Olsen

Henry Olsen

This episode begins with a guest, Henry Olsen, a guru on elections and electorates, among other things. Then Mona and Jay proceed with a smorgasbord of issues—beginning with Hong Kong. Could Tiananmen Square be repeated? And how about the broader question of democracy, for peoples that don’t have it? Democracy for me but not for thee?NTK Feature

Mona and Jay wonder whether President Obama has learned a little humility in the business of terrorist-killing: It can be hard to do it without injuring or killing innocent people in the process. Is it okay when we inflict collateral damage but not when Israel does?

The University of Chicago has done a stirring thing: dropped the Confucius Institute from its campus. These Confucius Institutes are bad news, because they are “soft power” extensions of the Chinese Communist Party. Speaking of East Asian Communists: Where is Kim Jong-un, that onetime Swiss schoolboy? Sidelined by gout? Too much cheese?

Really, it is a story, as are the other subjects on this show.

The closing music is the last few minutes of Stravinsky’s ballet The Firebird. The recording is by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Pierre Boulez. Our excerpt begins with a French-horn solo.

This solo figured in a review by Jay yesterday. The Berlin Philharmonic opened Carnegie Hall’s season with a program that included the final scenes from The Firebird. Jay said that the best thing about the whole evening was the solo by Stefan Dohr, the Berliners’ peerless principal horn.

To hear Dohr himself play the solo in question, years ago, go here.

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  1. Eeyore Member
    Eeyore
    @Eeyore

    Mona and Jay wonder whether President Obama has learned a little humility…

    I haven’t listened to the podcast, but the answer is a giant No! He was almost all the way back to “The rise of the oceans will begin to slow!” fervor when he spoke to the Congressional Hipanic Caucus Conference.

    • #1
  2. Petty Boozswha Inactive
    Petty Boozswha
    @PettyBoozswha

    Great podcast, as usual. So many things inspired a comment, but I’ll limit myself to one: I am still troubled by the pollster’s shorthand use of the phrase “white working class.” Can’t there be an agreed upon replacement? The people that make up of the “white working class” do not want to exclude other people – I’ve read that between 6% to 8% of the Tea Party are African-Americans. Any Black, Asian or Latino person that wants to assimilate into the traditional American lifestyle is welcome to join the “white working class” – why not call them some agreed upon, less pejorative name. Middle American voters,or 1950’s sitcom voters or some such.

    • #2
  3. Sabrdance Member
    Sabrdance
    @Sabrdance

    Grrr.

    First Richard Epstein opens his mouth without knowledge, now Jay and Mona.

    Rick Santorum did exactly what you said you wanted him to do.  He started as a low level activist, which he did for nearly 20 years.  He was a lawyer and advocate, and then he ran for the House, then the Senate, then went back to being a lawyer, and then ran for President.

    You have an encyclopedia at your fingertips.  Use it!

    • #3
  4. kylez Member
    kylez
    @kylez

    Funny how Colorado turned purple with the growing numbers of Natural-Republican Hispanics moving in. Strange.

    • #4
  5. kylez Member
    kylez
    @kylez

    Petty Boozswha:Great podcast, as usual. So many things inspired a comment, but I’ll limit myself to one: I am still troubled by the pollster’s shorthand use of the phrase “white working class.” Can’t there be an agreed upon replacement? The people that make up of the “white working class” do not want to exclude other people – I’ve read that between 6% to 8% of the Tea Party are African-Americans. Any Black, Asian or Latino person that wants to assimilate into the traditional American lifestyle is welcome to join the “white working class” – why not call them some agreed upon, less pejorative name. Middle American voters,or 1950′s sitcom voters or some such.

    How about American Citizens Who Work for a Living.

    • #5
  6. Podkayne of Israel Member
    Podkayne of Israel
    @PodkayneofIsrael

    Will Obama learn some humility about eliminating terrorists? Does a hen have lips?

    He’s an affirmative action baby, and has learned over the years that he need not stand up to any objective measure. It’s probably too late for anything to sink in now.

    As an Israeli parent, I have frequently had qualms about the way our children are expected to perform as adults upon their induction into the IDF. It’s tough on them, and pretty tough for a parent as well. But for many, the confidence that comes from having been tested is a great advantage.

    I guess I’m a bit sorry for Obama, finding out at this stage of his life, and in the eyes of all, that reality can be unforgiving.

    • #6
  7. user_212095 Contributor
    user_212095
    @MonaCharen

    How’s “middle income Americans”?

    • #7
  8. Petty Boozswha Inactive
    Petty Boozswha
    @PettyBoozswha

    Mona Charen:How’s “middle income Americans”?

    Perfect.

    • #8
  9. gts109 Member
    gts109
    @gts109

    Yeah, as noted above, Santorum was a lawyer with a firm then called Kirkpatrick & Lockhart in Pittsburgh. Among other things, he defended the WWF while working there. He got into politics, and then out of it. After his Senate days, he worked at Eckert Seamans, another Pittsburgh-based law firm, but in its DC office. I don’t know what he does now, but he’s made a living for plenty of years in the private sector. I believe he has a MBA, in addition to his law degree.

    • #9
  10. gts109 Member
    gts109
    @gts109

    Yeah, Mona, you don’t want to alienate the critical “Leave It to Beaver” demo.

    • #10