When they recorded this podcast, Mona had just returned from Texas and Jay had just arrived there. They sing a hymn of praise to Texas – a duet.

Then Mona tells us about the organization Wounded Warriors Family Support, on whose board she serves.

As the podcast continues, she and Jay discuss the Middle Eastern migration crisis (a true crisis). And the Islamic State, or ISIS: Has the Obama administration cooked the intelligence to make it look like ISIS is less of a threat than it is?

Inevitably, there’s discussion of Trump. And the podcast ends with a very lively discussion of Mount McKinley, or “Denali,” as we all must call it, since The President Himself has so decreed.

The podcast goes out with the middle movement – the Double Fugue – of the Symphony No. 2, “Mysterious Mountain,” by Alan Hovhaness.

 

Subscribe to Need to Know in Apple Podcasts (and leave a 5-star review, please!), or by RSS feed. For all our podcasts in one place, subscribe to the Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed in Apple Podcasts or by RSS feed.

Now become a Ricochet member for only $5.00 a month! Join and see what you’ve been missing.

There are 15 comments.

Become a member to join the conversation. Or sign in if you're already a member.
  1. Big John Member
    Big John
    @AllanRutter

    Hey, Mona! I listened to The Great Courses’ Robert Greenberg on Tchaikovsky! Wow! What a great story-teller. I listened this week driving from Dallas to College Station to Houston to Austin. Thanks for the special deal!

    • #1
  2. Mona Charen Contributor
    Mona Charen
    @MonaCharen

    Big John:Hey, Mona!I listened to The Great Courses’ Robert Greenberg on Tchaikovsky!Wow!What a great story-teller.I listened this week driving from Dallas to College Station to Houston to Austin.Thanks for the special deal!

    Fantastic! Robert Greenberg is a phenom, no?

    • #2
  3. Petty Boozswha Inactive
    Petty Boozswha
    @PettyBoozswha

    Jay and Mona, I want to agree with your analysis of Republican intramural turmoil, but then I’m confronted by events like last night, when I listened to Hugh Hewitt interviewing Lindsey Graham. Graham expounded on the damage this Iran deal is going to cause for about 10 minutes, laying out the existential danger to Israel and the US. Hewitt then asked him if it’s worth possibly modifying the filibuster rule – something Harry Reid did whenever it struck his fancy – the answer: nope. Senator McCain, to his great credit, did say this was so momentous that perhaps we should consider an exception.

    • #3
  4. Eugene Kriegsmann Member
    Eugene Kriegsmann
    @EugeneKriegsmann

    I climbed McKinley in 1978. I think of it interchangeably as McKinley and Denali, but primarily as McKinley. Had the Alaskans chosen to petition congress to have the name changed, and had they done so, I would be fine with the name change. However, for this embarrassment to make a change to something he has no knowledge of, no understanding of, is an act of theater. I suspect that he never gave Alaska, much less McKInley/Denali a thought in his entire previous life. He is on tear to cause as much disruption as he can in the remaining months of his reign (term in no way decribes Obama’s time in office). Of course, if it were President Trump the mountain wouldn’t be Denali, it would be Trump Tower.

    • #4
  5. Leslie Watkins Member
    Leslie Watkins
    @LeslieWatkins

    I agree with Jay wholeheartedly about Obama’s terrible mischief being the result of a lapse in judgment on the part of the American people. But in the instance of this Iran deal, from what I read the American public is overwhelmingly against it, yet neither Republican party leaders nor presidential candidates are bolstered enough by this fact to go out on a limb. Perhaps the media are not reporting on genuine attempts to keep this horrid event from happening, but for folks like me (not a conservative but a middle-of-the-roader), there seems to be only silence from the candidates and from the Congress on the absurdity of it. No one is challenging the president on his “it’s this or war” claptrap. (No one, that is, who can reach the middle.) Thoughtful people are fed up with it being all process and procedure. One of the Republican candidates must stop claiming that he (or she) is the answer but, instead, ask the people to help him (or her) keep it from happening. This is an easy case to make right now (far easier than repealing Obamacare). Go to the Internet if need be. Explain how dire the situation is and ask Americans to keep it from happening. So what if the effort fails? It’s better than talking of the severity of the issue and then declining to filibuster. We need a Mr. Smith to go to Washington and not just take a seat.

