    • September 11, 2017, at 11:33 AM PST
    • 3 likes
  3. Henry Castaigne Member

    George Townsend (View Comment):

    I agree absolutely. Williamson is a very learned man, and it was a pleasure listening. Thank you, Jay!

    I agree but I wish he would engage in Ricochet more. Some of the Dirka Dirka-freedom-gun-Jesus stuff is quite stimulating and Ricochet separates the wheat from the chaff.

    I wish everyone in America could hear what Williamson has to say at 46 minutes in. The welfare state is about pork and special interests and it isn’t about poor folks.

    • #3
    • September 11, 2017, at 2:01 PM PST
    • 1 like
  4. JuliaBlaschke Coolidge

    Now that I know Mr. Williamson is a Texan I like him even better. I would like to hear him debate Victor Davis Hanson who climbed aboard the Trump Train.

    • #4
    • September 11, 2017, at 2:15 PM PST
    • 5 likes
  5. Taras Coolidge

    I think Mr. Williamson (whom I admire greatly and always read first in every issue of National Review) is being a bit disingenuous when he claims not to know what it means to call somebody a “globalist”.

    The idea that we are all equally patriotic is, of course, absurd. To conservatives, America is the “shining city on a hill”. To progressives, America is kind of Nazi Germany. (N.B.: So is Israel.)

    A globalist, then, would be someone who does not particularly like the United States, and sees no problem in sacrificing its interests on behalf of the needs of the global community.

    There’s a reason why certain Presidents are very popular overseas — and others are not!

    • #5
    • September 11, 2017, at 2:53 PM PST
    • 4 likes
  6. George Townsend Inactive

    Henry Castaigne (View Comment):
    I wish everyone in America could hear what Williamson has to say at 46 minutes in. The welfare state is about pork and special interests and it isn’t about poor folks.

    Truer words were never spoken. I think I became a conservative when I realized that giving money to folk isn’t helping them at all!

    • #6
    • September 11, 2017, at 2:55 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  7. Henry Castaigne Member

    George Townsend (View Comment):
    Truer words were never spoken. I think I became a conservative when I realized that giving money to folk isn’t helping them at all!

    The plight of inner-city blacks and Native Americans seem to bolster that.

    • #7
    • September 11, 2017, at 3:22 PM PST
    • 1 like
  8. filmklassik Member

    Taras (View Comment):
    I think Mr. Williamson (whom I admire greatly and always read first in every issue of National Review) is being a bit disingenuous when he claims not to know what it means to call somebody a “globalist”.

    The idea that we are all equally patriotic is, of course, absurd. To conservatives, America is the “shining city on a hill”. To progressives, America is kind of Nazi Germany. (N.B.: So is Israel.)

    A globalist, then, would be someone who does not particularly like the United States, and sees no problem in sacrificing its interests on behalf of the needs of the global community.

    There’s a reason why certain Presidents are very popular overseas — and others are not!

    Agree with this 100 percent. Interesting how it is possible to be on board with thinking like this while at the same time despising Trump and his staunch following, as I do.

    We’re a lonely bunch.

    • #8
    • September 11, 2017, at 9:21 PM PST
    • Like
  9. filmklassik Member

    Great podcast, as always.

    • #9
    • September 11, 2017, at 9:27 PM PST
    • 1 like
  10. Karl Nittinger Inactive

    Taras (View Comment):
    I think Mr. Williamson (whom I admire greatly and always read first in every issue of National Review) is being a bit disingenuous when he claims not to know what it means to call somebody a “globalist”.

    The idea that we are all equally patriotic is, of course, absurd. To conservatives, America is the “shining city on a hill”. To progressives, America is kind of Nazi Germany. (N.B.: So is Israel.)

    A globalist, then, would be someone who does not particularly like the United States, and sees no problem in sacrificing its interests on behalf of the needs of the global community.

    There’s a reason why certain Presidents are very popular overseas — and others are not!

