Decades of apocalyptic rhetoric surrounding the issue of climate change has failed to garner support for the austerity-based solutions on the table. Accordingly, Matt Frost and Jim Pethokoukis discuss how a climate policy agenda centered around promoting energy abundance is a better approach to mitigating climate change than doubling down on fatalistic messages and policy proposals that would make us poorer.

Matt is an environmental policy technologist, the deputy director of the Marine Biological Association, and the author of the recently published The New Atlantis article, “After Climate Despair”.

Learn more: Dietrich Vollrath: Is America’s economy fully grown? | Garett Jones: The case for ‘10 percent less democracy’ | Stan Veuger: Handle the coronavirus recession by preventing a business collapse

The post Matt Frost: An alternative to climate despair appeared first on American Enterprise Institute – AEI.

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  1. mildlyo Member
    mildlyo Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    I am inspired by the purity of my disagreement with Mr. Matt Frost. Some gems come to mind:

    “We need to force austerity on the deniers”

    “We need enough surplus to waste on human prosperity”

    “I’m not someone with a lot of technological expertise”

    No kidding.

    Unfortunately for you I just today heard a podcast interviewing Robert Bryce, who proposes an annual aspirational goal of 4 megawatt-hours per capita worldwide. I much prefer the idea of setting a goal and working to attain it, versus central planning the austerity that will get us to an imagined world that is all we deserve, really, when you think about it.

    • #1
    • April 8, 2020, at 4:13 PM PDT
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