    • #5
  6. Ario IronStar Inactive
    Ario IronStar
    @ArioIronStar

    I continue to be mystified by Jay’s inability (or refusal?) to grasp the concept of “the establishment.”

    “The establishment” in any organization is that dominant faction that succeeds in setting the agenda.  Technically, public or party officeholders capable of taking action form the bedrock, but those who can influence the like-minded officeholders, or those who propagate the positions, are de facto members of the establishment.

    Note that the establishment is defined by potent actions, positions, and tactics, and by the ability to exert influence concerning them.  For a political party, the Republican party in this case, so long as there is effective leadership there will be an establishment. This is both a reasonable and useful concept.

    Jay, both you and Mona are currently part of the establishment because you reflect and advocate for enough of the currently dominant leadership positions.  Particularly, you reflect and advocate for the leadership position on immigration, and for the the leadership tactic of careful but ineffective, and thus unaccountable, opposition.

    For the former, both of you believe that while illegal immigration is regrettable and should be curtailed, nothing really can be done, and our current legal immigration regime is unproblematic and, if anything, should be expanded.  Neither of you wishes to recognize that a very very significant portion of the party grass roots disagrees vehemently on both parts of this establishment immigration position.  Those of us not living in multi-million dollar houses can see the culture being radically transformed by mass immigration.

    • #6
  7. Ario IronStar Inactive
    Ario IronStar
    @ArioIronStar

    With regard to Jay and Mona’s admonitions that  we don’t blame the Democrats and Obama enough, WHAT?  Everyone on the right, establishment, anti-establishment, or otherwise heretical, blames Obama and his idiotic, suicidal, and lawless policies and actions.  In fact, if this criticism applies meaningfully to anyone, it should be directed toward those Republican spokesmen who are far more careful in their criticism of Obama and Democrats than they are of their own rebellious conservatives, whom they feel perfectly free to call “crazies” and the like.

    What you are essentially saying is:  STOP CRITICIZING ME, YOU’RE JUST DOING DAMAGE TO THE CAUSE, YOU FOOLS!  But this is precisely the “Shut up, he explained” attitude that is making people’s heads explode.

    You may find the prospect of my head exploding rather enticing.  However, you’re going to find yourself without any Indians soon enough if that comes to pass.

    • #7
  8. Mister Magic Inactive
    Mister Magic
    @MisterMagic

    Those of us not living in multi-million dollar houses can see the culture being radically transformed by mass immigration.

    Are you suggesting that Jay and Mona live in multi-million dollar houses? If not, why the need to resort to populist hyperbole?

    • #8
  9. Crabby Appleton Inactive
    Crabby Appleton
    @CrabbyAppleton

    There is no reason to believe that Donald Trump is either a Republican (which is probably meaningless these days, anyway) or a genuine conservative. He is a cuckoo in a nest of real Republican and conservative candidates.

    • #9
  10. goldwaterwoman Thatcher
    goldwaterwoman
    @goldwaterwoman

    Obama and Co, when shoving Obamacare down the throats of Congress, distinctly said many times, “Elections have consequences.”  After we were given control, I can’t recall a single instance of our saying the same thing.  Say what you will about Pelosi and Reid, but they knew how to use their power while we continue to play the victim despite the power the electorate gave us.  Hence, the Republicans turn to a guy like Trump who understands power and how to use it.

    • #10
  11. rah Inactive
    rah
    @rah

    Jay and Mona,

    When you use “blood and soil” in the same sentence as Donald Trump, are you calling him a racist? ;-)

    Seriously, here’s the Wikipedia entry on the subject: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blood_and_Soil

    Or at the very least Roderick Spode: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roderick_Spode

    Okay, fine, Mosley: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oswald_Mosley

    You don’t mean *them*, do you?

