Why the UN needs to hear from the “un-presidential” Donald Trump

Russiagate? It’s the “Talk Like A Pirate” Day of American Politics.

The WSJ’s Jason Gay on why ESPN’s big problem isn’t liberalism.

And the great Jonah Goldberg on the lessons we should be learning from re-visting the Vietnam War.

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  1. BThompson Inactive

    I appreciate that you bring on guests who don’t share or toe the conservative line and go back and for the with them. I wish more of the conservative commentariat did this. I thought the conversation with Jason Gay was very good and he made a lot of good points.

    I have to say, though, that for him to claim that the liberal bias and preaching on ESPN isn’t affecting their bottom line is silly on it’s face. Of course chord cutting and the disruption of the cable business model is a huge part, probably the majority part, of the problems ESPN is facing. However, to say that the grating political sermons and liberal storylines aren’t hurting ESPN is to argue that the content aired on a network is irrelevant to its ratings. It’s a ridiculous claim.

    The vast, vast majority of ESPN’s audience are males from ages 18-54. The majority of this group identifies as conservative, and likely voted by over 50% for Trump. That means that a majority of ESPN’s audience does not like the liberal content, a very significant portion of them surely dislike this content intensely to the point of turning it off.

    Now one could argue that even though a majority of the target audience is put-off by the liberal content, ESPN offers enough content that they do like to put up with the SJW garbage. Fair enough, but while most conservatives may tolerate the slanted political agenda of the network for the sake of the content they like, a significant portion surely do not. And of those who do tolerate it, most of them, like myself, watch far, far less of ESPN than they otherwise would. I used to enjoy watching SportsCenter and much of the pre- and postgame coverage. I no longer even bother. I also have stopped listening to ESPN radio for the most part, while at one point I would listen to a couple hours a day.

    There is no denying that the liberal bias on ESPN is bad for business. To claim that ESPN isn’t driving away viewers isn’t evidence based rationality, it’s myopic denial.

    • #1
    • September 19, 2017, at 8:18 AM PDT
    • 3 likes
  2. Merrijane Thatcher

    BThompson (View Comment):
    To claim that ESPN isn’t driving away viewers isn’t evidence based rationality, it’s myopic denial.

    I often wonder if they only deny things like this in public as a means of spinning things positively. It’s possible that internal company discussions are far different. But I don’t know why publicly admitting to a problem is considered such a bad thing … unless they have no intention of correcting it.

    • #2
    • September 19, 2017, at 9:30 AM PDT
    • 1 like
  3. Michael Graham Contributor

    BThompson (View Comment):
    I appreciate that you bring on guests who don’t share or toe the conservative line and go back and for the with them. I wish more of the conservative commentariat did this. I thought the conversation with Jason Gay was very good and he made a lot of good points.

    I have to say, though, that for him to claim that the liberal bias and preaching on ESPN isn’t affecting their bottom line is silly on it’s face. Of course chord cutting and the disruption of the cable business model is a huge part, probably the majority part, of the problems ESPN is facing. However, to say that the grating political sermons and liberal storylines aren’t hurting ESPN is to argue that the content aired on a network is irrelevant to its ratings. It’s a ridiculous claim.

    The vast, vast majority of ESPN’s audience are males from ages 18-54. The majority of this group identifies as conservative, and likely voted by over 50% for Trump. That means that a majority of ESPN’s audience does not like the liberal content, a very significant portion of them surely dislike this content intensely to the point of turning it off.

    Now one could argue that even though a majority of the target audience is put-off by the liberal content, ESPN offers enough content that they do like to put up with the SJW garbage. Fair enough, but while most conservatives may tolerate the slanted political agenda of the network for the sake of the content they like, a significant portion surely do not. And of those who do tolerate it, most of them, like myself, watch far, far less of ESPN than they otherwise would. I used to enjoy watching SportsCenter and much of the pre- and postgame coverage. I no longer even bother. I also have stopped listening to ESPN radio for the most part, while at one point I would listen to a couple hours a day.

    There is no denying that the liberal bias on ESPN is bad for business. To claim that ESPN isn’t driving away viewers isn’t evidence based rationality, it’s myopic denial.

    Your argument is strong on paper, but hard to quantify with data. I think Gay makes a good point that the market forces are so strong it’s rational to conclude they’re entirely responsible for ESPN’s decline. Then again, there could be other factors, like “I’m sick of the politics!” But how do you find that data? It’s all anecdotal.

    Thanks for the comments and the insights!

    • #3
    • September 19, 2017, at 10:03 AM PDT
    • Like
  4. Vectorman Thatcher

    Michael, how about ESPN or other sports programs try an experiment – no SJW or other non-sport related commentary, and see if the hemorrhaging decline can be reversed or slowed down. After all, Fox News took over from CNN by being “fair and balanced.” I’d be willing to bet this would bring back significant viewership.

    Also, I’m tired with special interest stories on how competitor “X” struggled in early life to become an Olympian or major player. And I turn off basketball games whenever the camera focuses on a coach or player while the game is in session, like missing a block of an inbound pass, etc.

    This dog doesn’t like the dog food being shoved at us by the networks.

    • #4
    • September 19, 2017, at 10:35 AM PDT
    • Like