Train Wrecks, Taxes, And The Trump Doctrine

A tragic train wreck in Seattle, while the GOP Congress appears to be avoiding one of their own on today’s tax bill vote.

Why are liberals obsessed with spending billions of tax dollars on the cutting edge technology of the 19th century?

An analysis of the Trump Doctrine from the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies.

And the winner of the most annoying word or phrase of 2017 is…..

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Published in: General

There are 11 comments.

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  1. Kim K. Member
    Kim K.
    @KimK

    Regarding language peeves – I hate it when someone starts a response with so. As in,

    “Will you be home for dinner?”

    “So..I have a meeting until 4 and then I have to pick up my prescriptions and then I’ll be home.”

    I am also trying to rid myself of saying “no problem” as a response to someone thanking me. I came to understand recently that this really gets under some people’s skin and I think I understand why. However, it is a hard habit to break.

    • #1
  2. scottmorales Member
    scottmorales
    @scottmorales

    Re: loathsome common expressions:

    Even though it does appear to me that more people are sounding off in support of my side about this annoyance recently, but the longstanding incorrect substitution of “raises the questions” (or the like) for “begs the question” completely drives me batty.  It derails me every time. I’m now to the point that when I hear it I consciously, in my own internal dialog say, “Raises the question”,  and then tune back into the speaker. Who knows what I’ve missed? But it couldn’t be that darn  important; he doesn’t know what question begging is. Aaaah, see now I’m getting mean.  Anyway, I fight on! “Question begging” actually means something.

     

     

    • #2
  3. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    Just remember, Michael, we beat on you because we care. Good show today.

    My grandfather was a railroad executive and I love trains. But I think spending public money for them is a silly thing to do. Instead, if someone wants to ride the choo-choo, I suggest a place like Greenfield Village at The Henry Ford where they have trains and steamboats and early cars and horse-drawn omnibuses as part of the historical experience. Even at the Detroit Zoo, there is a mini train to get people from one end of the park to the other quickly. Wanna ride a train? There’s your answer. Don’t take millions or billions in public tax dollars to indulge your fantasies, people.

    • #3
  4. dishee Member
    dishee
    @

    Michael, I know you have no problem with it but I hate “I could care less.”  I always respond with, “So you do, in fact, care a little bit?”  I also can’t stand, “Happy Belated Birthday!”.  I reply, “My birthday came on time. Your good wishes are what’s late.”  Okay, maybe I reply silently in my head.  Whatever. Same diff!  (numbers 3 & 4 annoying phrases :) )

    • #4
  5. Michael Graham Contributor
    Michael Graham
    @MichaelGraham

    dishee (View Comment):
    Michael, I know you have no problem with it but I hate “I could care less.” I always respond with, “So you do, in fact, care a little bit?” I also can’t stand, “Happy Belated Birthday!”. I reply, “My birthday came on time. Your good wishes are what’s late.” Okay, maybe I reply silently in my head. Whatever. Same diff! (numbers 3 & 4 annoying phrases :) )

    Dishee— it’s an idiom, as in “it makes no sense.”  You think tax cuts are a big deal? Well, big deal. Fat chance getting me to buy that. I could care less whether you agree or not!

    • #5
  6. Michael Graham Contributor
    Michael Graham
    @MichaelGraham

    Kim K. (View Comment):
    Regarding language peeves – I hate it when someone starts a response with so. As in,

    “Will you be home for dinner?”

    “So..I have a meeting until 4 and then I have to pick up my prescriptions and then I’ll be home.”

    I am also trying to rid myself of saying “no problem” as a response to someone thanking me. I came to understand recently that this really gets under some people’s skin and I think I understand why. However, it is a hard habit to break.

    I’m with you on the “No problem” instead of “You’re welcome.”  I developed that bad habit, too.

    • #6
  7. Michael Graham Contributor
    Michael Graham
    @MichaelGraham

    scottmorales (View Comment):
    Re: loathsome common expressions:

    Even though it does appear to me that more people are sounding off in support of my side about this annoyance recently, but the longstanding incorrect substitution of “raises the questions” (or the like) for “begs the question” completely drives me batty. It derails me every time. I’m now to the point that when I hear it I consciously, in my own internal dialog say, “Raises the question”, and then tune back into the speaker. Who knows what I’ve missed? But it couldn’t be that darn important; he doesn’t know what question begging is. Aaaah, see now I’m getting mean. Anyway, I fight on! “Question begging” actually means something.

    Well, if we’re really going to peeve the pet…

    People, more than 50 percent of you say “over” when you mean “more than.”  You can climb a ladder and stand over 100 people and observe that you are standing over more than 99 of them, but when it’s an amount, the correct phrase is “more than.”

    Get over it.

    • #7
  8. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    Michael Graham (View Comment):
    I’m with you on the “No problem” instead of “You’re welcome.” I developed that bad habit, too.

    I blame this on those Latins. The main French or Spanish reply is, “It’s nothing.” (Literally, “of nothing.”) But they also have their “No problem” versions.

    • #8
  9. Michael Graham Contributor
    Michael Graham
    @MichaelGraham

    From a listener:
    It is unbelievable how often the word unbelievable is used, particularly while watching sports.

    I apologize for pointing it out because now you’ll see how unbelievably often it is used.

    And ironically, after Trump was elected, I pretty believe anything can happen!

    Love the podcast!

    Mark,

    Ipswich, MA

    • #9
  10. Trish Member
    Trish
    @

    Michael Graham (View Comment):
    Dishee— it’s an idiom, as in “it makes no sense.” You think tax cuts are a big deal? Well, big deal. Fat chance getting me to buy that. I could care less whether you agree or not!

    That’s fine, Michael.  Just know you are keeping company with the loony Progressives at Slate! http://www.slate.com/blogs/lexicon_valley/2014/03/18/why_i_could_care_less_is_not_as_irrational_or_ungrammatical_as_you_might.html

    Hahaha!

    • #10
  11. FredGoodhue Coolidge
    FredGoodhue
    @FredGoodhue

    There is “15 items or less” vs. “15 items or fewer”.

    • #11