Will Princess Meghan Bring Down Britain’s Monarchy?

This week on The United Kingdom’s Most Trusted Podcast® James and Toby discuss the public relations catastrophe that is the September issue of British Vogue, guest-edited by Meghan Markle.

Then the duo wax their bottoms and take a side trip to Love Island and all before writing a love letter to the new Leader of the House under the Johnson Government and making sure they do it with the utmost proper grammar.

 

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There are 13 comments.

  1. Goldwaterwoman Thatcher

    We have all loved and adored that sad little red-headed boy from the day he walked behind his mother’s casket and wish nothing but happiness for him. I have worried that his marriage would have more than its share of difficulties as their backgrounds are so very different culturally and otherwise. Nothing made their differences more apparent than their wedding day as we watched her mother sitting in the pew as the lone representative of Megan’s family while Harry’s side was awash with relatives he had grown up with and loved. I’ve often wondered why her mother didn’t even have a single friend or relative from the US sitting with her and thought it did not bode well. The fact that her father wasn’t even there to walk her down the aisle was a huge red flag.

     That said, I do wish the British press would cut her a bit of slack while she goes through a very steep learning curve and adjusts to a life so very different from the one she grew up in. Given time, she may overcome all these obstacles and play the role she is meant to and accept the fact that she is now a part of a large family. I hope so for his sake. 

    • #1
    • July 30, 2019, at 3:17 PM PDT
    • 1 like
  2. GFHandle Member

    I think there were two spaces after a sentence when typing on a machine that had a mono-spaced font. Every manual typewriter has such a font. Doing so was not some sort of empty “convention.” Nowadays, we all have proportional fonts–we basically typeset our own work on our word-processors/computers. (I remember being amazed at the elegance of what the IBM Selectric could produce on paper compared with the older typewriters.) So Jacob Rees Mogg is being a bit anachronistic here. Fully in character, no? 

    And the comma before “and” is not before a “final clause” but merely to clarify a series–even a series of nouns. “The pudding is made with suet, cheese, milk, bread, and butter.” That prevents the confusion of bread as an ingredient and butter as an ingredient with “bread and butter,” which is sometimes a meal in itself in my house.

    And while I’m at it I abhor the British habit of omitting a comma after an introductory phrase or clause: “After he had eaten the horse came over to him.” Contrary to the schoolbooks, the comma does not mark merely a pause; it helps with inflection of the voice, too.

     

     

    • #2
    • July 30, 2019, at 3:25 PM PDT
    • 7 likes
  3. Kephalithos Member

    GFHandle (View Comment): And while I’m at it I abhor the British habit of omitting a comma after an introductory phrase or clause: “After he had eaten the horse came over to him.” Contrary to the schoolbooks, the comma does not mark merely a pause; it helps with inflection of the voice, too.

    It also clarifies the relationship between independent and dependent clauses, makes any sentence’s subject immediately obvious, and . . . well, looks better.

    Not that any of this matters. The British just hate punctuation.

    • #3
    • July 30, 2019, at 5:41 PM PDT
    • 5 likes
  4. EJHill Podcaster

    Burwick Chiffswiddle: It also clarifies the relationship between independent and dependent clauses…

    As opposed to the independent and dependent classes...

     

    • #4
    • July 30, 2019, at 6:06 PM PDT
    • 1 like
  5. Snirtler Member

    Yes, your audience in the US is familiar with Jacob Rees-Mogg. If I might be self-promoting, https://ricochet.com/657084/jrm-new-leader-of-the-house-of-commons/.

    In his first turn at House business questions, there were a few exchanges mentioning his role as Leader is to be the voice of the Commons in Cabinet and to hold the government accountable to Parliament.

    • #5
    • July 30, 2019, at 6:08 PM PDT
    • 3 likes
  6. Taras Coolidge

    GFHandle (View Comment):

    I think there were two spaces after a sentence when typing on a machine that had a mono-spaced font. Every manual typewriter has such a font. Doing so was not some sort of empty “convention.” Nowadays, we all have proportional fonts–we basically typeset our own work on our word-processors/computers. (I remember being amazed at the elegance of what the IBM Selectric could produce on paper compared with the older typewriters.) So Jacob Rees Mogg is being a bit anachronistic here. Fully in character, no?

    And the comma before “and” is not before a “final clause” but merely to clarify a series–even a series of nouns. “The pudding is made with suet, cheese, milk, bread, and butter.” That prevents the confusion of bread as an ingredient and butter as an ingredient with “bread and butter,” which is sometimes a meal in itself in my house.

    And while I’m at it I abhor the British habit of omitting a comma after an introductory phrase or clause: “After he had eaten the horse came over to him.” Contrary to the schoolbooks, the comma does not mark merely a pause; it helps with inflection of the voice, too.

