Can Competition Reform America’s Education System?

Are America’s K-12 schools fixable? And do center-right policymakers have any better

ideas than just school vouchers? On this new episode of the Ricochet Money & Politics Podcast, I chat with Michael McShane, former inner-city high school teacher and current research fellow in education policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute.Some of McShane’s recent writings:

Common Core causes collateral damage

De Blasio cracks down on education reform

Advice to Republicans on school choice

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There are 10 comments.

  1. Profile Photo Member

    Watching videos of the Chicago teachers and the head woman, and then seeing youtube video of the teachers in Wisconsin, showed a bullying side to teachers. They were aggressive and mean about their opponents. They certainly were not debating their points. They wanted to yell and scream.
    It really took me aback.
    If school buildings are not allowed to be used by others who set up an alternative t their nice racket, that is a big red flag. What can the average citizen do though? As a parent, I would be terrified to post a word about it with these sorts of people running the teachers.

    • #1
    • March 19, 2014, at 4:25 PM PDT
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  2. Nick Stuart Inactive

    No. Only by completely separating public provision of education from public funding can competition be truly introduced. Parents should receive a voucher for the full per student amount allocated by the state for that child that they can use at the school of their choice.

    Government schools are irredeemably, and irremediably flawed. Experiments here and there that help a couple hundred children at a time are a cruel joke on the children and families who can’t get in. Their lives and educations should not be left to pure chance in lotteries, or political pull.

    • #2
    • March 19, 2014, at 7:02 PM PDT
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  3. Pony Convertible Member

    I agree completely. We all want all children to have an opportunity to be educated. This probably means the government has to provide it at some levels. However, that doesn’t mean it has to be the producer of education. Government provides food for the poor through food stamps. They do not own the farms, the food distribution network, or the grocery stores. The result is we all have access to a wide variety of foods, at reasonable prices, of high quality. We should have a similar market for education.

    • #3
    • March 20, 2014, at 5:01 AM PDT
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  4. GKC Inactive
    GKC

    Good families make good schools, it is that simple. With the breakdown of the family, I have little hope in our public schools.

    • #4
    • March 20, 2014, at 5:55 AM PDT
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  5. Profile Photo Member

    Vouchers will never go anywhere because middle-class white voters don’t want them. Having a bunch of inner-city black kids coming into a suburban white school is not most Republican voters’ idea of good public policy.

    • #5
    • March 20, 2014, at 9:24 AM PDT
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  6. SEnkey Inactive

    wmartin:
    Vouchers will never go anywhere because middle-class white voters don’t want them. Having a bunch of inner-city black kids coming into a suburban white school is not most Republican voters’ idea of good public policy.

     I don’t believe this is where the majority of voucher opposition originates. In fact, many suburban parents are begging for voucher programs. Most of the opposition is drummed up by public sector unions.

    Nick Stuart, I agree completely. What hypocrisy that the same people who called the 15% of people who either chose to forego, did not want or could not obtain health insurance a moral crisis allow millions of children to be cheated in their education. If it wasn’t so tragic I would laugh. 

    • #6
    • March 20, 2014, at 2:54 PM PDT
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  7. Profile Photo Member

    SEnkey:

     

    I don’t believe this is where the majority of voucher opposition originates. In fact, many suburban parents are begging for voucher programs. Most of the opposition is drummed up by public sector unions.

    Beyond maybe finding it a nice theoretical idea, I doubt that most suburban voters have thought much about vouchers at all (a mostly white, suburban school is already a de facto private school). Let “disadvantaged” students start flooding into the schools that the children of white Republican voters attend, and we will see how long those voters hold on to their conservative principles.

    • #7
    • March 20, 2014, at 4:38 PM PDT
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  8. lakelylane Inactive

    No link to podcast on computer or kindle fire!

    • #8
    • March 22, 2014, at 7:10 AM PDT
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  9. Mike Riley Member

    It is amazing to hear a proposal to create a government regulated private market for schools in the midst of the implementation of the same vision for health care. Part of the proposal is to educate a new administrative class for running schools. Why do we need this new administrative class? Because they have to understand the regulations.

    • #9
    • March 23, 2014, at 1:52 PM PDT
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  10. Profile Photo Member
    • #10
    • November 18, 2014, at 11:22 AM PDT
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