Denise Ho is a star in Hong Kong and in the broader Asian world. She is a singer and actress. She is also a democracy leader. She has been in the throes of the protests in her home city. What has her activism done to her artistic career? What are the prospects for the democracy movement in Hong Kong? What do protesters expect of the outside world, if anything? Denise Ho is a wonderful interviewee, in addition to a remarkable person.

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There are 3 comments.

  1. Clifford A. Brown Contributor

    First, I admire any who take such real risks, both physical and financial, for a moral good.

    Second, I no longer care to patronize Jackie Chan, who is now a Communist court jester. 

    Third, no one has any business peddling “freedom” in Hong Kong beyond the end date of the Basic Law. And “freedom” in Hong Kong is not to be asserted beyond the letter of the law that Communist China agreed to, in granting a fifty year grace period to this city in 1997.

    I have heard non-veteran blowhards blather that Britain (Prime Minister Thatcher) gave Hong Kong away. There is no scenario in the real world in which Hong Kong does not become a regular Communist Chinese city at the end of the grace period. It is a basic geographic reality.

    • #1
    • October 23, 2019, at 7:48 PM PST
    • Like
  2. WilliamDean Coolidge

    Clifford A. Brown (View Comment):

    First, I admire any who take such real risks, both physical and financial, for a moral good.

    Second, I no longer care to patronize Jackie Chan, who is now a Communist court jester.

    Third, no one has any business peddling “freedom” in Hong Kong beyond the end date of the Basic Law. And “freedom” in Hong Kong is not to be asserted beyond the letter of the law that Communist China agreed to, in granting a fifty year grace period to this city in 1997.

    I have heard non-veteran blowhards blather that Britain (Prime Minister Thatcher) gave Hong Kong away. There is no scenario in the real world in which Hong Kong does not become a regular Communist Chinese city at the end of the grace period. It is a basic geographic reality.

    Sure there is. That’s the scenario where the Communist regime no longer exists.

    This isn’t about peddling freedom in Hong Kong. It’s about peddling freedom in CHINA. And what would be so bad about freedom in China?

    The resistance in Hong Kong is a real thorn in the regime’s side. If the Chicoms don’t crack down, the mainland citizenry, already jealous of the freedom afforded to their HK brethren and the global influence and economic success that has come with it, will themselves become angered with the regime and possibly revolt. But if the party cracks down with violence a la Tiananmen, they set back significantly all the global outreach and influence building they’ve been trying to accomplish to keep their export demand afloat. They’re in a race against time to try and grow out economically enough to overcome growing instability due to a huge proportion of impoverished citizenry outside of the coastal areas, and such a setback would cost them dearly.

    Hong Kong’s “grace” period extends until 2047. It’s not certain the Chinese regime will last that long. I think formal support for the HK protesters, in terms of aid or even official administration statements, would be counterproductive, giving the Chicoms an out by making us a more plausible scapegoat for HK unrest. But little informal incidents like what occurred with the NBA that stoke the regime’s paranoia cost very little those of us not directly invested in ventures over there, and further damage the regime’s credibility as a leader of a peaceful prosperous world, to it’s own people as well as it’s international partners.

    • #2
    • October 24, 2019, at 2:58 AM PST
    • 2 likes
  3. colleenb Member

    Excellent interview. I have hope even though the ChiComs seem to have all the financial and social media power. 

    • #3
    • October 25, 2019, at 12:23 PM PST
    • 1 like