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  1. contrarian Inactive
    contrarian
    @Contrarian

    At 6m30s, the point is made that the Alabama election showed that the danger is in losing suburban women, but…

     

    Even in the midst of the tidal wave of sexual misconduct allegations, one key demographic still came out for Moore strongly — white, suburban women voters who hold the key to numerous races across the country in 2018. Two-thirds of suburban white women voters supported Moore.

    Moreover, 80 percent of voters who turned out for Moore did so as staunch Trump supporters.

    Even though 98 percent of African American women supported Moore’s opponent Doug Jones, only 34 percent of white women voters did so. While that figure is still somewhat impressive — double the number of white women who voted for Barack Obama in Alabama in 2012 — it is not significant enough to make a difference in 2018 in other contests where republican candidates are far superior to Moore.

    Suburban women voters who hold the key to 2018 favor President Trump and were the key to his victory in 2016.

    The reason?

    Republican candidates and President Trump uphold issues that suburban women voters care about: national security, border protection, record stock markets, jobs, tax reform, and the opioid crisis that is hitting their suburbs. As long as they continue to stick to those issues, republicans can win in 2018.

    source: http://thehill.com/opinion/campaign/365244-womens-role-in-alabama-senate-campaign-gives-clues-to-2018-midtermshttp://thehill.com/opinion/campaign/365244-womens-role-in-alabama-senate-campaign-gives-clues-to-2018-midterms

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