There are 11 comments.

  1. Stan Hjerleid Inactive

    I’m sorry to have such a closed mind but after the hatchet job Conrad Black did on Diana West’s book American Betrayal in National Review Online (entitled Diana West’s Epic Fail) – nothing he says is of interest to me. I for one will not buy his book.

    • #1
    • September 13, 2013, at 10:41 AM PST
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  2. captainpower Inactive

    Wasn’t he arrested for some trumped up charges?

    I’m curious to learn more about him and if anyone can help with that, it’s Mr. Rosenberg.

    • #2
    • September 14, 2013, at 1:34 AM PST
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  3. Sean Inactive
    captainpower: Wasn’t he arrested for some trumped up charges?

    I’m curious to learn more about him and if anyone can help with that, it’s Mr. Rosenberg. · 13 minutes ago

    Edited 13 minutes ago

    I would start with this:

    http://www.macleans.ca/business/companies/article.jsp?content=20070730_107322_107322&page=1

    And if you want the 500 page version, this:

    • #3
    • September 14, 2013, at 4:51 AM PST
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  4. Milt Rosenberg Contributor

    About Conrad Black: He does modern history (and political biography) with dash, verve, research that yields surprises and sometimes delights—and, all in all, with appropriate conservative values informing his judgments.

    The summer he was on trial here in Chicago before a federal judge, Mark Steyn was in town for a few months reporting on the trial for MacLean’s magazine. It was Mark’s strong opinion that Lord Black would never have been convicted in a Canadian court. At any rate Black served a few years in federal prison with dignity, stoicism and great application (he wrote two major books while “behind bars.”)

    The original case was based on the accusation that he had filched from the treasury of the Chicago Sun Times of which, at the time, he was major owner. One should remember the great revival of the U.K. paper which he restored and also of the Jerusalem Post which he owned.

    He seems to me a rather remarkable man with a superior intelligence, considerable achievement as a political historian and willing to pay the piper for his possible financial indiscretions.

     

    • #4
    • September 14, 2013, at 5:56 AM PST
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  5. Wolverine Coolidge

    I loved his biography of Nixon and always find him an interesting read. In addition, he always answers his e-mails. Not sure what to make of the Diana West saga. I did read her book and respect both people. However, have to wonder how correct she is when she is being attacked on her history by fellow conservatives.

    • #5
    • September 14, 2013, at 6:32 AM PST
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  6. Black Prince Member
    Stan Hjerleid: I’m sorry to have such a closed mind but after the hatchet job Conrad Black did on Diana West’s book American Betrayal in National Review Online (entitled Diana West’s Epic Fail) – nothing he says is of interest to me. I for one will not buy his book.

    That’s really too bad…you should reconsider…it’s your loss.

    • #6
    • September 14, 2013, at 7:01 AM PST
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  7. Carey J. Inactive
    Stan Hjerleid: I’m sorry to have such a closed mind but after the hatchet job Conrad Black did on Diana West’s book American Betrayal in National Review Online (entitled Diana West’s Epic Fail) – nothing he says is of interest to me. I for one will not buy his book. · 8 hours ago

    He also wrote, on July 4th of this year, that the Declaration of Independence was too tough on George III

    • #7
    • September 14, 2013, at 12:01 PM PST
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  8. Profile Photo Member

    I supported Lord Black when he was convicted on trumped-up charges, suffering the ridicule of my faculty colleagues. I admired the grace and aplomb with which he lived under incarceration and continually worked for the betterment of those around him, proving that true entrepreneurs always know how to make lemonade out of lemons.

    Then he joined the dogpile on Diana West with this execrable piece of attack-writing, and then went on to assert, without a trace of irony, that it was preposterous to think that he had engaged in ad hominem against her.

    The first thing I want to hear from the Dark Lord, Ron Radosh or David Horowitz before I take their writing seriously again is a mea culpa on the tone they have injected into this academic dispute and walk back into level of civility I expect to find between conservatives who respectfully differ. (And from Radosh a clear concession of the many errors in his critique.) And first perhaps he should read her book.

    Fortunately many good folks have weighed in to support West. Frank Gaffney’s Center for Security Policy has chosen to honour her with a prestigious award for her bold writing.

    • #8
    • September 15, 2013, at 1:23 AM PST
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  9. Profile Photo Member

    Conrad writes the best articles about the political scene. He described Michelle Obama as “callipygous” as the first campaign began and we were seeing the Obama family for the first time.

    His comments on the American prison system were interesting. I am enjoying Milt’s interviews and appreciate him interviewing Conrad. 

    • #9
    • September 15, 2013, at 7:04 AM PST
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  10. Carey J. Inactive

    Actually, the term callipygous implies that the buttocks in question are beautiful. Steatopygous, which simply means having large, prominent, buttocks, is a more accurate description of Michelle Obama. There is little or nothing beautiful about that woman.

    • #10
    • September 15, 2013, at 11:03 AM PST
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  11. Atavist Member

    Mr. Black, I do enjoy your written and spoken efforts to address the great topics in American history, but I must take offence to your characterization (@38:11) of Gen. McClellan as a “slack” general. He forged the wartime Union army and led it to a bloody victory at Antietam, the North’s greatest victory prior to Gettysburg.

    In general, the disparagement of George B. McClellan in popular history should stop. He understood that the Confederacy fought in Clausewitzian space, that is to say, with a political rather than a military objective as the primary war aim. In other words, the South fought to convince Northern political opinion that the war wasn’t worth the fight, rather than to invade and conquer the territory of the Union. In order to prevail, the larger Union forces, fighting primarily on Rebel territory, needed to avoid decisive loss rather than achieve outright victory, and Gen. McClellan deployed and engaged the Army of the Potomac accordingly and effectively, although that was not immediately apparent. After Antietam the Confederates withdrew back to Virginia, and Gen. Lee knew that the North could withstand the full measure of the South’s biggest, best led and equipped army.

    • #11
    • October 3, 2013, at 10:36 AM PST
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