After Facebook’s oversight board determined that the former president should remain suspended from the social network, what is next for Donald Trump and his social-media following? John Yoo, a Hoover Institution visiting fellow and UC-Berkeley law professor, examines the constitutionality of Facebook’s and Twitter’s Trump temporary and permanent bans and whether the platforms will continue to enjoy federal legal protection as so-called “public squares.” 

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  1. Taras Coolidge
    Taras
    @Taras

    To my untutored eye, the grounds that the Supreme Court used to permit campaign finance reform laws seem to apply here.

    If Twitter and Facebook can prevent one side from being heard, they put in question the fundamental fairness of our elections.

    Furthermore, if they accuse Donald Trump or anyone else of inciting violence, he should be able to sue them for slander.  That the slander is linked with deplatforming only makes it more damaging.

    Similarly, when Gina Carano was fired by Disney on the specious basis of anti-Semitism, she also seems to have grounds for a lawsuit.

    • #1
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