     

    To make a text easier to read, I put two spaces at the end of a sentence (if the software lets me), because a period is an almost-indistinguishable flyspeck.

    • #6
    • July 30, 2019, at 6:31 PM PDT
    • Like
  7. MarciN Member

    Burwick Chiffswiddle (View Comment):

    GFHandle (View Comment): And while I’m at it I abhor the British habit of omitting a comma after an introductory phrase or clause: “After he had eaten the horse came over to him.” Contrary to the schoolbooks, the comma does not mark merely a pause; it helps with inflection of the voice, too.

    It also clarifies the relationship between independent and dependent clauses, makes any sentence’s subject immediately obvious, and . . . well, looks better.

    Not that any of this matters. The British just hate punctuation.

    I don’t agree with that. They love semicolons. My word. Most of the time, they use them the way we use colons. But they also use them to give themselves permission to write never-ending sentences. Their sentences are far longer than ours. I think they like to be reserved and quiet, and they don’t like the assertiveness of ending one sentence and beginning a new one. Too much emphasis. Makes them nervous. :-) I say this with great affection for British writers. :-)

    • #7
    • July 30, 2019, at 10:26 PM PDT
    • 3 likes
  8. colleenb Member

    I’ll chime in on the punctuation because, really, I have an opinion about pretty much everything. As you can see I do 2 spaces after a full stop. I know MK Hamm hates that but I think I’m too old to change. I agree wholeheartedly w/ @gfhandle, leaving out the comma before the and changes the meaning and/or makes it less than clear. I read that a will written as A, B and C was interpreted as A and B &C splitting an half rather than a third to A, B, and C. That may be an urban legend but I think that final comma makes it crystal clear.

    • #8
    • July 31, 2019, at 12:39 PM PDT
    • Like
  9. Annefy Member

    According to Eats, Shoots and Leaves: one space after a full stop. It’s more visually appealing; two spaces results in “rivers” of space on the page.

    • #9
    • July 31, 2019, at 4:36 PM PDT
    • 2 likes
  10. EJHill Podcaster

    Annefy: …two spaces results in “rivers” of space on the page.

    Go on and type me a river…

    Type me a river…

    I typed a river over you…

    • #10
    • July 31, 2019, at 6:07 PM PDT
    • 1 like
  11. Annefy Member

    EJHill (View Comment):

    Annefy: …two spaces results in “rivers” of space on the page.

    Go on and type me a river…

    Type me a river…

    I typed a river over you…

    Down to the river …

    • #11
    • July 31, 2019, at 10:40 PM PDT
    • Like
  12. Max Ledoux Admin

    Two spaces after a period is a relic from typewriters and printing presses. It is not correct for modern usage. It is an anachronism.

    colleenb (View Comment):
    As you can see I do 2 spaces after a full stop.

    Actually, no one can see your two spaces here on Ricochet because I programmed the site to remove multiple spaces. On websites, multiple spaces cause problems with web browser windows that can be any width depending on the end user’s monitor size as well as how wide the user has chosen to make their window. Often two spaces after a period will result in the first character in a line being a white space. This looks really bad. As an example, here’s your comment if your two spaces were actually displayed:

    In a printed newspaper column or a typed page you would never have the first character on a new line be a white space because the column width or page width is fixed and the person doing the typesetting/typing knows what it is. But on a website, while there is a minimum and maximum width, there is a wide range in between that is entire dependent no the end user’s person preference.

    • #12
    • August 2, 2019, at 10:41 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  13. Taras Coolidge

    Max Ledoux (View Comment):

    Two spaces after a period is a relic from typewriters and printing presses. It is not correct for modern usage. It is an anachronism.

    colleenb (View Comment):
    As you can see I do 2 spaces after a full stop.

    Actually, no one can see your two spaces here on Ricochet because I programmed the site to remove multiple spaces. On websites, multiple spaces cause problems with web browser windows that can be any width depending on the end user’s monitor size as well as how wide the user has chosen to make their window. Often two spaces after a period will result in the first character in a line being a white space. This looks really bad. As an example, here’s your comment if your two spaces were actually displayed:

    In a printed newspaper column or a typed page you would never have the first character on a new line be a white space because the column width or page width is fixed and the person doing the typesetting/typing knows what it is. But on a website, while there is a minimum and maximum width, there is a wide range in between that is entire dependent no the end user’s person preference.

    “Actually, no one can see your two spaces here on Ricochet because I programmed the site to remove multiple spaces.”

    Hmmm …

    Max, are you sure you’re not a progressive?

    • #13
    • August 2, 2019, at 3:53 PM PDT
    • 1 like