Sam Nunberg: The Perfect Poster Child Of American Politics

Sam Nunberg wants you to know—He’s as drunk as hell and he’s not gonna…..no-wait—he’s mad. He’s MAD as h…you know what–never mind.

Whatever Nunberg is, we get analysis from the Washington Examiner’s Phil Wegmann.

The brilliant Yuval Levin on America’s “bonkers” political moment.

And a girl’s basketball team in Massachusetts gets attacked for being….TOO good?

Your comments, observations and incoherent drunken ramblings are all welcome! Call the Confession Hotline at 617-903-8255

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Published in: Politics
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  1. contrarian Member
    contrarian
    @Contrarian
    1. “This isn’t the most vicious assault on American democracy. This isn’t Watergate.” – I tend to agree, but the lefty show I heard just before this one said the exact opposite.
    2. “Sign a truce” a) Russia attempted to manipulate public opinion before the election b) Trump won & Hillary lost. c) ‘A’ did not cause ‘B’ – Obviously you’re a Kremlin agent if you deny that foreign agents stole the presidency from Clinton!
    3. on policy more aggressive toward Russia than Obama ever was” – Have you tried telling liberal Democrats that? I was called fake news – LOL!
    4. “we all stick with our tribe” – We shouldn’t make the mistake of conflating tribalism and team sports politics. Tribalism is reflexive and unreflective. It’s just about emotions. Team sports can be completely rational. It’s all about coalitions.
    5. we had 8 years of orderly and it stunk” – 16 years
    6. “we aren’t accomplishing much that will persist “ – What is left of Obama’s legacy? A zombie healthcare plan and 2 ladies on SCOTUS.
    7. “Tariffs” – I asked for more data. Thank you for the info.
      1. Are you sure it’s 33K jobs gained vs 180K lost? I’d not have been surprised at that many affected (lower wages, fewer hours, etc), but that seems really high for the number of losses.
      2. The other aspect is how this fits into national security. Domestic steel and aluminum are a necessity if we have to go to war. Also, these tariffs target China – which could be part of a strategy to get them to pressure North Korea, which is a much more urgent security issue.
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  2. Israel P. Member
    Israel P.
    @IsraelP

    I had pneumonia in eighth grade and missed three weeks of school. While I was out, the English teacher gave a test on nouns and the highest grade was 65. Everyone complained that the test was unfair.

    Unbeknownst to me, the teacher made a deal with the class. If I would get a score no greater than seventy, the test gets thrown out. If not, well then.

    I got a 90 and everyone was really mad. I was glad I didn’t know about the deal because it would have gone against my nature to test badly on purpose.

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  3. Chris Member
    Chris
    @Chris

    There is a difference between pulling your starters and killing the opposition, and leaving them in and killing the opposition.   It is not comparable to asking someone to tank a test so the rest of the class gets the curve.

    A lopsided situation is an opportunity to have kids come off the bench and gain experience – your starters gain nothing by running up the score while your reserve players wonder “when do I get my chance to show the coach a bit more if not in a game like this?”  Leaving in the starters also increases their chance of injury in return for very little – valuable experience comes from quality opponents, not patsies.

    I have more respect for a coach who pulls starters and downshifts the gameplan (say in football limiting play calling, in basketball no press or having the kids shoot longer shots), than one who tries to tell me they had to leave starters on the floor to romp over an opponent because they were somehow worried about the starters’ psyches.

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