    • #11
  12. Cat III Member
    Cat III
    @CatIII

    Jay using “pussy” as an insult is really funny. Surprised that one didn’t get bleeped.

    Mister Magic:

    Those of us not living in multi-million dollar houses can see the culture being radically transformed by mass immigration.

    Are you suggesting that Jay and Mona live in multi-million dollar houses? If not, why the need to resort to populist hyperbole?

    Thanks for saying this. Really hate the knee-jerk accusations the “base” hurls at any dissenters. Contrary to popular opinion, being a rich snob isn’t the only reason one would deviate from hardline restrictionism.

    • #12
  13. RJCool Inactive
    RJCool
    @RJCool

    Another great podcast – fire flaring out of Mona’s nostrils and Jay working blue (goldarnit).  I was very interested to hear about Mona’s work with the Wounded Warrior Family Support (?) group.  Like many, I am sympathetic, empathetic but ultimately pathetic in my ability to help other than to donate money.  Why couldn’t the tools of social media (of which I know little) be harnessed to better assist veterans and their families.  If I have a ratty old couch I want to dispose of, Craigslist will get two dudes there in a couple of hours.  My concept would be to identify a composition of skill sets necessary to support these families (“V-Team”) that could be developed based on past experience (plumbers, drivers, building supplies, etc.).  In each community, you could solicit volunteers to commit to a team that would be paired with specific families while also developing a local network of general skills that could quickly be contacted via text messaging.  Just a thought and maybe it’s already in place, but as always you two get me thinking.

    • #13
  14. Ario IronStar Inactive
    Ario IronStar
    @ArioIronStar

    Cat III:…

    Mister Magic:

    Those of us not living in multi-million dollar houses can see the culture being radically transformed by mass immigration.

    Are you suggesting that Jay and Mona live in multi-million dollar houses? If not, why the need to resort to populist hyperbole?

    Thanks for saying this. Really hate the knee-jerk accusations the “base” hurls at any dissenters…being a rich snob isn’t the only reason one would deviate from hardline restrictionism.

    If you’re going to accuse someone of making a knee-jerk comment, you should at least attempt to address the points the “jerk” tried to make.  Or who’s the jerk?

    Mona and Jay are oblivious to the effect that the mass, ill-directed immigration of the last decade or so has had on our culture and society (I know where Mona lives). Living and working isolated from, say, Muslims in beards and burqas who insist that society should conform to them, or seeing low-skill illegals, working or not, pulling in government benefits and expecting it as their due, or seeing relatively rich school districts like Fairfax county suddenly unable to meet their costs because of the influx of kids whose parents can’t pay the necessary taxes, makes it easy to extol the virtues of immigration.

    If you think your (or Mona’s and Jay’s) position on immigration is conservative, then what are you conserving?  I assume you don’t see the above phenomena, which was my point.

    • #14
  15. Ario IronStar Inactive
    Ario IronStar
    @ArioIronStar

    Mona and Jay agreed at the close of their immigration discussion that the “nativist” or “restrictionist” position is not a winner.  So far it has been, big-time, for Trump. But it’s early days (you say) and he won’t last.

    Think back to 2007 after the Democrats took over Congress and GW Bush brought forward his amnesty program (“comprehensive immigration reform”).  It got killed. Why? Bush wanted it. The Democrats in Congress wanted it. I recall Michael Medved (a rabidly pro-amnesty conservative, much as I like most all his other positions) screaming that its failure was all the fault of Ann Coulter and other far-right demagogues.  How is that possible?

    Remember, it could not get through Nancy Pelosi’s House!  They heard it from their constituents.  Democrat voters are pissed off about immigration too!

    Here’s my prediction:  if Sanders is the Democrat nominee (possible), he will run as an immigration restrictionist.  And he will win if the Republican nominee is an open-borders type, or a reasonable facsimile thereof.

    • #15
Become a member to join the conversation. Or sign in if you're already a member.