    At various times, I’ve seen Ben Sasse, Paul Ryan, HR McMaster, Mitch McConnell, John McCain, and many others referred to as “globalists”. Do you think that these people do, “not particularly like the United States” and see, “no problem in sacrificing its interests on behalf of the needs of the global community”? This is the reason why Kevin Williamson said he doesn’t know what the term means. It’s because it has no meaning. It is used as an epithet applied to whoever may act in any way which might be remotely construed as contrary to the current president. It is a childish and meaningless term.

    • #10
    • September 12, 2017, at 7:43 AM PST
    • 4 likes
  11. James Golden Inactive

    Jay and Kevin:

    I want to say something snarky, but can’t think of anything good. So I will just say well done! One of the best podcasts I’ve listened to in quite some time. I could listen to the two of you forever. I suppose that is my critique of the podcast — it was too short!

    • #11
    • September 12, 2017, at 8:27 AM PST
    • 4 likes
  12. Frozen Chosen Inactive

    So I use the Downcast app for my podcasts and I can’t seem to find this one to subscribe. Does anyone know how I can add this podcast via Downcast?

    • #12
    • September 12, 2017, at 9:26 AM PST
    • Like
  13. Blue Yeti Admin

    Frozen Chosen (View Comment):
    So I use the Downcast app for my podcasts and I can’t seem to find this one to subscribe. Does anyone know how I can add this podcast via Downcast?

    @frozenchosen It’s there. Try searching for “Nordlinger”:

    Alternatively, you can subscribe to the Ricochet SuperFeed (also available in DownCast) and get all of our shows in one place.

    • #13
    • September 12, 2017, at 1:38 PM PST
    • 1 like
  14. scottmorales Inactive

    FWIW: I think I remember a possible origin of the quote Kevin was looking for: “Trump is like a poor man’s version of what a rich man’s life is like” (around 18:15). If I remember correctly, something very close to that came from Jonah Goldberg during the recording of GLoP when Kevin sat in for John Podhoretz (the GloW version of GLoP), I think around July 2015, maybe. It’s a great one if you’re into that sort of thing. Anyway, that might be where he first heard it.

    Scott

    • #14
    • September 12, 2017, at 5:49 PM PST
    • Like
  15. David Guaspari Member

    About ad hominem arguments …

    A quote (dredged up from memory, paraphrased, and deprived of any of its original elegance) from the wayward, but often brilliant Joe Sobran: We’re taught that ad hominem argument is the worst kind but, in fact, it’s close to being the only kind that’s ever actually used.

    • #15
    • September 12, 2017, at 5:57 PM PST
    • Like
  16. filmklassik Member

    I’ve been hearing variations of “Trump’s a poor man’s version of what a rich man is supposed to be like” for 15 or 20 years now. The earliest one I can remember went something to the effect of, “The average guy loves Trump because he’s a rich guy who lives like a lottery winner.”

    …Or words to that effect. And I thought they summed him up rather nicely.

    What a jackass.

    • #16
    • September 12, 2017, at 6:41 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  17. DudleyDoright49 Coolidge

    Dear Mr. Williamson, I thoroughly enjoy your writing which is very good. I have also been a fan of Mad Dogs and Englishmen. Very insightful and a tad cutting. I have heard you and your compadre decry ad hominem attacks. Describing Melania Trump as a “eastern European mail order bride” was very disappointing. I understand and share your distaste for the Donald, but verbally beating up on his wife is as distasteful as he is.

    From the panhandle of Oklahoma

    • #17
    • September 13, 2017, at 4:41 PM PST
    • Like
  18. FredGoodhue Coolidge

    My definition of globalist is someone who sees himself more as a citizen of the world than as a citizen of his own nation. That people have many definitions makes Williamson’s point.

    • #18
    • September 14, 2017, at 7:22 AM PST
    • Like
  19. mikeInThe716 Member

    Mr Williamson’s writing and philosophy, while obviously annoying to Trump Nation, are a necessary tonic for keeping Constitutional conservative principles alive.

    I appreciate his (sometimes) harsh tone regarding “failed” parts of the US. As a mostly lifelong western NYer, his advice to “move” is spot on – I should have taken it 10 years ago.

    Note that “failed” parts of the US often map to Pro Football team values. The Buffalo Bills are dead last and the Cowboys are #1. 

    • #19
    • September 17, 2017, at 10:31 AM PST
    • 1 like