Jay revisits some old favorites and hails at least one new favorite.

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Or rather, three nominees. Plus, Gerard Schwarz, the trumpeter/conductor whom Jay interviewed recently on his “Q&A” (here). This episode provides beauty, wonder, excitement, controversy, solace – it’s music.

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Jay says “Happy Independence Day” with a buffet of American music, starting with “The Banjo” and ending with “America the Beautiful.” In between, you will have many melodies, many voices, all adding up to America. Have a great one.

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Introducing this episode, Jay says, “Gonna throw a little ballet at you” – and he does. Some music from ballets. He also throws in some arias, some jazz, and more. An interesting, diverse, soul-pleasing episode. 

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Jay discusses, and plays, an old song: “A Soft Day.” You also have a little music from Brazil. And a composer who escaped the Nazis. And some Cole Porter. Also, what about the question of Wagner? Can you listen to him, SOB that he was? Finally, Franco Zeffirelli died – which leads to a reflection on him, and to an aria. In short, there’s plenty to think about in this episode, and plenty to hear.

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From Norway, a story about Mrs. Grieg – and some music by Mr. From Israel, some thoughts about Bruch, Bloch, and others. This episode also includes a dollop of Rameau, a spiritual, a heavenly piece by Chopin, and more. Food for thought and soul.

This is a podcast of The New Criterion.

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Jay Nordlinger begins a new podcast, a music ’cast. As he says, he’ll talk about music – make some points, tell some stories, tell some jokes – but mainly play music. Because why talk when you can listen? He begins this inaugural episode with the song from which he swipes his title (“Music for a While”). There is also some piano music by Prokofiev – music seldom heard. Jay remembers a couple of musicians who have died recently. And he closes with a song from “Kiss Me, Kate,” which is back on Broadway.

“Music for a while,” goes Henry Purcell’s song, “shall all your cares beguile.”

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